Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Access to Media Education Society

DisPLACEmeant

Providing an avenue of expression for youth with firsthand experience of displacement, this program honours their lived experiences while supporting efforts to enrich public understanding of the contributing factors + consequences of displacement + forced migration. The production phase of the program will see 24 youth creating 6 new (dis)placed-based digital stories, and up to 24 vlogs. The outreach phase will see participants publically screening and presenting their work, creating / facilitating workshops + online resources designed to increase awareness and prompt dialogue in schools + beyond. Featuring youth-made videos, lesson plans, background info + activities, the resources developed will: • Enable newcomer + indigenous youth to see themselves/their experiences reflected in the school curriculum, while easing some of the burden of explanation off of them. • Assist educators, students, + support workers in: (i) unlearning biases, dispelling misconceptions, challenging racialized violence, and institutionalized hate; (ii) learning about circumstances forcing Indigenous, refugee and newcomer students to leave their homeland, challenges faced in the process, and possible ways forward. The learning/unlearning that these resources facilitate are essential aspects of creating educational environments that are inclusive, support marginalized youth in “transitioning through and out of the education system”, and enhance their potential for broader civic engagement
$75,000.00
2017

Arts in Action Society

Groundswell Grow

Currently, we are working with our alumni and community partners to plan and design Groundswell Grow. We will launch Groundswell Grow with a weekly marketplace on Granville Island in summer 2017. It will provide living inspiration for how to do business that benefits community, and give young ventures access to market, real estate, and an extended community support network. Advanced programs will include mentoring and market stand training, and support services for the early stage social venture community with the help of our community partners. As successful young entrepreneurs “graduate” out of the marketplace incubator stage they will populate the city with social businesses that work for communities and become mentors for new Groundswell Grow participants. The ecosystem will expand to include other local, young, social ventures who get access to the marketplace and a supportive network of training, mentoring and venture services. The marketplace setting will increase opportunities for public outreach and education around community based ventures and social entrepreneurship. This model will change the flow of resources through the business system: more small scale, unlikely entrepreneurs will have the knowledge and access to financial and social support to be able to create successful social ventures that provide them with meaningful employment. And, more businesses will exist that add social and environmental value to communities, not just monetary value.
$150,000.00
2017

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

A Reggio Emilia-Inspired Early Learning Centre for BC

Our project is to create a Reggio-based Learning Centre at Frog Hollow that will train and support child care centres and school teachers across BC to implement the Reggio Emilia approach. Activities will include tours of our childcare programs, introductory presentations on the Reggio approach, the production of a practice-based training video, both customized and general workshop presentations, consulting services for centres and teachers, web-based promotion of the Reggio approach and our services, and support for networking and mutual support between centres implementing the Reggio approach. We will begin by focusing on Metro Vancouver and eventually offer training and consultation across the province. There are 102,908 child care spaces in BC for ages 0-12, which is approximately 20% of the total number of children. Our goal is to make the Reggio Emilia approach available to as many of the child care centres as possible. Scaling out the Reggio Emilia approach to centres across BC will result in increased school readiness along the EDI vulnerability areas, a closer alignment with the BC Early Learning Framework, and assist with the transition of children to the school system as the Reggio Emilia approach is both consistent with and complimentary to BC's New Curriculum. We anticipate a change in the early learning system in both the routines and beliefs of the system. The Learning Centre will become a social enterprise and will eventually become self-sustaining.
$10,000.00
2017

Cheakamus Foundation for Environmental Learning

Creating Futures Together

Strengthening Futures Together is a collaborative initiative to develop a community plan to address barriers faced by indigenous youth to reduce the rate of suicide, achieve post-secondary success and secure meaningful, stable, and well-paid employment. Not only does this dramatically increase the health and well-being of individuals and families; addressing systemic barriers creates stronger communities and contributes to a more innovative and stronger economy.
$10,000.00
2017

Check Your Head: The Youth Global Education Network

Youth Building a New Economy

The goal of this project is to engage young people in re-imagining our current economic system and to give them the tools to build it, while also strengthening their economic independence. To realize this goal, Check Your Head will deliver an economic justice leadership program, that builds on our successful model of peer-led youth engagement. Youth aged 17-24 will be trained as peer educators to reach to other youth through workshops, events and actions that foster socially innovative economic change. The project focus areas that will help to advance this social innovation are: 1) Making a living (skills development and employment opportunities for youth participating in the project); 2) Making most of the available resources (financial literacy, learning about informal and sharing economies, and the ways to utilize them for Metro Vancouver youth); 3) Creating a better economic system (contributing to systemic change through youth-led policy and advocacy). These areas are mutually reinforcing and will create a comprehensive multi-level effort that will make a difference for youth in Metro Vancouver. All project activities will create opportunities for youth to find solutions around these three broad areas. As with all our work, we will be using an anti-oppressive and intersectional framework, which recognizes that individuals face systemic discrimination and barriers based on class, race, gender and other factors that intersect in complex ways.
$10,000.00
2017

Ecotrust Canada

North Coast Innovation Lab

The North Coast Innovation Lab (NCIL) is a place-based initiative which will generate, implement, and scale innovative community designed and driven ideas for a vibrant and inclusive local economy in Prince Rupert. This project will complement the City’s vision for Prince Rupert and test how an intentionally designed innovation lab will bring capacity, resources, creativity, and solutions to bear on the serious problems facing the community. Because this is about systems change at a community level, there is potential for social innovation across a number of fronts. I.e. new partnerships between entrepreneurs, the business community, and academic institutions can change resource flows in terms of capital, human resources, and authority; and collaboration between indigenous and municipal governments can change policy and create active partnerships. The NCIL will build on learnings from the Local Economic Development (LED) Lab, an Ecotrust Canada collaboration with RADIUS SFU, place- based in Vancouver’s inner city, which was supported by the Vancouver Foundation in 2015. The theory, process and design of the NCIL is modeled on LEDLab but will scale beyond a neighbourhood level and test applicability in a municipal and northern context. As a holding place for creative collaborations, co-generating solutions, and adapting and prototyping new approaches, the Lab will play a key role in activating and actioning ideas coming forward through community engagement and visioning.
$225,000.00
2017

Family Support Institute of B.C.

Navigating Social and Sexual Relationships

Young adults with disabilities have systemically been excluded in accessing sexuality education tailored to diverse learning needs. Intentional community based sexuality education opportunities for youth with disabilities is necessary to address conflict among educators, service providers and parents about what and how to teach which can leave youth without any sexuality education. Developing healthy sexual expression provides an opportunity to be fully ‘seen’ and communities can address stigma related to recognizing individuals with disabilities as sexual beings. Community based education provides meaningful interaction while supporting responsive, inclusive and welcoming communities.
$10,000.00
2017

Frontier College

Community Literacy Catalyst in Pacheedaht First Nation

Frontier College’s CLC program builds local capacity and provides innovative, year-round literacy support that is 1) responsive to local needs, and 2) integrated within existing programs and services. Frontier College hires a local community member (the CLC) to work closely with an existing Frontier College staff member, who provides training and mentorship. Together, staff conduct an initial needs assessment among community stakeholders to determine priorities and opportunities strengthened literacy skills. The CLC then works with community members to design and run a series of pilot activities that respond to local culture, heritage, and community conditions. Gradually, Frontier College shifts from on-site training and mentorship to remote support and advice, as the community takes ownership of programming. Frontier College works in collaboration with host communities – we go where we are needed, and where we are invited. The CLC program represents a new approach to a social and educational system in which Indigenous rights, knowledge, language, and culture are at the centre of community-driven education initiatives. Furthermore, the CLC program significantly enhances a host community’s resource capacity.
$147,800.00
2017

Hope for the Nations

Food for Thought

Many children live in a food insecure home and are at risk of going to school hungry. We know that a hungry child is more likely to act out and less likely to achieve their personal and academic potential. We currently provide breakfast to 1500 students a day in 30 schools in the central okanagan. We want to use the local agriculture system more in our programming to offer more nutritious food to students, to help build a just, sustainable food system for all, and to build capacity in students and schools. Having access to healthy food will help children learn better. Children will be better educated, have more opportunities to succeed, and become agents of change.
$9,740.00
2017

Justice For Girls

Justice For Girls' Advocacy and Education Centre

JFG aims to influence systemic change in the education system by developing a Girls' Advocacy and Education Centre. This 3-year project will lay the foundation to pilot such a centre which will address the critical need for an innovative and integrated model of support, education and advocacy necessary for young women to truly transition out of poverty, homelessness, instability and violence. There are four ways that this project will influence systemic change: 1. Outreach and advocacy for girls marginalized from the school system • Targeted educational support and advocacy to facilitate school connection/reconnection and completion, freedom from violence, and adequate housing 2. Girls' Education & Empowerment • Girls rights education workshops in schools 3. Young Women’s Leadership program • 5-month full-time program providing an income, training and grade 12 or college-level course credits to young women as a pathway to graduation and leadership • young women will contribute experiential knowledge and peer support within JFG, and build the capacity of the education system by bringing their perspectives to education policies, programs and professional training 4. Public Education and Training • Professional development training for teachers, teachers in training, school counsellors and other education professionals • Public awareness campaigns • Engagement of partners, community stakeholders and champions to influence systemic change
$225,000.00
2017

Kwantlen Polytechnic University Foundation

Including All Citizens Project: Inclusive Post Secondary Education for Students with Disabilities

As with all employment rates, education is key to getting and keeping a job. The low rates of employment for people with ID is reflected in the low rates of post-secondary training and education. More than half of people with intellectual disabilities reported experiencing barriers to training. Almost 42% of people with ID received work-related training; however, 25 % reported that the training they received was insufficient and discouraged them from looking for work. On-the-job training was most common among people with ID compared to classroom-based training. Post-secondary education for all students can be a critical factor in finding and keeping employment as well as offering the ability to create social connections and community engagement. IACP will influence systemic change in the following ways: (1) provide a successful pilot as a model of inclusive programming; (2) create a teacher’s guide to assist other instructors in transforming their teaching to reach a wide range of learners; (3) identify policy barriers located within the educational system; and, (4) provide leadership and encourage innovative pedagogical practices. The pedagogical foundation of this project has far reaching potential including, but not limited to, programs that offer English as Alternative Language (ESL) services. IACP also has the potential to influence pedagogical reform in secondary education.
$117,875.00
2017

Learning Disabilities Association of British Columbia - Vancouver Chapter

The Better Futures Project

Those with learning disabilities (LD’s) often have an above average intelligence, however because of the way their brain processes information they struggle to learn in the same way as others. As a result, the employment rate of adults with an LD is less than half the employment rate of those without. Additionally, often employers haven’t been educated in how to support someone with an LD and so this acts as a further barrier to employment. LDAV have therefore worked with partners to create a new project outline that addresses both sides of this issue. LDAV will be working to develop the content of the program further and test out the model to help more people with LD’s gain employment.
$10,000.00
2017

Mount Currie Band

Ucwalmícwts Voices Immersion Project

There are 2 parts to Ucwalmícwts Voices Immersion Project. Part 1 addresses our most vulnerable populations: infants, children and at-risk teens. They are supported by their parents, teachers and Elders. We would like to activate the following programs: 1. Daycare Learning Nest program with Elders, teachers and parents. 2. Elementary school immersion program (K-Grade 12) with Elders, teachers and mentees/interns 3. Storytelling program for at-risk teens 4. Mentor-Apprentice program for at-risk teens Part 2 addresses the community at large, including, to some extent, all Canadians and visitors. This ensures cross-sector outreach, envelopment and reinforcement of Ucwalmícwts. 1. Chiefs, Council and Band administration take Ucwalmícwts courses. 2. Employers receive incentives to send employees for paid Ucwalmícwts courses. 3. Ucwalmícwts is used during recreation & leisure programs, community gatherings, games nights, and more. 4. Mount Currie Band renews all way-finding and building signage to be bilingual (Ucwalmícwts/phoenetic English). This exposes community members, visitors and all Canadians to the language.
$25,000.00
2017

North Shore Disability Resource Centre Association (NSDRC)

InclusionWorks North Shore

This innovative program assists and prepares young adults with developmental disabilities to transition from an inclusive high school experience to a more independent adult community based life, family governed and community supported. Not agency run, it unfolds the way life does, with skill enhancing activities in community settings (libraries, community centres, businesses, work sites, recreation facilities). Young adults participate in a “campus” type of experience that is flexible and serves a wide range of skill development, both part time or full time or on a “one course at a time” basis. Highly skilled coaches and educators provide support and instruction. CLBC currently funds some programs through North Shore agencies, however they are somewhat limited in nature, often operating in more self-contained settings outside the general community. Even those limited programs regularly face budget cuts and it is time to find a new, sustainable way to provide the education, social, recreational and employment skills programs that foster the growth young adults achieved during their high school years. Because these groups can be small and flexible, programming needs can change as needs of participants change, and they can be life-long learners and contributors to their communities through employment and/or volunteer work where they will be known by all its citizens, not just those with disabilities. This innovative and inclusive model is sustainable, economical and replicable.
$75,000.00
2017

Our Community Bikes (OCB)

PEDAL Bicycle Industry Training (PBIT) Program

The PBT Program is a unique pre-employment and life skills training program for youth and people with barriers to employment. Through low-cost tuition and subsidized programs, PBMT Program will empower people to become bike mechanics and a part of the broader cycling community. Delivered in a community-bike shop setting through an anti-oppression education model the students will receive both technical and life skills training to be job ready for employment or participation in the bicycle repair industry. The PBIT Program is a unique pre-employment and life skills training program for youth and people with barriers to employment. Through low-cost tuition, PBIT Program will empower trainees to become employed in the bicycle industry and a part of the broader cycling community. Delivered in a community-bike shop setting through an anti-oppression education model, the students will receive both technical and life skills training, to be job ready for employment or participation in the bicycle industry. Technical training will focus on basic and advanced bicycle repair knowledge and will give students a basic understanding of a bicycle retail operation. Life skills training will encourage students to use effective communication and to present themselves as confident and forthright individuals. Students will gain skills in pre-employment preparations, leadership, peer support, and foundations in social justice. PEDAL will work with the bicycle industry to provide i
$10,000.00
2017

Potluck Cafe Society

Knack

Our aim is to create a diversity of income-generating opportunities that fit the diverse needs of residents of the DTES. We want to build an innovative framework that recognizes employment-related skills and qualities that residents of the DTES have gained through unconventional paths that don’t usually get highlighted on a typical resume. We hope to assist individuals who want to move along the employment continuum and meet them where they’re at. For the next phase, we want to test our badging framework with external agencies and build capacity within the system to facilitate greater mobility for individuals who are advancing along the income generation continuum. Through our initial testing, we saw that recognizing individuals with badges for their earned achievements often empowers them with greater self-efficacy and inspires them to aim higher. We’ve also seen that smaller, task-based work opportunities get them more acquainted with employer-employee relationships and increases their confidence in their own ability to re-enter the workforce. At the core of this social innovation is a desire to realign resource flow around knowledge (training) and money (income). We see a ripple effect for basic routines, policies and beliefs that are preventing the widespread adoption of Social Hiring. Our goal is to recognize and champion the strengths and abilities of our program participants, and support the creation of a more inclusive, accessible and resilient local economy.
$150,000.00
2017

Sunshine Coast Community Services

Improving socio-economic outcomes for adults living with mental illness

This project will bring together the Food Bank and Arrowhead Club House to test a volunteer and employment training initiative for adults living with mental illness. A key component will be the implementation of organizational change in the structure of the Food Bank to incorporate a capacity building training component for ADLMI that could lead to employment in the community and will incorporate long term sustainable employment in the food bank for adults living with mental illness. The results of this pilot will provide ongoing support to potential employers building our communities capacity to support this population and shift the communities perception of the abilities and positive contributions ADLMI can make to the health and well being of the community. Participants will have an increased sense of self worth, increased income, references for other employment and will have the skills and support to seek employment. Local employers, support services and adults living with mental illness will be engaged in workshops and dialogues to discuss the barriers and benefits of employing this population. These activities will shift their perception of ADLMI and increase their ability to support this population. In addition the new volunteers and employees will increase the Food Banks capacity to serve the community and to better serve users of the Food Bank who have Mental illness.
$49,040.00
2017

Tidal Elements Whole School Society

Returning to Place: Reintegrating Land-based Learning and Healing into Haida Gwaii Youth Programming

Land-based programming has been identified as a priority on Haida Gwaii by education, mental health, health care, and justice organizations, and most importantly, by youth themselves. Despite this, participation in on-the-land programming is declining and there is no sustainable funding for existing programs. A diverse group of organizations and community members across Haida Gwaii are invested in working collaboratively with youth to investigate the barriers to participation and rethink how we can effectively embed land-based programming into the way we educate and provide services to youth on Haida Gwaii, nurturing a life long, resilient relationship to land and place.
$10,000.00
2017

University of Victoria - Faculty of Law

Human Rights within Indigenous Law: A collaborative toolkit for educators

We want to support Indigenous laws’ capacity to be applied, critically evaluated, openly debated, and adapted or changed as needed. Our vision is for Indigenous laws to be living and in use on the ground - to be researched, taught and theorized about just as other great legal traditions of the world are. Revitalizing Indigenous laws and building tools for engagement, such as this Indigenous Human Rights Toolkit, is essential for re-building healthy Indigenous citizenries and creating more respectful and symmetrical relationships across legal traditions in Canada. These are necessary steps to build and maintain robust reconciliation within and between peoples, now and for future generations.
$10,000.00
2017