Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Pivot Foundation

Improving the Policing and Justice System Response to Marginalized Survivors of Sexual Assault in BC

Our goal in undertaking this project is to ensure that marginalized women reporting sexual violence do not experience discrimination and re-victimization when accessing police services. This project takes a two-pronged approach to social change. First, it will endeavour to address what we believe to be true by unpacking how beliefs about the credibility and reliability of certain girls and women impact equitable access to police and justice system response. Secondly, it seeks to change laws policies and rules by challenging formal laws and policies that perpetuate bias and undermine equitable access to police and the justice system. Pivot will determine whether litigation, or the threat thereof, is needed to force reform initiatives within both police and Crown Prosecution Services in order to create regulations that would assist in overcoming the stereotypes and prejudices, leading to better outcomes for women and more accountability for offenders. This development project will allow us to determine whether our campaign model can be applied to the issue of the police and justice system response to sexual assaults. Specifically, we will work with referring organizations and women survivors who have shared their stories to identify which behaviours, policies and practices limit access to justice for victims and accountability for offenders.
$10,000.00
2016

PORT ALBERNI SHELTER SOCIETY

Port Alberni Shelter Farm and Training Center

The Shelter Farm and Training Center will directly address issues of health, poverty and food security by growing vegetables and distributing the harvest to those most in need and by also supporting the development of a return to agriculture in the Alberni Valley by providing training and jobs for youth in the community and creating an internship program for aspiring young farmers, with a focus on those who currently experience poverty. By investing our energy into the long term goal of creating a self-sufficient and food secure community, we are confident that we can help reverse the effects that poor health is having on our community and the ways in which it is passed on from generation to generation in an endless cycle. To resolve the issue of food deserts in our community, we will look to offer delivery of food boxes to those who do not benefit from owning their own transportation means. The outcomes will be: - Increased local food for those dealing with financial challenges - More young farmers growing organic food in the community - Enhanced awareness of the benefits of eating healthy - Stewards of sustainable small-scale farming business models - Education farm open to schools and the greater community
$10,000.00
2016

Port Moody Station Museum

Seniors Engagement at the Port Moody Station Museum

Our social innovation is to have the Port Moody Station Museum improve how seniors are treated as part of our community; to be an ‘Age Friendly Community’ (AFC). The Port Moody Station Museum owned by the charitable Port Moody Heritage Society, in order to stay relevant and meet its mission, must adapt and change to meet community needs. There have been significant amounts of literature developed on the issues of an AFC (how seniors are treated as part of our community). In 2014, the City of Port Moody undertook a study to determine how much of an Age Friendly Community they are. The study indicated a number of areas of concern; the most important being how seniors are assisted/encouraged to be included as a productive part of society. Seniors isolation and lack of inclusion are two other issues the study indicated a need to be addressed. The idea of creating a Seniors Hub (seniors meeting place) was identified as a method to meet these challenges. However, the study appears to be a ‘built it and they will come’ philosophy. What is required is a verifiable detailed action plan of concrete items that will insure success for the project. To meet its mission in the future, the Port Moody Station Museum must change from a traditional museum model to that of engaging the community on a daily/weekly basis. The Port Moody Heritage Society can assist the City of Port Moody to become a more age friendly community by engaging seniors in being a productive part of its offering
$7,600.00
2016

posAbilities Association of British Columbia

Mobilizing the Arts to Catalyze a Movement

For the next year (2016), we will work with a broad-base set of arts-based and non-arts based partners to host meet-ups, events and activations that begin to map and network the landscape of people, projects and associations that are trying to engender citizen engagement, as well as social connection, inclusion and resiliency. This work will culminate in a festival in May/June 2017 wherein we will partner with the Spur Festival to host a public and accessible festival with the theme of (presently) “Alone Together.” The Festival brings thought leaders, artists and the public together to reflect on this topic. Publicly accessible art is already an integral feature of the festival—spoken word, dance, music, etc. However, we will expand the arts component so that there are many activations occurring throughout the city while also focusing them all on a call to action that inspires audiences to make the shift from spectators into participants. We will (1) mobilize and network many artists from diverse backgrounds, (2) deploy a broad range of interactive medium and modalities, and (3) optimize exposure (public places, buzz, etc.). Insofar as inclusive community is one where everyone belongs, it will be essential that the artists are representative of the broad constituency of community: aboriginal artists, children and youth, persons with disabilities, etc. Bursaries will be made available to arts groups and they will be provided ongoing project support, as needed.
$10,000.00
2016

Proton Foundation

Honour:Health to Hand - "Totems in the Forest"

Honor:Health to Hand is OMVC’s commitment & response to community requests to aid with healthy development, diversify the economic base for homes & community & offer a culturally appropriate exemplary positive initiative to transfer skills & knowledge from Elder to youth, as it is well recognized that all on-reserve aboriginal youth are at risk & the oral traditions are at risk of dying. We will engage 8 Haida youth, including male & females & those with disabilities, with 3 Master Carvers in a 27-week cultural training/skill development initiative. It includes certification courses, mentorship, health & entrepreneurial aspects; offered at NorthWest Community College Campus in Masset, the high school trade shop, OMVC’s education/ eco-tourism facility-Hiellen Longhouse Village, the carving studio in Old Massett, & Emily Carr UofAD. Endorsed & mentored by Master Carvers Chief 7idansuu Jim Hart & Christian White youth will earn certificates, learn Haida art design/carving/business skills & assist in 2 projects; replication of the historic heritage Hliialang’inagee gyaa’ang Totem that stood in Hiellen Village 150+ years ago & develop a “Welcome Sign” with two small 8’ totems for the entrance to Hiellen Longhouse Village, approved by the Haida Repatriation Society. This will be exemplary, inclusive & engaging. At completion both will be erected during a high Haida celebration during Canada 150. Youth & elders will participate. Healing & reconciliation for all will be profound.
$75,000.00
2016

PuSh International Performing Arts

Concord Floral Youth Canada 150 – Community-Engaged Youth Workshops, Production and Arts Congress

Our project is entitled Concord Floral Youth Canada 150 – Production, Community-Engaged Youth Workshops, and Arts Congress” – an ambitious, Metro Vancouver-wide, 16-month (June 2016-Sept 2017) multi-layered youth initiative inspired by Canada’s Sesquicentennial, that brings together future arts and community leaders for creative expression, dialogue and skills development. The project will take place across Burnaby, Vancouver and Surrey. It will involve: 3) a three-month series of professional artist-led youth workshops on performance, industry best practices, community leadership skills and opportunities, career development in the arts, and innovative approaches to social media (Sept-Nov 2016); 2) a locally cast production (with Touchstone Theatre) of “Concord Floral” by Jordan Tannahill, 2014 Governor General Award winning Canadian playwright, (http://www.suburbanbeast.ca/concord-floral) (Dec 2016-Feb 2017) to premiere at the Shadbolt Centre for the Arts, then tour to the PuSh Festival and the Surrey Arts Centre; and 3) a (free) youth-driven Arts Congress, to be held at Surrey’s new City Hall (July 2017). Concord Floral Youth Canada 150 partners came together out of a desire for exploring and developing a collaborative model to share resources, perspectives and best practices. The project will impact the lives of over 450 youth (ages 15-25) and is envisioned as highly participatory, inclusive, and accessible.
$150,000.00
2016

Queer Arts Festival

Drama Queer: Seducing Social Change

QAF’s mandate is the very definition of systemic intervention—interrupting basic routines, interrogating ingrained beliefs of truth & right/wrong. From Oscar Wilde to General Idea, queer artists have been the vanguard of civil rights; with social & aesthetic innovation inextricably entwined. Curated by renowned scholar Jonathan Katz—best known for co-curating Hide/Seek, the Smithsonian’s 1st ever openly LGBT exhibition—the exhibition Drama Queer: Seducing Social Change explores this legacy. Katz explains: Wildly diverging queer artists have shared credence in art’s ability to, if not produce social change, at least lubricate its prospects. Central to this generalized belief is the idea that queerness works a seduction away from naturalized, normative & thus invisible ideological creeds towards a position that is precisely other to, at a tangent from, social expectation. In deviating from social norms, queer art thus calls the viewer, of whatever sexualities, to an awareness of their own deviancy. Our artists seek to change beliefs by making the viewer accomplice, queering their perspective, to see from a dissident vantage point. A curator tour & hands-on workshop for street-involved youth, public discussion salon & panel invite debate, with active participation from our most disenfranchised. Katz’s importance entices eminent artists to exhibit openly as queers, promoting greater regard in the art world, increasing visibility & engaging individuals in complex inquiry.
$45,000.00
2016

Ray-Cam Co-operative Centre

RISE- ALIVE-Inclusion and Reconciliation for Children and Youth

This project is a focused inclusion Strategy to engage vulnerable children and support their active inclusion in community centre programs. It will also serve to increase understanding within municipal neighborhood institutions, building their capacity to do this work. The specific project will incorporate a Learning Circles model, with RISE Leaders utilizing the capacity of Aboriginal children and youth as peer leaders in summer day camps, sports, and recreation programs -- reaching out to be more inclusive of all children in the area. The goal is to help all children feel part of the group and to have fun -- and to minimize them feeling singled out, left out, overlooked or labelled as a problem by other kids or group leaders. The purpose is not to diagnose, but to accommodate and include. The training will assist youth leaders to: • develop an increased awareness of the challenges some children face in being included in activities with their peers • develop a repertoire of strategies to use when faced with situations such as a child becoming frustrated or anxious, or two children arguing • Engage as program leaders and volunteer ‘buddies’ in regular sharing and learning circles. Vancouver Park Board neighborhood­based community centres will become enabling structures/anchors to support this work. A city-level Reconciliation Team will manage incremental neighborhood engagement work starting with 3­5 centres in 2016. Appendix A contains a more detailed overview
$28,000.00
2016

REACH Centre Association

Social Innovation Cohort: Citizen engagement in Innovative Accountable Primary Care Services

A grant to participate in a development process to explore the idea to bring together a network of groups and individuals from other non-profit organizations with a stake in access to primary care. This group would support the formation of a steering committee for a one year advocacy project. The initial work will involve creating this group and developing their awareness of this funding model and the CHC organizational model. This also would be a core activity of our proposed one year project. During the summer we would assess issues and needs, identify other stakeholder and interested partners and lay out the proposal for the one year project. This would involve a series of facilitated workshops with these partners to raise awareness of options available for funding health care delivery, and develop a business case for amending the eligibility criteria for implementation of the capitation model to include non-profit health care organizations. The one year proposal we would develop would include increasing awareness of this funding and organizational model through outreach and education, developing a pro forma for a primary care service model based on the population based funding program and the presence of a coalition which would spearhead a lobby and submission of funding requests. The long term goal will be to change policy at the provincial level to increase access to effective primary care services for those with complex health needs, and to give these patients a voice in the design of those services.
$7,500.00
2016

Population-based, citizen engaged-primary health care

Our project is working toward the broad outcome of empowering individuals to enjoy levels of health and well being achievable by addressing social determinants. Through building a case for non-profit health care organizations to access population based funding (capitation), we hope to effect a policy change in the funding of primary health care to provide a broader range of health care to community, allowing a variety of health services to be offered from the same pool of funds. This will make health care more accessible to community, especially to those of us with complex health needs. We plan to form a coalition of health care organizations to provide a comprehensive care network, and will work to promote a change in beliefs of a social system that physician-led primary care is the only option. This may lead to a change in basic routines as well: as public perceptions change and clinics offer alternatives to physician care, patients may seek to fulfill their primary health care needs from a variety of care practitioners. REACH community health clinic is well placed to convene and test this alternative because we have delivered primary health care in a non profit community governed model for over 40 years. We are strategically placed in the community, we have a history, we are a member of the CHC Association, and we have created partnerships with other allied health care organizations over the years.
$10,000.00
2016

Richmond Food Bank Society

Eliminating Barriers to Participation for People Experiencing Poverty

Monthly: Hold Steering Committee meetings made up of PRC coalition members, to provide community oversight to project activities Month 1: Meet with local community services staff to engage these agencies and their clients in the project Month 2: Advertise, receive, select and orient participants and other individuals experiencing poverty for conversation circles, Committee of Peers (CoP) and self-advocacy network (SAN) Month 3: Train facilitators and develop questions for conversation circles Month 4: Conduct conversation circles with service agency staff/volunteers Month 5-6 Conduct conversation circles with low-income individuals; interview and select rest of CoP Month 7-8: Examine and collate information gathered to determine gaps, systemic barriers, solutions, etc. Month 8-10 Convene CoP and SAN to build advocacy toolkit ideas such as: skills workshops, advocacy and leadership training, public speaking, book of stories, video Month 10-12 Seek opportunities with local faith groups, service clubs, municipal government for self-advocates to tell their stories Quarterly: Meet with CoP to gain insight on how to guide and amend the project Quarterly: Develop, publish and distribute newsletter with articles on project milestones, personal stories and interviews September 2017: Host a Community Forum on Barriers to Participation and Ideas for Change. Celebrate the project with participants and volunteers Month 12: Complete final report for VF
$10,000.00
2016

Richmond Society for Community Living

Grade 13 Transition Project

The Grade 13 Transition Project will build its foundation from the current work of the Grade 13 Transitions Committee. RSCL, in partnership with the district’s EXPLORE program, is actively working with 3 students from different schools in the district, one of whom regularly attends RSCL youth programs. The goal is to offer specific supports which will fall in line with proposed new curriculum, assess outcomes and use the information to begin to develop a broader curriculum. With funding from Vancouver Foundation, the Grade 13 Transition Project will develop over a three year period. The project will combine best practices from the RSCL Youth Employment and Outreach programs and the newly launched district EXPLORE program, with support from committee partners. The project will begin with curriculum development in one or two schools with whom RSCL has existing relationships. In the second year of the project, the curriculum will be assessed, refined and will be introduced in additional schools. The final year of the project will include further refinements of the information, expansion of program delivery to include all schools in Richmond, and the opportunity to share information with community living agencies and school districts across the province. By standardizing the curriculum across the district, teachers and district staff will have the same knowledge, resulting in improved learning outcomes for students in Richmond.
$150,000.00
2016

Royal Roads University

Growing Our Futures: Community Training in Native Plant Landscaping for Adult Indigenous Students

This social innovation project will deliver an eight week community-based, culturally sensitive, hands-on training program in native plant landscaping and restoration to 16 students on the Scia'new First Nation. The training program will provide participants with the knowledge, skills and confidence needed to take advantage of employment opportunities in their community. These opportunities are especially strong given the partnership between the Scia'new Nation and Spirit Bay Developments on a 10 year plan to build a 500 + unit sustainable housing development. The project will influence systemic change towards increasing employment opportunities through incorporating Indigenous culture and traditions into education and employment training, an important element for increasing Indigenous participation in the labour market. The project will also create change through enabling community members to play a full role in a development occurring within their community. Similar developments often involve developers leasing property from First Nations and undertaking the development themselves. At Spirit Bay, ownership of the development is shared by the Trust for Sustainable Development (49%) and the Scia’new First Nation (51%) with the intention that the community meaningfully participates in the long term revenues and benefits generated. This project will provide community members with the skills to meaningfully participate in economic development on their own reserve.
$48,675.00
2016

School District #59 - Peace River South

Adult Dogwood - Credentialing Adult Learners' Life Experiences

Adult learners, even those with literacy barriers, have accumulated a vast array of skills and knowledge through their life experiences. By interviewing and collecting tangible evidence of this knowledge and experience, DCLS will submit these to School District #59 so that educational outcomes can be proven to have been met. This process identifies and values the knowledge and experience of adults, and challenges the existing educational system wherein learners are given knowledge by instruction. This approach simultaneously respects the economic and educational system of structured required learning outcomes by helping adult learners choose which method suits them the best to demonstrate competency. By using the learners past life experiences combined with adult learner-centered distance learning at their own pace and at their preferred learning location, students will successfully complete their Adult Dogwood more quickly which will provide them with the pre-requisites to enroll in Post- Secondary education to further their education desires, or have the opportunity to apply for higher paying jobs that require a grade 12 education. SD59 and DCLS want to formalize an intake process as well as create course content that will be more appropriate for adult learners.
$10,000.00
2016

School District #6 - Rocky Mountain

Kootenay-Boundary Environmental Education (KBEE) Collaborative Initiative

This social innovation project will allow for all participants in the school system - students, teachers, administrators, parents and the broader community - to work together to develop and implement a region-wide plan. This social innovation project will influence this social system in the following ways: 1) Changing how we act and what we do as a learning community by influencing the culture to move place-based experiential learning from the margins to the mainstream. 2) Improving the flow of resources by identifying opportunities for effective collaboration across the region. 3) Enabling both teachers and students to be part of the planning and decision making process, thus increasing their empowerment, engagement and ultimately their learning experience. Citizens of the 21st Century need the skills and knowledge to be able to affect positive change. With increasing environmental pressures, the need for empowering both teachers and students is more important than ever. Intentionally connecting the districts, schools, and teachers of the region through environmental education (EE) and providing common awareness, access to professional development, resources, and opportunities will enhance the experience and learning of all of our students. The implementation of KBEE outcome-based plan will both offer educators opportunities to develop professionally, and prepare young people to transition through and out of the education system.
$10,000.00
2016

School District #62 - Sooke

Supporting Education for Children/Youth in Care in Partnership - A Collaborative, Developmental Evaluation of Year 1

For the past several years, the Sooke School District (SD62) and the Ministry of Family and Child Development (MCFD) have been engaged in a leading-edge collaborative initiative, exploring ways to improve educational outcomes for children and youth in care (CYIC). Their goal is to help children in foster care and in kinship care to graduate from high school and move into post-secondary opportunities. In spring 2016, SD62 and MCFD committed to work together on an initiative to develop a school-based social work team that will focus on children and youth in care to help them be successful in school and to graduate. The partners have been guided by best/promising practice evidence from the literature, including the Fostering Success – Improving Educational Outcomes for Youth In/From Care report (Rutman & Hubberstey, 2016) and the recommendations contained therein. To support the initiative’s implementation and knowledge translation efforts – i.e., to help the SD62 and MCFD team achieve positive change and advance knowledge, policy, and practice - an ongoing evaluation and research process was sought. Through the process of conducting a developmental evaluation of the initiative’s initial years, this project will assist MCFD and SD62 to identify and subsequently measure the initiative’s milestones, successes and challenges as well as student- and systems-level/organizational outcomes. The research and evaluation component of the initiative will also produce a report on the initiative’s initial year, which can be used by communities across BC seeking to undertake collaborative action to foster educational success for children and youth in care.
$9,996.00
2016

School District #63 - Saanich

Building relationships between youth and elders to begin reconciliation at Stelly's Secondary.

1. Invite district personnel and our Indigenous Cultural Leadership student group to engage local elders and a professional artist from each band, Tsartlip, Pauquachin, Tseycum and Tsawout with the Learning Commons area. 2. Working with elders, students and teachers, the artists will identify areas of the new curriculum that resonate with them as artists and as members of the local communities. 3. Artists will brainstorm with students and create project ideas to present to staff and students. 4. Working with the art teachers, shop teachers, First Nations support staff, and cultural staff, the artists will create work plans to include student collaboration and help. We envision students painting or carving along side the artists, talking, relating, and connecting. We envision local elders and community members participating through joining in the conversation and also by popping in to see the progress on the murals etc. 5. As local stories and legends, important physical land features or historical events become alive on the walls of the Learning Commons, not only will students be engaged with the space, but also a sense of ownership, pride and belonging will be developed. 6. Importantly, creating connections between elders who suffered through the residential school experience, demonstrating to the community that school is a place where all students can belong and feel welcome, will help to heal hurts and begin a process of reconciliation in our community.
$10,000.00
2016

SFU - Centre for Dialogue

CityStudio Vancouver: Education and Community Hub

Education and Training. We have a powerful learning community of students, alumni, faculty and administrators, City staff and elected leaders, and community builders. We need to deepen their collaborative learning experiences and impact by building and practicing the skills needed to respond to the big challenges that cities face. We are helping to create the workforce that our future cities need, today. We need to build new partnerships that reflect the full diversity of learning and action that happens in the city. Community Learning Hub. We need an interactive communications tool set and strategy to enable project development that results in creating higher quality projects that can be shared. We want to increase the use of our studio space as a hub of skills building, action, changemaking and connection amongst young people, educators, city-builders and organizations. We want to more fully use our skills, experience, and space to encourage network building, experimentation, and deliver real-world projects that matter. Organisational Learning. We need a stronger organisational structure to be resilient and grow our impact. This project is key to us establishing charitable non-profit status, a Board, and good governance and management practices. Ongoing evaluation needs to become more meaningfully integrated into our work in order to more deeply understand the effectiveness and impacts of our social innovations in the communities and systems that we work.
$100,000.00
2016

Shuswap Association for Community Living

Community Building Now!

The Community Building Now project will engage people with and without disability to work together to research and identify civic issues that can be addressed to build a better community through action influencing positive civic change in Salmon Arm and area. We plan to accomplish this with Participatory Action Research bringing together a diverse group of participants to co-research what they and other community members would like to see change in their community to better meet the needs of a broad community. The project team will work collaboratively to develop methodologies to survey the community of Salmon Arm utilizing Photovoice, written surveys and interviews to gather data related to community development possibilities and analyze the results to develop actions to promote change to support the needs of a diverse community. Participants in the project will develop their personal and collective capacities by working together exchanging mentorship to increase personal capacities to effect ongoing change in their community that positively impacts the quality of life in our community. The project will create long lasting mutually beneficial social relationships; build essential community building skills and valuable roles & working partnerships that include people with intellectual & other disabilities sustaining long term, ongoing influence leaving a legacy of an inclusive community that embraces diversity, quality of life and full civic engagement for all citizen
$10,000.00
2016

Simon Fraser University - Faculty of Business Administration

Impact Fellowship Program

This 4 month program for emerging social economy leaders offers training, recognition, mentorship, coaching, tools and a peer learning community. The annual cohort of 16-25 Fellows anchors a larger strategy to build a broad, deep community of emerging social economy leaders in BC with: (a) enhanced competence and confidence to navigate complex systems innovation; (b) the relational capital to collaborate across organizational and sector boundaries; and (c) the skills and practices to sustain a career rooted in meaning and likely defined by precarious work. All of these serve to help the region address bigger, tougher social innovation challenges over time. Program Cycle 1) Recruitment (October to January) 2) Weekly learning and community sessions (Feb-June) 3) Evaluation (July-August) 4) Program adjustments and reporting (Sept) We curate issue-focused clusters, deepening peer learning and connections to mentors and experts, and allowing us to also accelerate thinking around particular issue areas over time, many of which fall within the Vancouver Foundation’s priority areas. Program alternates weekly between: 1) Skill and knowledge sessions to advance projects (ie. project dev, impact eval, bus. models, leadership) 2) Dialogues with experienced social innovation leaders to gain perspective 3) Network and community building to build relational connection and capital (retreats, events, etc) Video intro - https://vimeo.com/151053774
$105,000.00
2016

Society for Affordable Housing Education, Awareness and Development

2017 Homeless Count

The Regional Steering Committee on Homelessness (RSCH) has conducted a regional homeless count every three years since 2002. In 2014, the last regional count, a total of 2,777 homeless people were counted in Metro Vancouver. 410 homeless children and youth were counted, representing 20% of the total individuals who responded to the age question. This included 88 children who were accompanied by a parent and under 19. The actual number of youth who are homeless - or who need help and services to end and prevent homelessness - is assumed to be much higher. With regards to youth, the project's goal is to provide a more accurate assessment of the number and demographic profile of homeless youth in Metro Vancouver. Our objectives are to: 1. Engage all youth-serving agencies across the lower mainland to participate in the Homeless Count to ensure that all youth are able to ‘count themselves in’ and answer the survey questions 2. Update existing information about homeless youth in Metro Vancouver: the number, demographic profile and trends since 2002. The gathered information provides organizations and communities with the evidence-base for attaining resources to be better able to undertake meaningful youth engagement and service delivery. Reflecting on past experiences we have decided to focus all our efforts on the core function of 'counting youth' through a robust youth strategy that is focused on agencies serving youth.
$20,000.00
2016

Society for Canadian Women in Science and Technology

SCWIST – MS infinity Program (M+S = Math and Science, an infinity of choices)

Scaling the MS infinity program has the potential to change girls’ attitudes toward science, and their beliefs that there is a place for women in STEM fields. The scaling of this social innovation will start with our core programs (Program Component I). Our core programs are expanding to rural/remote communities and Aboriginal populations and therefore more girls can be reached. For Program Component II, partnered with Science World, SCWIST hosts the popular annual “Wonder Women” networking event where university age participants hear what led the Wonder Women to their STEM careers. SCWIST will hold focus groups with the MS infinity cohort to assess their needs and interests. Based on those results, the Wonder Women event will be adapted for high school. We foresee that the demand will be on access to educational/training programs; scholarships; volunteering, work experience; and resume development – resources that girls desperately need to be successful in STEM education and careers. Finally, through mentorship with women in STEM, these attitudes will be reinforced. SCWIST’s new MakePossible Mentorship Network is an on-line software platform designed to create a community that supports women in STEM. As young women emerge from high school and transition into higher education, a support network will be essential. We will grow the MakePossible network so that connections with the whole pool of MakePossible mentors will become available (Program Component III).
$10,000.00
2016

Society for Children and Youth of BC

Art for Change: Highlighting Youth Voices in Poverty Reduction Advocacy

This project aims to build momentum for the Fostering Change campaign goals through the engagement of youth in and from care in identifying and promoting systemic changes needed to reduce the incidence of poverty and its attendant vulnerabilities among BC youth leaving care. To this end we plan to facilitate a convening event with relevant FC coalition member organizations and other local organizations who have recently or are currently engaging youth in and from care in creative and artistic expression related to their experiences transitioning out of care. FC and SCY will support interested youth in being part of the team creating and animating the 2016 BC Child Poverty Report Card, to be published in November 2016. This engagement will offer participating youth opportunities to develop skills, knowledge and organizational connections, as well as experience advocating for the relevant public policy changes that would reduce poverty rates among youth leaving care. Furthermore, it would serve to uphold the youths’ right to have a say in the decisions that affect them.
$45,000.00
2016

Youth Led Staff Awareness Training

SCY will recruit and hire 4 youth in-and-out of care (2 in each of 2 communities), to partner with us in a Staff Training Project. They will identify customer service providers (ex. financial institutions) with whom they interact and who may benefit from awareness about experiences of youth in care and the importance of connections between these young people and their community. They will learn about the UNCRC and about a youth’s right to have their voice heard & valued. They will learn communication and workshop facilitation skills. They will work together and in consultation with other groups of youth, to build a training document and presentation for customer service staff to be co-facilitated by SCY and the Youth Coordinators. During past workshops with youth who are in or “aging out” of care, we learned about the common discrimination they experienced from customer service staff when those staff members learn that the youth they are serving are in foster care. For example, youth referred to financial institutions as being the main customer service providers that witness a young person’s ministry cheque, thus revealing their circumstances. One solution voiced by youth was the need for greater awareness. Groups we’ve talked to said they would be interested in training for staff. For example, Vancity said they make membership experience for youth a priority and are open to receiving youth-led staff training relating specifically to awareness building about youth in care.
$25,000.00
2016

Society Promoting Environmental Conservation (SPEC)

Climate Adaptation for Small-Scale Producers

Working with our partner organizations we will facilitate a series of workshops/tours, create extension material and create a demonstration site that focuses on priority issues (identified by farmers themselves) which consider future growing conditions as they relate to climate change. To add rigor to the workshops/tours and extension information, there will be a component of community-based research that combines academic resources with hands-on demonstration, for example: improved water monitoring/utilization techniques for multiple soil types, site specific soil quality indicators, hedgerow demonstrations, or integrated pest management. This program will explore ways in which farmers within a particular locale, who share similar site-specific challenges, can identify shared concerns and access expert help/research in addition to providing and sharing their own knowledge and advice. This community-based learning, enhanced by expert knowledge and real-world demonstrations, can provide information that is site specific, current, adaptable to changing conditions and, most importantly, shareable. In this way, farmers can access better information without huge costs and augment the collective knowledge base of farmers in their area. This project will support farmers where there is an identified need, in their efforts of responding to water, soil/nutrient and/or pest problems and will improve and increase food production in BC.
$20,000.00
2016

Pages