Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Adoptive Families Association of British Columbia

Social Innovation Cohort: Adoption Expo

A grant towards participation in a development process to explore the concept of an Adoption Expo and assess the impact of such an event for ourselves and for our prospective partners. Following the development phase we will then have a clearer understanding of the logistics and the outcomes that can drive a decision to hold an Adoption Expo.
$7,500.00
2016

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

Sharing Homes and Lives; Aging, Affordability, and Happiness

Our project involves: 1. Convening seniors and their families, young people and youth leaving care, and other potential stakeholders, in order to understand their very diverse contexts and to begin (a) articulating a value-base and vision that will ground how shared lives models are to be conceived and supported, (b) imagining and co-designing variants to life-sharing models that would fit individual's own, diverse circumstances, (c) beta-testing things like risk-sharing agreements, matchmaking/meetup formats and events, new screening and monitoring frameworks, and so on. 2. Investigating match-making services and algorithms to prototype more effective matching tools than conventional application and assessment processes 3. Designing the right infrastructure/container that will support these activities, including the roles, policies, practices and technology components. 4. Investigating the power of peer-to-peer models like Air BnB and Uber in order to see how these sorts of emerging solutions might apply or be adapted to our context, Through these sorts of activities, we (1) change the ownership of the model and begin to build participation in a movement (2) create an opportunity to build a new discourse around risk that we jointly share and mitigate, (3) create diverse solutions and models; (4) establish policy and infrastructure AFTER we know what works, versus services patterned after existing policies and system cultures.
$131,000.00
2016

Canucks Autism Network Society

Adapted Sports and Rec Expansion in Kamloops and Nanaimo for Children Living with Autism

With 1 in 68 children identified as being on the autism spectrum, the need for adapted sports and recreation programs is growing. This project aims to increase our program reach throughout the province by expanding into new, under-served communities where we do not currently have programs (Nanaimo and Kamloops). Additionally this project strives to increase community capacity through the delivery of autism specific sport and recreation training for our partners, by including their staff in our programs so they can gain hands on autism specific sport delivery experience, and developing a train the trainer model so our partners have the skills and tools to support individuals with autism in their existing community programs. Through this three year approach, we will move from hands on program delivery of adapted sports and recreation programs, to community centre staff being trained to deliver recreation programs for people living with autism through partnered program delivery to finally overseeing integrated sports and recreation programs that take place within the community.
$138,000.00
2016

Carnegie Community Centre Association

Social Innovation Cohort: Our Community Vision for Mental Health

A grant to participate in a development process to explore ideas around utilizing the experiential knowledge of participants and includes two key components: community participatory research and a grassroots visioning process. Through the participatory research portion of the project we are seeking to contribute to a broadened understanding of the societal and social determinants of mental health, especially the issues and barriers specifically faced by low-income DTES resident with mental illness. This first phase has already started and we have been having regular weekly meetings to plan the research process. Building on research findings emerging from the first phase, our second objective is to co-create a shared community vision of mental health in the DTES. By engaging in practical community research and knowledge production, participants not only learn new skills but see themselves in a position of competence, as experts of their own health and wellbeing, while also obtaining valuable knowledge and information about the structures surrounding them. This approach will combine participation and knowledge to foster DTES residents confidence and leadership abilities to meaningfully participate in decision-making forums and processes, sustain broader community involvement, and work with related community groups to build consensus, strength and new relationships towards improving their own mental health as well as the wider health of their families and community.
$7,500.00
2016

Our Community Vision for Mental Health

The project is based on the recognition that housing is a primary and fundamental social determinant of mental health. It seeks to give low-income Downtown Eastside residents living with mental illness, trauma, and disability the power to contribute to—and seek knowledge about—their health by developing a new “residents first” approach to supportive housing provision and management. Their influence is integral to bettering social housing. We will facilitate spaces to draft and establish best practices and guidelines for meeting and decision-making. We observe an urgent need to work well in coalition, in good communication with other organizations, groups, networks, and services and we can contribute to their longevity. Part of our work will be to strengthen our community member's capacity to participate in decision-making structures. Through visual description, creative form, mapping, media we will address language barriers related to literacy and translation. We can influence the representation of our community. This work will advance our knowledge of supportive housing provision. Amplifying residents' voices and experience informed and grounded in the experience and needs of existing and future social housing residents. As a peer-led project, this plan will have at its core the fundamental belief that people living with mental illness, addictions, and poverty should be able to make basic decisions concerning the day-to-day activities in their lives and homes.
$10,000.00
2016

CCEDNet

Social Finance for Community Health and Well Being in British Columbia

Firstly we will compile a summary of existing research on impacts and models of place-based social finance in Canada and BC, and use that evidence to invite participation in and inform a "Learning Community" of practitioner and policy stakeholders in BC that will be convened over the lifetime of the project. Secondly we will support the implementation of two investment vehicles by the Vancouver Island Community Investment Cooperative that are currently in development. One is a Community Loan Fund in partnership with an Island based Credit Union that will invite contributions to a dedicated GIC the deposits in which will serve as collateral for loans to affordable rental housing, renewable energy, sustainable agriculture and fisheries, First Nations economic development, and other local owned ethical enterprises that create social benefits and community impacts. The other vehicle is a securities regulated investment fund that is RRSP eligible that will be implemented in partnership with a Securities Registered Investment Management Company to support the same types of community benefits. Thirdly we will evaluate both the social and economic impact of the funds and use that information to inform stakeholders and the Learning Community and assist with dialogue with the BC Government, the media, the finance sector, the Securities Commission, and municipalities on enabling public policy needed to help a place-based retail social financing to grow to scale in BC.
$225,000.00
2016

Christ Church Cathedral

Social Innovation Cohort: Transforming Food Outreach Programs

A grant to participate in a development process ito explore the connection between and amongst volunteers, participants, and outside supports, with the goal of re-designing our programs to increase connectivity and reduce social isolation. This will be achieved by: • Reviewing the Cathedral’s existing food outreach and its suitability for the homeless population in the downtown business district through - Consulting with existing participants to determine their own needs and reasons for participating in the Cathedral’s food outreach programs - Consulting with existing volunteers to determine their own needs and reasons for participating in the Cathedral’s food outreach programs - Consulting with other downtown churches and service providers to assess current services in the immediate area • Prototyping, workshopping and designing opportunities – with the assistance of volunteers and participants – new or re-envisioned program offerings that respond to the most clearly articulated needs - Surveying the Cathedral’s volunteer database to determine availability and willingness to serve in these ways - Developing and/or strengthening partnerships with other service providers and voluntary organizations in downtown Vancouver that will help respond to these needs - Identifying trained professionals who can assist with new initiatives as identified in project plan
$7,500.00
2016

The Maundy Cafe

Systemic change beyond the Cathedral relies on vulnerably sharing the lessons learned through our year-long program transformation process with faith-based organizations seeking a way to deepen community engagement. This project will catalyze systemic change by building on faith leaders’ recognition of social isolation as a major issue facing their communities and neighbourhood networks. By sharing our experiences we will encourage other organizations to take similar risks to address the bigger issues of loss of community and economic bifurcation. The project will create toolkits, training programs, and workshops that will help other faith-based organizations to transform the entire process of food preparing, serving, composting, and cleaning into the vehicle by which inclusion, participation and community resiliency can be strengthened. We will also influence systemic change through the provision of focused opportunities for study and practical hands-on learning. In collaboration with our partners including other non-profits and local businesses, we will host public keynote events focused on how others can address social isolation, as well as workshops and voluntary opportunities for enterprises looking to channel their corporate social responsibility.
$10,000.00
2016

Collingwood Neighbourhood House Society

Health and Safety Beyond the Margins: Scaling and Expanding the Living in Community Model

The project will apply LIC’s meta-framework to create coherent regional and provincial approaches to sex work to reduce the violence sex workers experience and create communities that are healthy and safe for everyone. We will build relationships with organizations who play key roles in supporting sex work health and safety across BC, including police, municipalities, nonprofits and health authorities. Using our successful Curriculum for Change training in addition to new multimedia tools, we will educate these stakeholders about the impacts of stigma and unpack the cultural constraints that keep barriers in place for sex workers. We will then build a provincial network of stakeholders that will identify best practices to increase sex work safety through policy level change and reduction of systemic bias against sex workers. This dialogue will lead to a 2017 provincial conference. This network will then take leadership in coordinating regional approaches and implementing best practices within their organizations and local communities. Scaling our work is critical because many of the systemic changes that are necessary do not rest at the organizational or local level but require consistent, collaborative and regional or provincial approaches. Scaling will also allow this work to ultimately be embedded in policy that is sustainable over time. Moreover, the marginalization of sex workers necessitates a cultural change where sex workers are seen as equal members of society.
$150,000.00
2016

Cowichan Social Planning Society

Cultural Connections: Re-Building Our Villages

We will begin by connecting with the communities that have expressed interest and develop 3 year plans with them that will begin the process of creating direction and beginning to build capacity within their own communities based on their needs, their challenges and their strengths. Our first step once we go into a community is to meet with members of the First Nations territories, ask permission, guidance and level of involvement that they would like to see and at what stages of the process they would like to be involved and/or lead From there: Community Based Workshop Series Creating a Cultural Shift: Healing our past, planning for our future Process: Large Group Workshops: Our Shared History Small Group Reflection: Rebuilding the Village; From a New Perspective What have we learned, what would we like to do, build framework for moving forward. Our Facilitation Team addressed over 200 LGLA members in Parksville. Introducing one of the exercises, Lucy Thomas told participants that, “What we are asking you to do today is going to take you out of your comfort zone. As we move forward through this process of healing and work to change the nature of our relationships, there will be many times we will feel both challenged and uncomfortable -we must remember not to let our discomfort stop us from continuing to move.”Scaling this to other regions provides opportunity for FN people to be the leaders of the reconciliation process, changing the systems from within.
$150,000.00
2016

Disability Alliance BC

The Right Fit Pilot Project: Facilitating Occupancy of Wheelchair Accessible Housing

DABC and our RFPP steering committee partners are seeking to change the system of wheelchair accessible housing provision in Metro Vancouver. Our desired outcome is the removal of the systemic barriers we have highlighted, so that wheelchair users can obtain the housing and supports they need through an accessible, timely and efficient process. The 3-year RFPP is designed to be a systemic intervention to test the development of fast track policies and procedures in MSDSI, the region's Health Authorities, linking and growing an enhanced registry of available accessible housing, and utilizing financial incentives for housing providers to maintain vacancies until wheelchair users can occupy their available accessible units. The RFPP will accommodate a constant caseload flow of 20 wheelchair users with the expectation that 60 or more will be served over the 3-year period. The RFPP aims to test the following system changes in Metro Vancouver: • Health authorities pre-screen and pre-approve home support and occupational therapy needs assessments; • MSDSI streamlines existing equipment allocation processes for eligible RFPP participants; • Housing providers funnel all accessible housing vacancies through the RFPP; • BC Housing makes funding available to housing providers to hold appropriate units until a RFPP participant can occupy a unit; • RFPP participants receive specialized case management and peer support to enable them to access units as quickly as possible.
$223,538.00
2016

Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House

Social Innovation Cohort: LET’S SPEAK UP! : VOLUNTEER DEVELOPMENT AND COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP PROJECT FOR THE DTES

A grant to participate in a development process in order to explore ideas around the structural barriers created by legislation of the Charity and Societies legislation that contribute to barriers. Analyze and articulate ways that organizations by-laws create barriers and create paternalism Assess whether there is an interest on the part of DTES Charity groups to meaningfully engage the resident population Set up workshop and focus group schedules, identify outside resource, contact guest speakers and facilitators to give the leadership training workshops to pilot a community voices project that trains and engages local residents in civic leadership and engagement Draft interview scripts based on findings from the initial research, and contact interviewees to develop a schedule. Launch workshops marketing and promotion by various channels, and recruit participants for the workshops. Conduct interviews Non-profit board chairs. Implement workshops and collect feedback. Analyze data of interviews. Implement workshops and collect feedback. Draft final research report. Develop volunteer training curriculum with the volunteer coordinator. Final research report due. Final volunteer training curriculum completed.
$7,500.00
2016

LET’S SPEAK UP! : VOLUNTEER DEVELOPMENT AND COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP PROJECT FOR THE DTES

Building a model which provides access to the 260 agencies in the DTES involves five discrete components. Components include: 1. Creating a personalized access program for interested community members. . 2. Ensuring that boards are resourced to uphold their commitment by ensuring a participant’s basic needs can be met as well as providing the tools and services necessary to remain involved on the board (child care, transportation, food, training, etc.) 3. Develop Board “twins” where long-term members partner with community members and both can help train other board members and create accommodations for all members in a spirit of inclusion and respect. 4. Develop an inclusive leadership charter, willingly signed, promoted and implemented by all DTES agencies 5. Create affiliations with legal and policy organizations to effect policy and legislative change that will remove legislative barriers that impede community engagement.
$128,700.00
2016

Fraser Basin Council Society

Rural Housing First

The project is to pilot a rural HF program, and to test the model on a small scale with a targeted group prior to scaling up the approach to meet the broader community needs. Ultimately, the entire process of housing and support will be redesigned as per the principles of HF: 1. Immediate access to permanent housing with no housing readiness requirements 2. Choice and self-determination 3. Recovery orientation 4. Individualized supports 5. Social and community integration We will redesign housing access processes and protocols to maximize the use of existing resources for a test group of clients. Current access for marginalized and vulnerable clients is based on individuals seeking housing services directly from each service. The proposed approach will coordinate access, and utilize existing outreach staff to identify clients who are need of housing and supports. We will work directly in partnership with landlords to ensure appropriate placement and ongoing support of the landlord-tenant relationship. The Housing and Homelessness Committee will serve as program advisors, redesign intake and case management protocols, and assist with client eligibility assessments. We will aim to complete integrated intake and assessment and housing for a maximum of 20 clients annually and provide ongoing supports as needed. The pilot will be evaluated from the perspective of clients, workers, community partners, landlords, and other relevant stakeholders.
$221,750.00
2016

IDHHC

Hearing Aid Lending Program for Vulnerable Adults and Seniors

IDHHC will establish a “Lend an Ear” program designed to provide refurbished hearing aids to vulnerable and at risk adult populations and expand aural rehab and speech-reading programs to provide comprehensive services for this demographic. Given there are no free, low cost or subsidies available for hearing aids or assistive devices in BC, low income and vulnerable adults fall between the cracks for service and become increasingly isolated and vulnerable. The first year we will establish the program and begin dispensing refurbished aids using an income based formula. Year two we will expand marketing of the program, evaluate the effectiveness and outcomes of year 1 and look at ways to address the issues of waitlist (which we strongly anticipate). Selling of low cost aids may become an option and fee for service scales may be developed to offset the cost of free hearing aids in the loaner program and to reduce waitlists. Ongoing we will gather data and outcomes and show that the provision of hearing aids along with personal communication supports can and does address social determinants of health. Hearing loss combined with low income does not have to mean isolation and loss of quality of life. Having all of our partners engaged is a critical base to create a community model that aims to: bring hearing health issues to the forefront, and to create the conversation and movement that will move this agenda forward with political leaders and decision-makers.
$210,000.00
2016

Institute of Families for Child & Youth Mental Health

FamilySmart Network - Ready, Set, Collaborate

The World Health Organization developed a Framework for action that speaks to the necessity for interprofessional education in order to achieve collaborative practice & the Institute of Families believes this can be broadened by testing the inclusion of young people & families in collective learning that results in all being collaborative practice ready. We have tangible experiences, skills and examples that will be built on in our proposed test. For research expertise we will partner with the McCreary Centre & Stigma & Resilience Among Vulnerable Youth Centre (SARAVYC). Our project is to test & prove our belief that there is a pre-step before implementation of collaborative practice, which we refer to as being ‘Practice Ready’ & offer recommendations & practical practices for how to ensure professionals & youth & families are ready & able to collaborate successfully together. We will build on the current knowledge & experience that we have in engagement, empowerment, collaborating & connecting & invite all disciplines to come along-side young people & families to collectively learn from each other & prepare to be collaborative practice ready. We believe that professionals & lay people can & should be empowered & supported to be contributors & influencers. Everyone has distinct & specialized knowledge that is valuable & necessary to build communities where children, youth & families are safe, included, connected & supported. They are all interdisciplinary team members.
$225,000.00
2016

Marpole-Oakridge Family Place Society

Social Innovation Cohort: Buidling Capacity Bridging the Divide in Marpole

A grant to participate in a development process in order to explore the following issues: - a community assessment map of services, service providers, businesses, and public partners - identify who the stakeholders of the community are - a stakeholder engagement process to decide what are the gaps in services in the community and where should services be provided - the committee will collect, process, and evaluate the information gathered and create a capacity building and community bridging plan for the Marpole Oakridge area - create a terms of reference for process of engagement with current and future community partners and service providers - create an effective system of information and resource sharing to bridge the gap between service providers and provide easy access to information and resources for stakeholders The end result will be a plan that outlines how to address the change in services, location of services, how information is distributed throughout the community and City as large of changes, programs and resources available.
$7,500.00
2016

Nanaimo Child Development Centre Society

Creating Systemic Change for Physically Disabled Youth in Need of Mental Health Services

Navigation programs are an important short term strategy to help families make their way through a complex & often segregated array of mental health services. They are also a path to direct action to resolve barriers to care, achieving systemic reform. Having recently received a grant & some Board funding to test such a program, the NCDC will assess the extent to which it can influence the latter. At a systems level, by liaising with families with lived experience, mental health support groups & clinicians, adjunct care agencies & funding bodies, the navigator will “map the system” resulting in the identification of the common challenges & service gaps facing families & highlight promising practices & potential opportunities for systemic change. At a clinical level, clients are initially triaged by a NCDC Zone Team. If a Team cannot manage a client's needs, the navigator will enlist support from the broader community, promoting agency collaboration & integration of mental health services. At an individual level, families engaged in program development will, with peer support, begin to advocate for change. Work at all levels will, we believe, change the way we interact with clients, provider groups & funders; identify pressure points & force a reallocation of resources internally & externally; inform public policy. It expects us to be innovative, to rethink the current landscape & acknowledge that systemic change requires patience, persistence, & commitment.
$50,000.00
2016

Native Courtworker & Counselling Association of B.C.

Building Consensus Towards a Better Outcomes Strategy for Aboriginal Children

The newly-formed Aboriginal Justice Council, a collaborative partnership between three major First Nations change agents in BC, aims to facilitate social inclusion for Aboriginal children who are impacted by ongoing exclusion, stigmatization, and trauma as a result of their involvement in the child protection and justice systems. The Aboriginal Justice Council will work with government agencies as equals to identify issues in existing mechanisms, policies, procedures, and processes and develop consensus on a better justice outcomes strategy to reduce the numbers of Aboriginal children removed from families and communities and placed into foster care and jails, and to increase their belonging and inclusion. This project will disrupt the existing system by creating a new highly credible and trusted key player that cannot be ignored or merely accommodated but whose recommendations must be adhered to. This requires frank dialogue on years of disinvestment and disempowerment resulting from colonial governance and practice and the profound lack of interest, sense of accountability, and empathy concerning the legacy of adverse results for Aboriginal people. The council will focus its attention, as mandated by the people, on creating meaningful change in existing systems that will facilitate social inclusion for all Aboriginal children in BC who are part of the overrepresentation in or vulnerable to becoming part of the justice and child protection systems, and their families.
$59,830.00
2016

Network of Inner City Community Services Society

Social Innovation Cohort: Chinese-speaking Seniors Service Delivery HUB

A grant to participate in a development process to explore the needs of Chinese-speaking seniors in our community. The question is not ‘what kind of special projects can we create to reach out to and support these seniors?’ but, rather, “given that the majority of these seniors are long-tern members of the community, and that the majority of them are Canadian citizens, why have the public and private services, that should be available to residents, not been designed and developed in ways that meet the needs of this key community demographic?” As was pointed out at a recent meeting of service providers, almost all the services available in the neighbourhood are focused on serving people living with addictions and/or severe mental health issues, many of whom live in SROs or are on the street. It is little wonder that many elderly residents of the area, whether Chinese-speaking or not, feel not just uncomfortable but afraid when trying to access these services, even though they may desperately need the assistance. One of the models to which we will be looking as we move forward is that of the highly successful ‘South Vancouver Seniors Hub” and, in particular, the toolkit developed by the Hub (Seniors Hub Toolkit) to assist other neighbourhoods in empowering and supporting seniors to directly impact the types of services and supports available to them.
$7,500.00
2016

Power to the People(!): making a neighbourhood work for Chinese speaking Seniors

This project takes a different approach than has traditionally been taken in looking at the needs of Chinese-speaking seniors in our community, i.e.: not ‘what kind of special projects can we create to reach out to and support these seniors?’ but, rather, “given that the majority of these seniors are long-term members of the community, and that the majority of them are Canadian citizens, why have the public and private services that should be available to residents not been designed and developed in ways that meet the needs of this key community demographic?” 1. Addressing service fragmentation • Formalize Service Providers’ Network • Develop and update a bilingual service directory 2. Empowering Chinese seniors by creating a seniors’ advisory (SA), and ultimately a Seniors Hub Model. We will be using learning from the highly-successful ‘South Vancouver Seniors Hub” and, in particular, the toolkit developed by the Hub( Seniors Hub Toolkit) to assist other neighbourhoods in empowering and supporting seniors to directly impact the types of services and supports available to them. • Identify Chinese-speaking seniors who are leaders and volunteers in the neighbourhood. • Develop Chinese materials and conduct outreach to engage Chinese senior community • Conduct capacity-building activities to build seniors’ collective knowledge and voice • Work with SA to develop terms of reference and vision for council • Support SA members to utilize their personal networks
$10,000.00
2016

Pacific Community Resources Society

Social Innovation Cohort: LGBTQ2S Mentorship

A grant to participate in a development process in order to explore the idea to create a new pathway for LGBTQ2S youth to access services and supports related to housing, life skills, and social-emotional competence. Research has shown that building permanency though stable and supportive close relationships leads to more positive outcomes for youth in care. Our project will focus on LGBTQ2S youth who are in care, in unsafe/unsupportive homes, homeless, or unstably housed to build long-term community connections through establishing a roster of queer-friendly community housing alternatives, mentorship pairing, and a network of supportive LGBTQ2S peers and adults. The development process will begin by consulting key stakeholders on issues relating to LGBTQ2S youth. We will talk to young people and frontline workers (such as our Housing staff) to better understand gaps in our current system and we will connect with community organizations who have implemented programs related to LGBTG2S youth, housing, and mentorship to better understand what is being done. Specifically, we look to the Boys and Girls Clubs of Calgary’s new Aura Host Homes project as model for social innovation in this area. Finally, we plan to assess the available resources and capacity that exists for this project by forming a planning group made up of stakeholders from BYRC and at least one additional organization. Together with a youth steering committee we will determine an outline for a pilot project pairing mentorship with housing for LGBTQ2S youth.
$7,500.00
2016

Phoenix Transition Society

Harmony House: Holistic Perinatal Supportive Housing for Women Struggling with Substance Use

The proposed project aims to provide upstream prevention and early intervention supports to women struggling with substance use, especially Indigenous women, while they are pregnant and during the post-partum period using a decolonizing approach. The project will 1) provide safe and supportive housing in Prince George that will deliver a harm reduction, holistic model of care that has only previously been modeled in large urban centers and, 2) provide comprehensive services targeted at pregnant substance-using women adressing medical, mental, emotional and spiritual health. The program will assist women to gain life-skills, Elder mentorship, ready access to pre and postpartum education and support, assistance in moving into independent living with their infants, and break generational cycles of substance-use and child apprehension in communities. An important, and unique aspect of this project will be incorporation of Indigenous traditions and approaches to health with Aboriginal grandmothers at the center of our approach. Our project will influence systemic change towards health and well-being by targeting social determinants affecting vulnerable, pregnant women. More than solely housing, our approach aims to model culturally safe, wrap-around care for at risk women in a way that is highly scalabe to other rural and remote settings. Furthermore, this project follows a holistic and decolonizing approach to care - an emergent approach to providing care accross the north.
$225,000.00
2016

Pivot Foundation

Improving the Policing and Justice System Response to Marginalized Survivors of Sexual Assault in BC

Our goal in undertaking this project is to ensure that marginalized women reporting sexual violence do not experience discrimination and re-victimization when accessing police services. This project takes a two-pronged approach to social change. First, it will endeavour to address what we believe to be true by unpacking how beliefs about the credibility and reliability of certain girls and women impact equitable access to police and justice system response. Secondly, it seeks to change laws policies and rules by challenging formal laws and policies that perpetuate bias and undermine equitable access to police and the justice system. Pivot will determine whether litigation, or the threat thereof, is needed to force reform initiatives within both police and Crown Prosecution Services in order to create regulations that would assist in overcoming the stereotypes and prejudices, leading to better outcomes for women and more accountability for offenders. This development project will allow us to determine whether our campaign model can be applied to the issue of the police and justice system response to sexual assaults. Specifically, we will work with referring organizations and women survivors who have shared their stories to identify which behaviours, policies and practices limit access to justice for victims and accountability for offenders.
$10,000.00
2016

PORT ALBERNI SHELTER SOCIETY

Port Alberni Shelter Farm and Training Center

The Shelter Farm and Training Center will directly address issues of health, poverty and food security by growing vegetables and distributing the harvest to those most in need and by also supporting the development of a return to agriculture in the Alberni Valley by providing training and jobs for youth in the community and creating an internship program for aspiring young farmers, with a focus on those who currently experience poverty. By investing our energy into the long term goal of creating a self-sufficient and food secure community, we are confident that we can help reverse the effects that poor health is having on our community and the ways in which it is passed on from generation to generation in an endless cycle. To resolve the issue of food deserts in our community, we will look to offer delivery of food boxes to those who do not benefit from owning their own transportation means. The outcomes will be: - Increased local food for those dealing with financial challenges - More young farmers growing organic food in the community - Enhanced awareness of the benefits of eating healthy - Stewards of sustainable small-scale farming business models - Education farm open to schools and the greater community
$10,000.00
2016

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