Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Access to Media Education Society

DisPLACEmeant

Providing an avenue of expression for youth with firsthand experience of displacement, this program honours their lived experiences while supporting efforts to enrich public understanding of the contributing factors + consequences of displacement + forced migration. The production phase of the program will see 24 youth creating 6 new (dis)placed-based digital stories, and up to 24 vlogs. The outreach phase will see participants publically screening and presenting their work, creating / facilitating workshops + online resources designed to increase awareness and prompt dialogue in schools + beyond. Featuring youth-made videos, lesson plans, background info + activities, the resources developed will: • Enable newcomer + indigenous youth to see themselves/their experiences reflected in the school curriculum, while easing some of the burden of explanation off of them. • Assist educators, students, + support workers in: (i) unlearning biases, dispelling misconceptions, challenging racialized violence, and institutionalized hate; (ii) learning about circumstances forcing Indigenous, refugee and newcomer students to leave their homeland, challenges faced in the process, and possible ways forward. The learning/unlearning that these resources facilitate are essential aspects of creating educational environments that are inclusive, support marginalized youth in “transitioning through and out of the education system”, and enhance their potential for broader civic engagement
$75,000.00
2017

Bard on the Beach Theatre Society

Bard on the Beach - Community Diversity

Our proposed project is an overall Community Diversity Strategy that is aligned with three categories: 1. Training/Employment: We will expand our Artistic Associates by adding two new positions to include more gender and culturally diverse voices. Bard’s Associates are involved in aspects of artistic planning including programming, casting and development activities. These new Associates will identify new projects, build new relationships, and work on increasing diversity in our audience. In addition, we will hire cultural consultants for specific productions to protect cultural sensitivities. We will increase the Bard Studio workshops and train more diverse performers, increasing the number of qualified artists to be employed on our stage and across Canada. Bard’s artistic team will travel throughout Canada to identify and collaborate with more diverse artists. 2. Education: We will add additional Bard in the Classroom and Neighbourhood workshops (provided for free); develop a Distance Education Streaming Education component; and train more Teaching Artists to establish a more diverse roster of teachers for all our programs. We will host and engage in community wide forums to discuss diversity issues, share our findings and encourage others to be more inclusive of many perspectives and voices. 3. Development of New Work: We will develop diverse plays from different cultures through the Bard Lab Program and focus on engaging more gender diverse playwrights and creators.
$73,875.00
2017

Britannia Community Services Centre Society

Thingery - A Lending Library of Things

Equipment lending libraries are proven models for reducing a neighbourhood's ecological footprint. Despite long established lending library organizations in most Canadian cities, lending libraries struggle to scale. We've worked with three neighbourhoods in Vancouver to show that there's an appetite for more lending libraries that are located directly in neighbourhoods. Our project will pilot three equipment lending libraries, called a Thingery, in shipping containers and through donations of underutilized equipment, provide community members with access to equipment that they don't ever need to own.
$75,000.00
2017

Fraser Region Aboriginal Friendship Centre Association

Indigenous Youth Affecting Change

Under an Indigenous youth led process, 4 new youth facilitators will begin training on an Indigenous cultural competency based learning tool which they will learn and then deliver and share under a social enterprise business plan. The social enterprise will generate revenues to address the needs of Indigenous youth aging out of care. Through a partnership table including academia, a series of workshops from a cultural competency curriculum will be delivered by youth facilitators to audiences on colonization and steps needed towards reconciliation. The workshops will be presented to municipal & provincial government departments, to public schools, for profit sector and special interests groups. Within the presentations will be an overview of issues affecting Indigenous youth and will present suggestions on how to better serve Indigenous youth through changes to policy, where to place enhanced resourcing for community based services and contribute to awareness on gaps in research. With the involvement of youth and community, a new youth position will be created to guide the social enterprise activities contributing to a legacy of supports for Indigenous youth aging out of care in Surrey. This project will create awareness of urban Indigenous issues, provide Indigenous youth with an advocacy voice and will contribute to a better understanding of the needs and supports needed to reduce the over representation of Indigenous children in care. Our youth are engaged and prepared.
$75,000.00
2017

Lu'ma Native Housing Society

Traditional Healers/Elders Project at Lu'ma Medical Centre

The disparity in health for Indigenous people is no longer acceptable. In order to improve health outcomes we must reconcile how health care is delivered to Indigenous peoples. who have experienced a much higher amount of consistent trauma over long periods of time from systemic discrimination and removal of children. Traditional Healers/Elders can engage Indigenous patients to actively participate in healing their body, spirit, mind and emotions to restore their health. Culturally integrated health care is innovative because the teachings and practices of ancient traditional healing is applied to empower individuals & families to solve health challenges today.
$74,983.00
2017

North Shore Disability Resource Centre Association (NSDRC)

InclusionWorks North Shore

This innovative program assists and prepares young adults with developmental disabilities to transition from an inclusive high school experience to a more independent adult community based life, family governed and community supported. Not agency run, it unfolds the way life does, with skill enhancing activities in community settings (libraries, community centres, businesses, work sites, recreation facilities). Young adults participate in a “campus” type of experience that is flexible and serves a wide range of skill development, both part time or full time or on a “one course at a time” basis. Highly skilled coaches and educators provide support and instruction. CLBC currently funds some programs through North Shore agencies, however they are somewhat limited in nature, often operating in more self-contained settings outside the general community. Even those limited programs regularly face budget cuts and it is time to find a new, sustainable way to provide the education, social, recreational and employment skills programs that foster the growth young adults achieved during their high school years. Because these groups can be small and flexible, programming needs can change as needs of participants change, and they can be life-long learners and contributors to their communities through employment and/or volunteer work where they will be known by all its citizens, not just those with disabilities. This innovative and inclusive model is sustainable, economical and replicable.
$75,000.00
2017

Powell Street Festival Society

Advocacy and Outreach Through Arts-based Community Development at WePress

This project will build on the ongoing work of PSFS to have a year-round presence in the DTES, to link the history of Japanese Canadian (JC) expulsion from the DTES during WWII with challenges of displacement faced by current residents, and to be a committed partner with residents and groups working in the neighbourhood. This partnership combines PSFS’ historical perspective and activity with the goals and operational infrastructure of WePress Community Arts Space, which houses a variety of art-making platforms, and welcomes people marginalized by class, sexuality, gender, race, culture, disability, mental health, and addictions. The social innovation lies in the ability to run paid workshops and sell merchandise to those who can afford them in order to generate revenue that allows PSFS and WePress to provide job and economic opportunities for low-income and marginalized people, teach new skills through free and low-cost workshops, provide a welcoming space and access to unique equipment for art-making and community-building, support DTES social justice groups, and promote JC art, culture, and history and the work of PSFS. In this way, PSFS and WePress can bring together people from diverse income levels to interact, make art together, and learn a little about each others’ lives. Furthermore, PSFS will continue to contribute to the development of a new independent social justice arts organization in the DTES and its long-term survival.
$75,000.00
2017

Raincoast Conservation Foundation

Restoring Governance for Salmon Conservation in the Lower Fraser River and Estuary

This project addresses the failure of governments and agencies to protect salmon habitat in the Lower Fraser River and Estuary. This failure has come at the detriment of globally significant salmon runs and the First Nations, local communities, economies and other wildlife that rely on these fish. A huge opportunity now exists to test governance and funding models for delivering a First Nations and community-lead initiative that envisions salmon resilience in the Lower Fraser. Using salmon as the indicator for freshwater sustainability, an initiative focused on habitat conservation will guide planning, restoration and management, facilitating recovery of a degraded river and its salmon.
$70,000.00
2017

Simon Fraser University - Faculty of Environment

Low Carbon Resilience: Practitioners as Drivers For Sustainable Communities

Climate change requires us to reduce emissions (mitigation) and prepare for impacts such as flooding, sea level rise and heatwaves (adaptation). To date, climate mitigation and adaptation have been planned separately, but it's clear there are major benefits to integrating them - an approach called low carbon resilience (LCR). As we shift to a low carbon economy and begin upgrading infrastructure to withstand climate impacts, we can save time and money using LCR approaches. This is good news for ecosystems, which are also challenged by climate change, as their health is central to innovative LCR approaches. This project facilitates and supports the role of professionals as LCR champions.
$75,000.00
2017

The Arthritis Society, BC & Yukon

Electronic Arthritis Triage Strategy (EATS)

The EATS Program serves to reduce barriers to treatment for people with arthritis. It will ensure appropriate treatment for their properly diagnosed arthritis by the appropriate healthcare professionals (HCPS), in a timely way that will help to reduce disease progression and disability. Earlier treatment will reduce the need for more invasive treatments including medications with higher side-effects and the need for surgery. This will be achieved through the development and implementation of an online triage tool that uses standardized examination questions where the responses are processed through a decision support system (based on BC Rheumatology guidelines) to determine the best route to treating their arthritis. EATS will generate a report summary of the patient responses combined with other key patient data from the healthcare system. This will be accessible by the primary care provider, rheumatologist and/or allied HCP. The result is the expedited referrals of high priority patients to rheumatologists, which improves specialist access, increases positive health outcomes for patients due to early disease intervention and reduces the need for costly medications. This will generate significant cost savings for the MoH. Our partnerships with healthcare professional bodies (rheumatologists, GPs & allied HCPs) will assist in the adoption and utilization of EATS.
$75,000.00
2017

University of Victoria School of Social Work

Engaged research on implementations in response to overdose

This current proposal builds on a Vancouver Foundation Develop Grant (UNR15-0134) held by Wallace (with Pauly) in which we were immersed in community when drug overdose become a public health crisis and our results informing responses. Also, a NSERC Engage grant supported a unique partnership and the creation of a spectrometer drug testing instrument by the Co-investigator (Hore) with Vincent at STS Pharmacy. The advancement is novel due to the cost-effectiveness of the invention which allows for unprecedented scale-up and integration. Most recently, Wallace, Hore and Vincent were successful in an application to the Canadian Foundation for Pharmacy’s Innovation program to implement this technology, pilot drug checking and build capacity in Victoria BC. Our proposal pairs the piloting of this innovation in drug checking with community-based research through the partnership with AIDS Vancouver Island and its Street College program. Specifically, we will engage people who use drugs (PWUD) in research that can inform how drug checking can effectively be implemented and integrated in harm reduction. There is a lack of knowledge on many aspects of implementation such as; who may use or not use such services, what barriers exist to using the services, how individuals will respond to test results, how drug checking could impact the toxic illicit drug market, what opportunities drug checking may hold for reducing stigma, increasing access to supports, and develop relationships.
$70,000.00
2017

UVIC - School of Public Health & Social Policy

Reflecting Back, Looking Forward: Storytelling to Address HIV/AIDS Across British Columbia

HIV/AIDS persists despite advancements in HIV treatment and prevention due to persistent social inequities and stigma. In the early response to HIV/AIDS, affected communities banded together in fierce activism. Now, the earliest generation of HIV/AIDS survivors and their allies are passing away due to older age and suicide. We are loosing their stories and memories, which embody community resilience. Our novel community-based participatory oral history research project will document the experiences of these early HIV/AIDS survivors in a digital archive in order to preserve and share their cultural memories inter-generationally, re-invigorate prevention, and help eradicate HIV/AIDS in BC.
$75,000.00
2017