Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Aunt Leah's Independent Lifeskills Society

Community Sourcing: Crowd-Sourcing New Allies & Resources for Youth In-And-From Care

‘Community Sourcing’ creates multiple legacy projects to build upon and carry forward the work of the Fostering Change initiative through a bi-annual youth-led and youth-organized “crowdsourcing” dinner. Dinner attendees pay an entrance fee to get dinner and a vote. Attendees hear presentations on community-building projects from youth in-and-from foster care. At the event, attendees eat, talk, share resources, and vote on the project they think benefits the community and youth-from-care the most. At the end of the night, ballots are counted and the winning presenter goes home with all money raised (around $2,000) to carry out the project. Thus, youth in-and-from foster care raise money, build community support and get connections to local resources that can help carry out their project. This Community Sourcing dinner occurs twice a year with opportunities for presenters to receive speaking & engagement training in preparation for their presentation. Two youth in-and-from foster care are hired to run the project, including organizing and building capacity of presenters, promotion of the bi-annual dinners, plus sourcing sponsors and supporters. The premise of this project is largely borrowed from SOUP, a model of community project ‘dinner’ crowd-sourcing that has proven successful around the world. People want to engage and participate in this type of community-building activity and this project opens up this important opportunity to youth in-and-from foster care.

Realwheels Society

Act of Faith

We believe that theatre has the power and capacity to bring about social change, through the empathic understanding that results from audiences’ experience of and exposure to the ‘other’. Despite comprising approximately 14% of the Canadian population, one of the challenges of living with a disability is simply being seen. This project will challenge the stereotypical experience of people who use wheelchairs as invisible to society and culture. We propose that the Vancouver Foundation support the development and production of a new play. We have commissioned award-winning playwright Janet Munsil to write ACT OF FAITH, a play inspired by the true story of the inexplicable recovery from paraplegia by a Vancouver teacher/dancer, after 13 years of life in a wheelchair. We will contract a cast comprised of a combination of performers with disabilities and able-bodied performers. Foundation funding will support laboratory exploration of a new, hybrid art form and its realization in production. By employing mixed-ability (or ‘integrated’) wheelchair dance as a means of storytelling, we will find alternatives to the usual pattern of storytelling, a departure from habitual forms. Our process will test the capacity for integrated dance to challenge stereotypes of disability as a negative experience. This is a compelling and innovative way to push the boundaries of theatre, and has the correlated benefit of shifting audience perceptions of disability in a completely new way.

The Bloom Group Community Services Society

Vancouver Mental Health and Addictions Systems - Collective Impact Project

The Vancouver MH & Addictions Collective Impact project is an initiative to strengthen the care systems for individuals living with mental health and/or substance use disorders. The project’s role in achieving reduced levels and frequency of crisis is not to directly deliver supports, but to better define, coordinate and integrate the work of the diverse partners providing services; from healthcare to housing, from education to law enforcement, and from government agencies to community groups. The project’s premise is that by creating a system that works in unison towards a shared set of measurable goals, future policy changes and new investments in services will have greater impact.

Theatre Conspiracy

Victim Impact

Victim Impact examines the Samji Ponzi scheme involving $110 million & over 200 victims – mainly the elderly in Surrey’s South Asian community.  Over two years, the project will fuse investigative journalism, community engagement, media and inter-disciplinary theatre. With direct community engagement in the creation, the project is a catalyst for education and outreach.. Engagement consist of: Research: Ongoing process attending court trials/hearings; interviewing victims & key players including lawyers, regulators, psychologists and victim support groups; sourcing/ analyzing of documents (transcripts; judgments; media, legal & accounting reports); research into financial law and practices.   Creation: October 2017 workshop - two weeks with artists of diverse practices, staged reading with community feedback session.   Podcasts: Five 35-45 min. episodes of interviews and dramatizations: Through the Samji case examine the causes of fraud; educate & provide context to recognize fraud; destigmatize victims; facilitate support networks; encourage participation in future episodes, workshops and theatre attendance.   Performance/ Events: Workshop Production Performance (PTC, 2017) and The Cultch Premiere Performance (Spring, 2018) will include community activities such as: Open rehearsals, post-show talks, a facilitated public forum by experts on financial law; facilitating dialogues with victim services; address the social stigma & its effects on families/ communities.