Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Art Starts in Schools Society

Art is essential - not extra

There is tremendous opportunity for artists and teachers to collaborate as partners in education and explore arts integration in classrooms. Our project seeks to increase the employability of artists in schools. Infusion offers training for artists to develop a complementary teaching practice, woven into their robust artistry. Teaching artists have greater opportunities to work in schools as they can speak the language of education. Infusion provides educators with professional development to expand their understanding of art in education. Our project seeks to change: - Basic routines: Artists interested in working in schools need support as navigating school culture can be intimidating and even prohibitive. Teachers teach the way they teach and need a compelling reason to explore new approaches like arts integration. - Resources: The role of artists in schools needs to be expanded in order to re-establish the flow of resources. - Beliefs: Young people are taught that art is separate from the rigor of ‘academic’ subjects. Since 2012, we have supported 97 artists to become teaching artists. This grant will help us launch the next phase, which is to deploy resources to the following: mentorship, marketing systems, advocacy and evaluation. This next phase will help us examine whether the role of art is actually expanding in the education system, and inevitably our community, and if the perception of how young people are taught to perceive art is actually changing.
$225,000.00
2017

Christ Church Cathedral

The Maundy Cafe

This project aims to initiate a cultural shift in faith-based food programs from one that favors arms-length charity to a justice-based approach that combines a focus on food and social inclusion. This project will share learnings gained in the Cathedral’s transformation from emergency food provider to facilitator of food security committed to honoring the agency, creativity, dignity, intellect, and worth of all participants. Since faith communities play a significant role in the city’s food system, this project will have direct effects in progressing towards a more just, inclusive, and participatory food system.
$225,000.00
2017

City of Surrey

All Our Relations: Indigenous Children and Families Thriving in Surrey

45% of Indigenous children in Surrey live in poverty. We are compelled to act. Multiple systems interact in complex ways to create Indigenous child poverty. Band-aid solutions will never get at the deep systemic change required. We are proposing a Social Innovation Lab process, bringing all parts of the system together to gain insight into the roots of Indigenous child poverty in Surrey and identify a range of opportunities with the potential for high impact and uptake. We will test solutions, designing, implementing and evaluating together. We envision a ripple effect of change throughout the system, ultimately creating a city where all Indigenous children and families thrive.
$225,000.00
2017

Ecotrust Canada

North Coast Innovation Lab

The North Coast Innovation Lab (NCIL) is a place-based initiative which will generate, implement, and scale innovative community designed and driven ideas for a vibrant and inclusive local economy in Prince Rupert. This project will complement the City’s vision for Prince Rupert and test how an intentionally designed innovation lab will bring capacity, resources, creativity, and solutions to bear on the serious problems facing the community. Because this is about systems change at a community level, there is potential for social innovation across a number of fronts. I.e. new partnerships between entrepreneurs, the business community, and academic institutions can change resource flows in terms of capital, human resources, and authority; and collaboration between indigenous and municipal governments can change policy and create active partnerships. The NCIL will build on learnings from the Local Economic Development (LED) Lab, an Ecotrust Canada collaboration with RADIUS SFU, place- based in Vancouver’s inner city, which was supported by the Vancouver Foundation in 2015. The theory, process and design of the NCIL is modeled on LEDLab but will scale beyond a neighbourhood level and test applicability in a municipal and northern context. As a holding place for creative collaborations, co-generating solutions, and adapting and prototyping new approaches, the Lab will play a key role in activating and actioning ideas coming forward through community engagement and visioning.
$225,000.00
2017

Faculty of Medicine Digital Emergency Medicine

Evidence Supported Self-management Enablement and Cultural Engagement (ESSENCE)

In BC, doctors use evidence-based clinical guidelines when treating patients with chronic disease. BC is undergoing major health system changes, increasing patient involvement in health care decisions and self-management. For this reason, there is a unique opportunity for multicultural communities to identify recommendations for developing culturally-appropriate evidence-based guidelines, and creating accompanying patient guides. ESSENCE aims to understand barriers and facilitators for multicultural communities to meaningfully participate in health policy discussions, while identifying a pathway for cultural adaptation of clinical practice guidelines for doctors and patients.
$225,000.00
2017

Federation of Community Social Services of British Columbia

Community Based Social Services Innovation

Many BC communities face a patchwork of government services that are neither integrated nor holistic. These often fall short of what citizens need and lack community-specific requirements. Provincial governments struggle to bridge silos of regulation, funding, and administration. Our project offers an alternative to such centrally-designed and -managed services based on four successful community pilot programs that took place over the past 2 years. By empowering existing networks of community-based organizations, local governments, and First Nations, we are establishing new ways of organizing, coordinating, and delivering social services to even the smallest and most remote BC communities.
$225,000.00
2017

Heiltsuk Tribal Council

Sacred Journeys -The resurgence of Indigenous Canoes -Travelling Exhibit

Social innovation and change intertwine in the main goals of Sacred Journeys. Sacred Journeys an engaging travelling exhibit about Indigenous canoe culture. At a fundamental level, it is about cultural revival,cultural health and cross cultural understanding. By touring15-20 major BC museums and Indigenous cultural centres over 4-5 years, it will engage and educate 10,000s of visitors from children to leaders. Appropriately, the exhibit will become a permanent display in Bella Bella, where it will continue to inspire both visitors and community members alike. Through its many teachings, metaphors, and values, the ocean going canoe was and is central to the daily life, culture, and spirituality of First Peoples of the Pacific Coast. Almost lost through the effects of colonization and technology, the Heiltsuk were instrumental in reviving this canoe culture and for the first time will share their story. Against the norm of museums, this story will be produced an told from Indigenous peoples prospective. By walking through a stylized ocean going canoe one will be able to touch a screen embedded in the symbolic supernatural paddles ; each screen will share the Indigenous people’s history, culture and stories, leading to the present, with an option to comment and ask questions. It will inspire visitors to engage in the revival of the Indigenous culture, thus leading to better health and wellness in our local communities and educating the general public.
$223,000.00
2017

Justice For Girls

Justice For Girls' Advocacy and Education Centre

JFG aims to influence systemic change in the education system by developing a Girls' Advocacy and Education Centre. This 3-year project will lay the foundation to pilot such a centre which will address the critical need for an innovative and integrated model of support, education and advocacy necessary for young women to truly transition out of poverty, homelessness, instability and violence. There are four ways that this project will influence systemic change: 1. Outreach and advocacy for girls marginalized from the school system • Targeted educational support and advocacy to facilitate school connection/reconnection and completion, freedom from violence, and adequate housing 2. Girls' Education & Empowerment • Girls rights education workshops in schools 3. Young Women’s Leadership program • 5-month full-time program providing an income, training and grade 12 or college-level course credits to young women as a pathway to graduation and leadership • young women will contribute experiential knowledge and peer support within JFG, and build the capacity of the education system by bringing their perspectives to education policies, programs and professional training 4. Public Education and Training • Professional development training for teachers, teachers in training, school counsellors and other education professionals • Public awareness campaigns • Engagement of partners, community stakeholders and champions to influence systemic change
$225,000.00
2017

Massey Theatre Society

Indigenous Arts Series (Skookum Arts Series)

The Skookum Indigenous Arts Series will celebrate some of the most dynamic Aboriginal Theatre artists, musicians, dance artists, visual and media artists from across the country. This arts celebration will help to raise awareness of First Nations talent, artistic practices, and foster cultural exchange and dialogue. With this, Massey Theatre Society is creating a new program to create a focus in its physical and cultural renewal. This celebration project will priorities inclusion of indigenous artists at the forefront as the theatre enters its 70th anniversary year and beyond. Innovation is furthered by the accompanying goals of identifying a presenting network for the series moving it beyond its host community and developing Savage Society's capacity to promote the program on an ever widening network creating opportunities to showcase Savage Society's productions along with other Aboriginal Performance works. Savage Society, an aboriginal theatre company and partner in this project has a curatorial goal is to create an arts series that brings participants into a shared experience of indigenous arts and culture in a way that is inviting, inspiring and illuminating. Performances will include dance, theatre, and music. We will also showcase Indigenous films, animation, literary and media artists and visual artists. We intend to promote socio-political dialogue as well in partnership with community organizers and institutions.
$225,000.00
2017

Network of Inner City Community Services Society

The Restoring Right Relationship Circle Training Project

Systemic racial discrimination against Indigenous peoples, resulting in extensive violence, harm, marginalization and inequity that causes institutionalized ill-health, trauma, poverty and violence for Indigenous peoples, will be countered with the growth of community-based Indigenous Restoraing Right Relationship skills and tools infrastructure amongst over 18 Indigenous-focused urban aboriginal agencies in the Vancouver Inner City. The pilot connects personal and interpersonal Indigenous restorative skills and behaviours with agency, policy and structural supports to develop a critical mass of healing, positive, restorative Indigenous and Indigenous-Ally relationships and community.
$225,000.00
2017

Pacific AIDS Network

Collective Collaboration : An Initiative to Build Capacity & Engagement to Impact BC’s HCV Landscape

People living with hepatitis C (HCV) in British Columbia want to contribute to the development of public health strategies. However, community-based organizations lack resources to ensure their involvement in leadership & decision-making. Establishing a Peer Leadership Development program to build capacity of People with Lived Experience of HCV will enable equitable participation. The foundation is the principle ‘Nothing About Us, Without Us’; it aims to articulate the rights of people living with HCV, impact policy changes & maximize the potential for reducing new infections.
$225,000.00
2017

Queer Arts Festival

UnSettling: A Vision from the Margins

This 3­-year commitment redirects established flows of money & power with strategic hires at key levels—intentional & visible placements of Queer People Of Colour (QPOC) in positions of cultural authority & focused initiatives to nurture promising emerging QPOC cultural workers into future arts leaders. QAF engages Adrian Stimson (Siksika), T’uy’tanat-­Cease Wyss (Skwxwu7mesh/Sto:Lo) & Valérie d. Walker to curate our 2017­-19 visual art exhibitions respectively, with engagements in public discourse, outreach & collaborations with diverse partners. Guest lectures at grunt, ECUAD, UBC, & SFU increase QPOC visibility in public & academic contemporary visual art discourse. Exhibition tours for queer, Indigenous & street-­involved youth, artist panels & public fora provide entry points to the often exclusive visual art milieu through direct contact with QPOC role models. The project also engages emerging QPOC arts administrator Kimberly Sayson in full­-time, multi­-year paid mentorship & an emerging exhibition preparator, cultivating well-­rounded competencies & leadership skills. By interrupting the cyclical narrative of exclusion, we increase individual experience, income & influence for QPOC curators, artists & administrators that they can leverage toward future opportunities; improve organizational resilience by expanding perspectives & networks; & shift cultural beliefs to re­vision QPOC identity as a site for expertise & creative self­-authorship rather than a mark of disenfranchisement.
$225,000.00
2017

St. Paul's Foundation of Vancouver

Expanding Peer Involvement in Substance Use Care

Our project seeks to expand the involvement of the affected population – people who use drugs (PWUD) – within the substance use system of care. We see this as important and timely given the present overdose-related public health emergency. Our goal is to affect change by: • Reducing the stigma surrounding PWUD by involving them more extensively within the system of care; • Training peer health navigators to be present on site at treatment facilities and to serve as linkages to care, thereby offering further support to those seeking substance use treatment; • Providing valuable feedback to health care providers by soliciting the feedback of PWUD on presently available treatment options.
$223,998.00
2017

T'Sou-ke First Nation

T'Sou-ke Centre for Sustainability Housing Innovation

The T’Sou-ke Centre for Sustainability Housing Innovation project aims to address the housing crisis that exists within Canada’s First Nations communities. There are multiple systemic barriers that result in common issues such as overcrowding, mould contamination, poor construction and high energy costs. While there are many innovative technologies available, we believe that social innovation is needed prior to technical innovation. We are proposing to begin with community first. Our project will embody the traditional values and principles of the people. In this way, we’re bringing back traditional values in a modern context.
$225,000.00
2017

Tides Canada Initiatives Society

re-VALUE 2.0

The binning population - characterized by self-reliance - is often overlooked and harmed despite its obvious positive environmental impact. Binners, also called urban recyclers, are an essential part of the fabric of a well-functioning city. They are a resilient group that have actively contested ideas and perspectives on their place in urban areas. Binners’ Project fosters grassroots leadership that is by and for binners. Over time, the Binners Project’s emerging initiatives are fostering the potential of this community. We work with binners to shift systems that currently leave binners at the margins of society. Re-VALUE vs. 2 enables binners to create change from the bottom up.
$225,000.00
2017

UBC - Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery

Beginning with the Seventies: Activism, Art & Archives

Our project will consist of three consecutive exhibitions, public programs and events, an online resource and book publication. Recognizing the resurgence of interest in social movements of the 70s: we will present Alexandra Bischoff’s reconstruction of the Vancouver Women’s Bookstore (1973-1996), including its inaugural inventory. Connecting with activist organizations and their archives as a resource: we will present a new collaboration by Marianne Nicolson and Althea Thauberger, supported by Union of BC Indian Chiefs researcher Robyn Laba. Recognizing that our collections do not reflect the diversity of art practices in the region: we will work with other institutions to explore our collections as a porous public resource in order to develop alternative narratives. Generating study and exchange between and among multiple generations of artists and activists: we will present new work by Dana Claxton, Ethel Gardner, Jeneen Frei Njootli and the ReMatriate Collective based on research into the Service, Office and Retail Workers’ Union of Canada (SORWUC). Embracing the idea of intergenerational citation in feminist, Indigenous and other cultural traditions: we will hire emerging artists and archivists and create opportunities to bring diverse communities together in dialogue. Together, the project destabilizes established narratives of contemporary art; opens up conversations about collections, and creates new research to leave as a legacy in the public record.
$225,000.00
2017

UBC - The Collaborating Centre for Prison Health

Trauma at the Root: Exploring Paths to Healing with Formerly Incarcerated Men

The majority of incarcerated men have experienced trauma in their lives. These trauma experiences are often at the root of substance use, mental illness, and/or violence that lead to involvement in the criminal justice system and can also negatively impact men’s ability to reintegrate into the community. However, there has been little done to explore how to support men in healing from trauma. This project will engage formerly incarcerated men in participatory health research to explore ways to improve trauma supports for both currently and formerly incarcerated men. The findings can be used develop trauma-informed approaches and influence policies and programming from the ground up.
$224,709.00
2017

Vancity Community Foundation

Code Red: Tackling B.C.'s Affordability Crisis

Squeezed by high costs for housing and child care, precarious work, and mounting debts, many younger British Columbians feel trapped and unable to reach their potential. Far too many believe that the problem must be them… That they are failures. Gen Squeeze’s work begins with a powerful socioeconomic analysis that shows young people they are not alone, and that the problem is a multi-faceted and generational “squeeze." Combining evidence-based policies, broad-based collaborations, and grassroots organizing, our Code Red project is focused on reining in sky-high housing costs in Metro Vancouver, Victoria and elsewhere, which are hitting young British Columbians particularly hard.
$225,000.00
2017

Community Impact Coop (CIC)

The CIC is a co-sharing training hub for unfunded advocacy groups of people in poverty lacking access to available resources due to poverty barriers and our charitable system. The CIC creates one entity that meets the needs of many excluded groups, redirecting the flow of established resources and building bridges across communities. The CIC Ethics of Engagement Project identifies barriers to inclusion of those with the lived experience of poverty in public-policy planning, partnering with government developing poverty reduction plans to create best practises and measurable outcomes that move people from ‘screaming’ to be heard on the outside of decision-making tables to leading the process.
$225,000.00
2017

Making ends meet: realities of low wage work and working poverty and healthy communities in BC

How does low wage poverty affect health and wellbeing in Metro Vancouver and how will policy changes impact this. There are significant policy changes impending at multiple levels including provincial and federal poverty reduction plans potential changes to how health care is funded and delivered, changes to how child care is delivered at a provincial level as well as significant increases to the minimum wage. This research will help us evaluate the impacts of these policy changes on the health and wellness of individuals, families and communities.
$225,000.00
2017

Vancouver Symphony Orchestra

VSO's New Chapter: Connecting People, Connecting Cultures

The VSO will create, experiment, produce, and disseminate 10 high-profile cultural events over the next three years chosen for topical and cultural relevancy that challenge the assumption that cultural institutions are discretionary resources for selected members of society. The adaptive power inherent in cultural institutions when they envision themselves as a civic asset will be tested via projects that focus on a broad spectrum of ages, ethnicities, socio-economic backgrounds, employing exceptional artistic talents to demonstrate the potential of social inclusion. We believe this deep and broad initiative to connect people and cultures will transform not only VSO’s current and future practice, but by sharing our findings, will transform the practice of similarly motivated institutions. VSO’s New Chapter focuses on three areas for their collective ability to foster change: 1. First Nations: Creation of a 3-year partnership of reconciliation beginning with First Nations Artist-in-Residence: Marion Newman, and ending with a multi-faceted First Nations-sourced commission to be performed in Vancouver, B.C. and Victoria, B.C. 2. Community Engagement: The “Beat of the Drum” commission will create music for all abilities; integrating deaf and disabled communities with all music lovers and genres collaborating with world-renown deaf percussionist Evelyn Glennie. 3. Gender Balance and Equality: Virtuosic female talent give voice to stories of our past, present, and future.
$225,000.00
2017

Williams Lake Indian Band

Circle of Strength Community Safety Project

Residential school and generational trauma have impacted First Nations communities and families in a range of different ways. When a family crisis occurs, or when a family is struggling, our usual approach has been to remove children from their families to protect them from further harm. This traumatizes both the children and their families. This project is about finding a different way. We want to work together with all the services in our community identify and reach out to families who are struggling sooner, provide support and resources to help them resolve the challenges they face, keep their children and the community safe, and support health family development.
$224,720.00
2017