Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Carving on the Edge Festival Society

The Nuu-chah-nulth Living Archive Project

We propose to increase the number of people who participate in artistic and cultural offerings by creating a local cultural archive created by Nuu-chah-nulth people. We will gather a Working Group of community members already actively involved in Nuu-chah-nulth cultural knowledge, renewal, history, or art. This group will provide consultation to ensure we network with all of our existing resources and to ensure that the archive is accessible to the larger Nuu-chah-nulth community and is beneficial to wide range of community projects. They will guide the work of the Project Coordinator, Project Archivist and the team of Youth Archivists. Through the Carving on the Edge Festival we will feature guest speakers involved in community archival, museum or repatriation projects in order to stimulate a larger discussion in the west coast carving community. The end outcome will be a Nuu-chah-nulth Living Archive with information on the Nuu-chah-nulth collections held in many worldwide museums. This may include photographs, audio recordings, documents, and displays. Some resources may be flagged as culturally sensitive and will only be available within the Nuu-chah-nulth community and will be protected according to the protocols set out by the Living Archive Working Group. A permanent installation of the components of the Nuu-chah-nulth Living Archive that can be shared publicly and we will hosted yearly at the Carving on the Edge Festival.
$142,000.00
2017

Cetus Research & Conservation Society

Expanding Killer Whale Protection

The effects of living in a heavily industrialized,urbanized area & a massive increase in vessel traffic (as well as the live-capture business which killed/captured at least 47) has put intense pressure on KWs. With a complete picture of vessel interactions, this project will enhance their immediate well being and contribute to bringing about the systemic change necessary for their survival. The southern resident population has fluctuated since the 70's (hitting a known high of 98) but is now at 78, with the loss of 6 individuals in the last year. Their crisis is caused entirely by human activities. Only meaningful action on our part will bring about the conditions needed for them to survive.
$45,000.00
2017

Cheakamus Foundation for Environmental Learning

Creating Futures Together

Strengthening Futures Together is a collaborative initiative to develop a community plan to address barriers faced by indigenous youth to reduce the rate of suicide, achieve post-secondary success and secure meaningful, stable, and well-paid employment. Not only does this dramatically increase the health and well-being of individuals and families; addressing systemic barriers creates stronger communities and contributes to a more innovative and stronger economy.
$10,000.00
2017

Check Your Head: The Youth Global Education Network

Youth Building a New Economy

The goal of this project is to engage young people in re-imagining our current economic system and to give them the tools to build it, while also strengthening their economic independence. To realize this goal, Check Your Head will deliver an economic justice leadership program, that builds on our successful model of peer-led youth engagement. Youth aged 17-24 will be trained as peer educators to reach to other youth through workshops, events and actions that foster socially innovative economic change. The project focus areas that will help to advance this social innovation are: 1) Making a living (skills development and employment opportunities for youth participating in the project); 2) Making most of the available resources (financial literacy, learning about informal and sharing economies, and the ways to utilize them for Metro Vancouver youth); 3) Creating a better economic system (contributing to systemic change through youth-led policy and advocacy). These areas are mutually reinforcing and will create a comprehensive multi-level effort that will make a difference for youth in Metro Vancouver. All project activities will create opportunities for youth to find solutions around these three broad areas. As with all our work, we will be using an anti-oppressive and intersectional framework, which recognizes that individuals face systemic discrimination and barriers based on class, race, gender and other factors that intersect in complex ways.
$10,000.00
2017

Christ Church Cathedral

The Maundy Cafe

This project aims to initiate a cultural shift in faith-based food programs from one that favors arms-length charity to a justice-based approach that combines a focus on food and social inclusion. This project will share learnings gained in the Cathedral’s transformation from emergency food provider to facilitator of food security committed to honoring the agency, creativity, dignity, intellect, and worth of all participants. Since faith communities play a significant role in the city’s food system, this project will have direct effects in progressing towards a more just, inclusive, and participatory food system.
$225,000.00
2017

City of New Westminster

New Westminster Food Summit and Food Security Action Plan & Sustainability Framework - DEVELOP GRANT

A key social issue that the project is trying to address is the lack of equitable access to healthy, nutritious and culturally-appropriate food in New Westminster. A key focus of the food security summit is to identify gaps, needs and opportunities; enhance access and expand availability and choice of food; and, facilitate capacity, collaboration and relationship-building among food providers, as well as to share information about new models and delivery systems. The final product will be a food security action plan and sustainability framework, which will guide the City and its community partners into the future, and assist in implementing the City's Community Poverty Reduction Strategy.
$4,810.00
2017

City of Revelstoke

Pathways out of Poverty

Tackling poverty is critical to the overall health and well-being of individuals and families, as well as our community as a whole. The City of Revelstoke developed a plan to address poverty based on ten community goals. The ‘Pathways to Poverty’ project will support implementation of the plan by leading community engagement, conducting awareness-raising activities, developing related policies, deepening relationships with community partners, and supporting innovative programs delivered by partner organizations. The ultimate goal is to decrease the number of people living in poverty in Revelstoke as well as improve community assets that support poverty prevention and reduction.
$146,700.00
2017

City of Surrey

All Our Relations: Indigenous Children and Families Thriving in Surrey

45% of Indigenous children in Surrey live in poverty. We are compelled to act. Multiple systems interact in complex ways to create Indigenous child poverty. Band-aid solutions will never get at the deep systemic change required. We are proposing a Social Innovation Lab process, bringing all parts of the system together to gain insight into the roots of Indigenous child poverty in Surrey and identify a range of opportunities with the potential for high impact and uptake. We will test solutions, designing, implementing and evaluating together. We envision a ripple effect of change throughout the system, ultimately creating a city where all Indigenous children and families thrive.
$225,000.00
2017

Clayoquot Biosphere Trust Society

Alberni Clayoquot Food Security Action

Food security exists when everyone has physical and economic access to adequate amounts of nutritious and culturally-appropriate food. In the Alberni Clayoquot region, food security is a significant concern, with high rates of poverty and one of the highest rates of child poverty in BC. We have many rural and remote communities, high food prices, transporation barriers and a high cost of living. Our goal is to create a collaborative action plan including our communities, First Nations, organizations, schools, and businesses to find innovative but practical action for policy and social change to meet the food security needs identified in poverty reduction planning with our local leaders.
$6,444.00
2017

Columbia Valley Community Foundation

Columbia Valley Non-profit Capacity Building Program

Local non-profits are often best positioned to respond to communities, however, in rural settings they face a number of challenges. Small populations face common issues and challenges but have few human resources to deliver programs and projects. In order to be effective, they must be more efficient. The Columbia Valley Community Foundation wants to develop a strategy to build the capacity they need. Ongoing support may allow them to react faster and more effectively to needs; communicate, collaborate, and celebrate success together; equip passionate people within organizations with the tools they need to serve their communities, and help to fill gaps when community members move on.
$10,000.00
2017

Community Arts Council of Prince George

Supporting Northern Indigenous Artists

Indigenous artists in the Northern Interior of BC do not have access to professional development, marketing services, exhibition and performance spaces, and funding and arts-related employment opportunities, that are available to their non-Indigenous counterparts. The Community Arts Council of Prince George & District has begun the work to understand how we can forge an authentic and autonomous entity that will accomplish this. To date we have helped to support a group of Indigenous artists form the "Northern Indigenous Artists' Collective" who are continuing to advise us with the end goal of creating an Indigenous Arts Support Office, staffed with a full-time Indigenous Arts Administrator.
$7,860.00
2017

Company Erasga Dance Society

MigARTion: Art and Migrants towards a Critical and Creative Empathy in Collaborative Art Making

This project aspires to contribute to the contemporary Philippine global diasporic artistry, activism and community through an intergenerational, interdisciplinary, intercultural, cross-aestehtics and transcultural engagement. Filipino and Filipino-Canadian artists, migrant group, independent artists and professional arts companies will collaborate to build a new practice and discourse on migration in Canada through art. Issues like family separation, cultural trauma, and settler colonialism are explored through this process. Migrant stories and perspectives are foregrounded through arts-based methodology grounded from a decolonizing creation process.
$10,000.00
2017

CRES

Access to Media Arts - PILOT PROGRAM

This project's main aim is long-term sustainability of a program that offers low-barrier access to equipment, studios, training, education, and workshops. This sustainability is being sought through a "Fee for Service" program, which will use revenue obtained to be put back into the program. We have noticed a gap in services provided for artists, film-makers, media artists, radio producers, and documentary producers to have an affordable place to do audio work, or have audio work done for them by our technicians, with affordable but professional audio equipment. The program will offer a pay scale: one for professionals/regular clients; one for artist-members; and for artist-members who require low barrier access (by application). The cost of rentals and services will reduce for each category. The program will offer services such as: -rental of a professional audio studio -use and rental of professional equipment (following training) -hiring out MAC technicians/artists for work -technical services (dubbing audio, transferring files, audio editing/mixing/mastering) -more to be assessed during pilot phase As VIVO Media Arts Centre members and previous employees, we witnessed the success of their equipment, studio, and service booking system. With this program, we will offer a service we are not able to offer at all right now: access to studios and equipment; and further, with the revenue we receive, we can offer scholarships and lower rates to reduce barriers
$10,000.00
2017

David Suzuki Foundation

Charged Up: Accelerating Community-led Renewable Energy in BC

The conversation around climate change tends to leave individuals and communities feeling overwhelmed, powerless and full of anxiety. It often seems there is little we can do at the local level, and that what governments are doing is just not enough. Small-scale, community owned energy projects can empower communities to be part of positive, meaningful efforts to combat climate change through shared action. The Charged Up campaign will showcase community success stories, convene and train community leaders, and build a clean energy community who can support one another in addressing the technical, financial, and regulatory issues that come with clean energy projects.
$10,000.00
2017

District of Invermere

Columbia Valley Shared Solar Initiative

The Imagine Invermere Implementation Committee is seeking to address energy security for the Columbia Valley by developing a Community Shared Solar Initiative, allowing community members to invest in solar energy production on municipal buildings to reduce their energy bills, reduce their municipal tax bills, and potentially see a future return on their investment. Community shared energy production can buffer rising energy costs and ensure more predictable energy costs for citizens, helping to ensure more secure financial futures in community households.
$5,000.00
2017

Ecotrust Canada

North Coast Innovation Lab

The North Coast Innovation Lab (NCIL) is a place-based initiative which will generate, implement, and scale innovative community designed and driven ideas for a vibrant and inclusive local economy in Prince Rupert. This project will complement the City’s vision for Prince Rupert and test how an intentionally designed innovation lab will bring capacity, resources, creativity, and solutions to bear on the serious problems facing the community. Because this is about systems change at a community level, there is potential for social innovation across a number of fronts. I.e. new partnerships between entrepreneurs, the business community, and academic institutions can change resource flows in terms of capital, human resources, and authority; and collaboration between indigenous and municipal governments can change policy and create active partnerships. The NCIL will build on learnings from the Local Economic Development (LED) Lab, an Ecotrust Canada collaboration with RADIUS SFU, place- based in Vancouver’s inner city, which was supported by the Vancouver Foundation in 2015. The theory, process and design of the NCIL is modeled on LEDLab but will scale beyond a neighbourhood level and test applicability in a municipal and northern context. As a holding place for creative collaborations, co-generating solutions, and adapting and prototyping new approaches, the Lab will play a key role in activating and actioning ideas coming forward through community engagement and visioning.
$225,000.00
2017

Elizabeth Fry Society of Greater Vancouver

In the Best Interests of the Child

EFry seeks to raise the issue of homeless women and children through the lens of BC Legislation, and government responsibilities to see that homeless women and children are not disproportionately disadvantaged by their relative small numbers. The project seeks to rationalize resources to see that the most vulnerable - homeless children - are prioritized; and that homeless and at risk of homelessness women are provided equal opportunity to access supports as their male counterparts to find or remain housed. Doing so will reduce the generational legacy of homelessness in the lives of children as they grow, and provide women fairness, equality and opportunity.
$10,000.00
2017

Faculty of Medicine Digital Emergency Medicine

Evidence Supported Self-management Enablement and Cultural Engagement (ESSENCE)

In BC, doctors use evidence-based clinical guidelines when treating patients with chronic disease. BC is undergoing major health system changes, increasing patient involvement in health care decisions and self-management. For this reason, there is a unique opportunity for multicultural communities to identify recommendations for developing culturally-appropriate evidence-based guidelines, and creating accompanying patient guides. ESSENCE aims to understand barriers and facilitators for multicultural communities to meaningfully participate in health policy discussions, while identifying a pathway for cultural adaptation of clinical practice guidelines for doctors and patients.
$225,000.00
2017

Family Support Institute of B.C.

Personal Information Booklet

When information needs to be shared with team members (gov, health care teams, therapists,...) the end result is often inconsistent & clinical. Parents of children with disabilities find themselves constantly repeating their child’s story. Not only does this add undue stress to the family, it also further perpetuates a non person centered approach to their loved ones' care & they often get described with jargon & labels. This frustration is most apparent during the transition period of a youth’s life when they leave high school and enter adulthood - arguably, the most difficult time in a families' life. A Personal Information Booklet will address these challenges and build cohesive teams.
$10,000.00
2017

Navigating Social and Sexual Relationships

Young adults with disabilities have systemically been excluded in accessing sexuality education tailored to diverse learning needs. Intentional community based sexuality education opportunities for youth with disabilities is necessary to address conflict among educators, service providers and parents about what and how to teach which can leave youth without any sexuality education. Developing healthy sexual expression provides an opportunity to be fully ‘seen’ and communities can address stigma related to recognizing individuals with disabilities as sexual beings. Community based education provides meaningful interaction while supporting responsive, inclusive and welcoming communities.
$10,000.00
2017

Federation of BC Youth In Care Networks

BC Child and Youth in Care Week Celebration Bursaries

The Federation has a process that engages youth in and from care as part of a selection committee for grants and bursaries. This year with the upcoming election and BC Child and Youth in Care Week, we would like to provide additional support to young leaders from care in BC and their adult allies who are looking to host community based celebrations, celebrate a BCCYICW award winner or ensure the increased visibility, celebration and engagement of young leaders in non-partisan pre-election activities. The Federation would recruit youth in and from care to sit on a selection committee, review the applications that come in from across the province and recommend grant recipients. The Federation would then process and mail out the payments required. Youth in and from care will have input in the design of the bursary criteria. Finally their involvement will also be tracked towards honorarium payments according to the Federation's policy.
$10,000.00
2017

Federation of Community Social Services of British Columbia

Community Based Social Services Innovation

Many BC communities face a patchwork of government services that are neither integrated nor holistic. These often fall short of what citizens need and lack community-specific requirements. Provincial governments struggle to bridge silos of regulation, funding, and administration. Our project offers an alternative to such centrally-designed and -managed services based on four successful community pilot programs that took place over the past 2 years. By empowering existing networks of community-based organizations, local governments, and First Nations, we are establishing new ways of organizing, coordinating, and delivering social services to even the smallest and most remote BC communities.
$225,000.00
2017

Fraser Region Aboriginal Friendship Centre Association

Indigenous Youth Affecting Change

Under an Indigenous youth led process, 4 new youth facilitators will begin training on an Indigenous cultural competency based learning tool which they will learn and then deliver and share under a social enterprise business plan. The social enterprise will generate revenues to address the needs of Indigenous youth aging out of care. Through a partnership table including academia, a series of workshops from a cultural competency curriculum will be delivered by youth facilitators to audiences on colonization and steps needed towards reconciliation. The workshops will be presented to municipal & provincial government departments, to public schools, for profit sector and special interests groups. Within the presentations will be an overview of issues affecting Indigenous youth and will present suggestions on how to better serve Indigenous youth through changes to policy, where to place enhanced resourcing for community based services and contribute to awareness on gaps in research. With the involvement of youth and community, a new youth position will be created to guide the social enterprise activities contributing to a legacy of supports for Indigenous youth aging out of care in Surrey. This project will create awareness of urban Indigenous issues, provide Indigenous youth with an advocacy voice and will contribute to a better understanding of the needs and supports needed to reduce the over representation of Indigenous children in care. Our youth are engaged and prepared.
$75,000.00
2017

Frontier College

Community Literacy Catalyst in Pacheedaht First Nation

Frontier College’s CLC program builds local capacity and provides innovative, year-round literacy support that is 1) responsive to local needs, and 2) integrated within existing programs and services. Frontier College hires a local community member (the CLC) to work closely with an existing Frontier College staff member, who provides training and mentorship. Together, staff conduct an initial needs assessment among community stakeholders to determine priorities and opportunities strengthened literacy skills. The CLC then works with community members to design and run a series of pilot activities that respond to local culture, heritage, and community conditions. Gradually, Frontier College shifts from on-site training and mentorship to remote support and advice, as the community takes ownership of programming. Frontier College works in collaboration with host communities – we go where we are needed, and where we are invited. The CLC program represents a new approach to a social and educational system in which Indigenous rights, knowledge, language, and culture are at the centre of community-driven education initiatives. Furthermore, the CLC program significantly enhances a host community’s resource capacity.
$147,800.00
2017

Full Circle: First Nations Performance

Moccasin Trek: Arts on the Move!

For 3 years, we will focus on communities we have not reached plus return to those where we were unable to deliver the services due to lack of resources and high demand. We will offer a wider variety of cultural artistic workshops and take more artists out on tour more frequently. We will increase our marketing and outreach plus invest considerable time consulting with the communities that we visit. The workshops will be educational as well as inspirational. The artists who teach them will serve as role models. For remote communities requiring more extensive travel, we will restructure to program to suit the needs of the community. We believe growing this project will have a clear and lasting outcome for those who participate because it is intended to foster understanding of cultural differences alongside pride in their own heritage plus encourage dialogue with their friends and their families. This will have a direct effect on social issues such as cultural understanding, marginalization and prejudice. MT! will open the door to many, who for a variety of reasons, have never had the opportunity to participate in live performance and witness the incredible power it can have. By sharing our cultural art practices, protocols and traditions with as wide a populace as possible, both the artists and the participants from the community will be inspired, develop insight and deeper understanding. Knowledge is the key to understanding, tolerance and acceptance.
$150,000.00
2017

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