Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Gitga'at First Nation

"We monitor by living here": The Gitga'at Environmental Knowledge Project

In a time of rapid social and environmental change, the Gitga’at First Nation seeks to draw on the local and traditional knowledge of its elders and harvesters to provide a more holistic understanding of the natural word. By documenting observations and knowledge of active harvesters during seasonal harvest rounds, the Gitga’at will create a Knowledge Bank that will be drawn upon to inform holistic resource stewardship and rapid climate change adaptation, while also bolstering intergenerational traditional knowledge transmission and empowering community members to continue their sacred relationship with their territory through active stewardship.
$10,000.00
2017

Glasshouse Capacity Services Society

Interagency Talking Circles

VANDU, the Western Aboriginal Harm Reduction Society (WAHRS) and the British Columbia Association of People on Methadone (BCAPOM) believe that creating more opportunities for our memberships to communicate and collaborate will increase our ability to work together on improving the lives of people who use substances. VANDU, WAHRS and BCAPOM have been working on effecting change locally, provincially and federally for almost twenty years. Since our inception VANDU has advocated that drug use is a health issue not a criminal issue. To reduce harms experienced by people who use substances we need significant structural changes including regulation of currently illegal drugs.
$10,000.00
2017

Global Youth Education Network Society

Fostering Change Community Organizing Jumpstart

Fostering Change Community Organizing Jumpstart will provide new community organizers with the skills, relationships and confidence to run effective campaigns. It involves 3 components: Component 1: Organize BC Core Training in the Lower Mainland for three youth from the Fostering Change network. Participants will learn: - How to tell their story to mobilize others to take action and gain insight into their own leadership potential - How to recruit and retain volunteers - How to devise an effective campaign strategy - How to select tactics that align with their strategic goals Component Two: At a Tactics Training in April, 25-40 participants will work collaboratively to design tactics for the Support the 700 campaign in the lead-up to the May 2017 provincial election. Component Three: From June 25-29, 2017, three youth will attend Campaign Bootcamp (a working title), a 5-day residential program that will bring together grassroots and non-profit movement builders to deepen their learning of effective campaigning and movement-building strategies. With support from skilled and experienced trainers, participants will be guided through creating ready-to-launch campaigns, and will walk away with the confidence to use their voice to campaign on the issues that matter to them. Participants will learn: - How to build campaign from beginning to end that centre marginalized voices - How to campaign in partnership with other movement builders
$9,983.00
2017

Ready to Lead: Organizing and Campaigning Skills for Youth

As Fostering Change sunsets from its leadership role, the baton needs to be passed to new leaders, and youth need to be at the forefront. Ready to Lead offers youth the skills to maintain the momentum created by Fostering Change, and run campaigns that create meaningful change for youth in care. It has four parts: 1)Annual 2-day tailored training. 2)Scholarship Fund to nurture skills of training alumni and train new activists. Provides ~25 spaces in full suite of Organize BC programs (see organizebc.ca). Includes $2,000/yr in trainee travel to Vancouver programs from elsewhere in BC. 3)Coaching for training alumni to support them in implementing new skills into campaigns. 4)The development of the training skills of 1-4 youth as trainers via OBC’s Train the Trainer program. We’ve discussed our proposal with staff at First Call BC, Aunt Leah’s Place, and Society for Children and Youth of BC. Each told us that they thought the training and coaching we propose would be valuable to support youth effectively engaging in advocacy. They all suggested that members of their, or other organizations’, Youth Advisory Councils would be the best candidates for training and support. One person said that many YACs seem to have trouble maintaining focus, and lack needed leadership training, while organizations struggle to find the resources and provide support. Each felt that more support and skills training for YACs would allow them to more effectively organize and advocate for change.
$25,000.00
2017

Grasslands Conservation Council of British Columbia

Private Land Protection - Exploring Options

The "Private Land Protection - Exploring Options" project seeks to explore an expanded role for the Grasslands Conservation Council of British Columbia (GCC) relating to the protection and conservation of priority grasslands across British Columbia. While grasslands represent only 1% of the provincial land base they provide habitat for over 30% of the province's species at risk. GCC would like to enhance its role around protection and conservation of critical habitats for species at risk on private land. We see a possible niche for using conservation covenants on agricultural lands that will enhance both biodiversity conservation and the economic vitality of agricultural producers.
$9,200.00
2017

Grizzly Bear Foundation

Strategies for Human-Grizzly Coexistence and Conflict Reduction in Rural BC (“COEXIST”)

Strategies for Human-Grizzly Coexistence and Conflict Reduction in Rural BC (“COEXIST”) will address the increase in human-grizzly conflict resulting in unsafe situations for both humans and bears. COEXIST will catalyze on-the-ground action by enhancing the knowledge and resources available to local governments, First Nations, the forestry industry, and the public to promote coexistence. COEXIST provides solutions to current wildlife management shortcomings, reducing conflict costs to bears and communities, and in turn creating local economic development opportunities.
$83,000.00
2017

Heiltsuk Tribal Council

Sacred Journeys -The resurgence of Indigenous Canoes -Travelling Exhibit

Social innovation and change intertwine in the main goals of Sacred Journeys. Sacred Journeys an engaging travelling exhibit about Indigenous canoe culture. At a fundamental level, it is about cultural revival,cultural health and cross cultural understanding. By touring15-20 major BC museums and Indigenous cultural centres over 4-5 years, it will engage and educate 10,000s of visitors from children to leaders. Appropriately, the exhibit will become a permanent display in Bella Bella, where it will continue to inspire both visitors and community members alike. Through its many teachings, metaphors, and values, the ocean going canoe was and is central to the daily life, culture, and spirituality of First Peoples of the Pacific Coast. Almost lost through the effects of colonization and technology, the Heiltsuk were instrumental in reviving this canoe culture and for the first time will share their story. Against the norm of museums, this story will be produced an told from Indigenous peoples prospective. By walking through a stylized ocean going canoe one will be able to touch a screen embedded in the symbolic supernatural paddles ; each screen will share the Indigenous people’s history, culture and stories, leading to the present, with an option to comment and ask questions. It will inspire visitors to engage in the revival of the Indigenous culture, thus leading to better health and wellness in our local communities and educating the general public.
$223,000.00
2017

Hollyburn Family Services Society

Senior Roommate Registry

Seniors living in poverty and senior homelessness are social issues across every urban community. By investigating the creation of a program that brings seniors living in their own home together with seniors in need of safe and affordable housing options may positively address a myriad of issues vulnerable seniors face such as; low incomes, affordable housing options, increased independence, socialization and safety in a timely and cost effective manner.
$10,000.00
2017

Hope for the Nations

Food for Thought

Many children live in a food insecure home and are at risk of going to school hungry. We know that a hungry child is more likely to act out and less likely to achieve their personal and academic potential. We currently provide breakfast to 1500 students a day in 30 schools in the central okanagan. We want to use the local agriculture system more in our programming to offer more nutritious food to students, to help build a just, sustainable food system for all, and to build capacity in students and schools. Having access to healthy food will help children learn better. Children will be better educated, have more opportunities to succeed, and become agents of change.
$9,740.00
2017

Judith Marcuse Projects Society

JMP: Futures Forward

Community-engaged arts for social change (ASC) are increasingly acknowledged around the world as potent and effective ways for communities to engage with diverse, often complex and challenging issues. The field of ASC has developed unique goals, methods, pedagogy and scholarship; Canada (and, particularly, Vancouver) are acknowledged leaders in this burgeoning arts practice.This project aims to advance the field by providing new resources, job opportunities, networking, research, and knowledge exchange opportunities for artists, community members, scholars and diverse changemakers working in agendas for positive social change through the arts.
$10,000.00
2017

Justice For Girls

Justice For Girls' Advocacy and Education Centre

JFG aims to influence systemic change in the education system by developing a Girls' Advocacy and Education Centre. This 3-year project will lay the foundation to pilot such a centre which will address the critical need for an innovative and integrated model of support, education and advocacy necessary for young women to truly transition out of poverty, homelessness, instability and violence. There are four ways that this project will influence systemic change: 1. Outreach and advocacy for girls marginalized from the school system • Targeted educational support and advocacy to facilitate school connection/reconnection and completion, freedom from violence, and adequate housing 2. Girls' Education & Empowerment • Girls rights education workshops in schools 3. Young Women’s Leadership program • 5-month full-time program providing an income, training and grade 12 or college-level course credits to young women as a pathway to graduation and leadership • young women will contribute experiential knowledge and peer support within JFG, and build the capacity of the education system by bringing their perspectives to education policies, programs and professional training 4. Public Education and Training • Professional development training for teachers, teachers in training, school counsellors and other education professionals • Public awareness campaigns • Engagement of partners, community stakeholders and champions to influence systemic change
$225,000.00
2017

Kamloops and District Elizabeth Fry Society

Mobilize Change for Youth Experiencing Homelessness

A Way Home is a committee led by youth with lived experience implementing Kamloops Youth Homelessness Action Plan. We have identified a two component project. The first is a launch event to release results from our Youth Homelessness Count – the first in Canada. Findings showed 56 youth currently homeless and 73 who experienced episodic homelessness. The event’s purpose is to educate public through the voices of youth providing recommendations for social change. The event would inspire a community movement pre-election. Youth will be involved in the planning and leadership. The launch event will engage everyone around youth homelessness and how to prevent it for youth aging out. The second component would be to hire a contractor to create a business plan on the Youth Count key recommendation: Safe Suite housing program. There is a significant need for Youth Housing First for youth ages 18-24 that are aging out of foster care and/or experiencing homelessness. In 2015, we completed a pilot of this model with 4 youth and limited staffing where we recognized the need for 24/7 staffing. Safe Suites would serve youth who need a supportive environment to stabilize and transcend homelessness. A contractor would complete a Safe Suites business plan from youth and community feedback and research.The plan would be used to engage provincial ministries and the private sector for funding sustainability. A Way Home would mobilize this plan in community to bring this project to life.
$5,500.00
2017

MY Place/Lived Experience Drop In Centre Life Skills development Program for Social Change

The innovation lies within the hearts and minds that know the crisis first hand - those with lived experiences. The challenge in implementing the innovation is twofold: 1) how do we move people in crisis that are tired and feel disenfranchised and move them to an environment of planning and implementing strategic and direct sociopolitical action and; 2) how do we, as a team of people with lived experience and those with socioeconomic privilege, come together and cause these different new relationships to form between these key stakeholder elements that sustain a campaign that makes systemic change on a municipal level possible and beneficial for all.Our project actions have to be innovative as to where, why and how those with lived experiences gather together for reasons other than daily survival (soup kitchens and \social service appointments), we come together as well for strategic reasons that bring us face to face with other entities that either don't understand the issues or have limited information that has been shared in a more sanitized version and approach. We must bring the truth of what we know and how we know this directly to the halls of power through presentations, workshops, panels and testimonies that dispel myths & stereotypes and foster awareness of the need for the collective responsibility and not individualize the reasons for the crisis.Finally,we must navigate and infiltrate the influential interconnected social systems and create a new flow of change.
$10,000.00
2017

Kinsight Community Society

Kudoz: From Prototype to Scale

One's possibilities are limited to one's experiences, and for persons with intellectual disabilities (PWD), there is often a significant a poverty of experiences. Too many are repeating the same daily routines, and recycling the same conversations with the same people. They are not flourishing in our professional systems nor in our communities. Kudoz is an experience catalogue that bridges PWD with community members around shared passions--from song-writing to animation. The platform is based on evidence-based theory and design-thinking, and is built to address the determinants that lead to outcomes around quality of life, social connection, employment, and the reduction of social stigma.
$50,000.00
2017

Kiwassa Neighbourhood Services Association

Neighbourhood Love Letters

Neighbourhood Love Letters (LL): an arts-based community engagement process connecting youth-in-and-from care (YIC) with residents in Hastings-Sunrise & Grandview-Woodlands to harvest the deep, unspoken seeds of belonging that make up a neighbourhood , and reflect the spirit of neighbourhood back to itself, in it’s own words, illustrated in shared public spaces. Supported by Corrina Keeling, Lead Artist, Diego Cardona, Youth Coordinator and Vicki Li, Volunteer Coordinator, a spring and summer engagement process for resident volunteers, inclusive of a group of youth-in-care, gain skills in art installation and community-directed inquiry, and interact at multiple points along the way, including meeting in person, contributing to the LL Scrapbooks, and witnessing the fruits of their own dialogue through temporary sidewalks and street installations in the neighbourhood. Fall harvest of scrapbook writings and photo documentation of sidewalk/street installation will form the basis of an arts exhibit and dialogue between youth and adults. LL will work w youth through networks including VACFSS-CRUW, Urban Butterflies, Youth Matters, Templeton CST, RISE, Roving Leaders. Importance of connections & social capital for all people is well-documented. Weaving YIC connection to and aspirations for place and home with those of other residents will provide a tangible, beautiful record of community affection and dialogue, & insight into strengthening connections in place.
$9,900.00
2017

Kwantlen Polytechnic University Foundation

Including All Citizens Project: Inclusive Post Secondary Education for Students with Disabilities

As with all employment rates, education is key to getting and keeping a job. The low rates of employment for people with ID is reflected in the low rates of post-secondary training and education. More than half of people with intellectual disabilities reported experiencing barriers to training. Almost 42% of people with ID received work-related training; however, 25 % reported that the training they received was insufficient and discouraged them from looking for work. On-the-job training was most common among people with ID compared to classroom-based training. Post-secondary education for all students can be a critical factor in finding and keeping employment as well as offering the ability to create social connections and community engagement. IACP will influence systemic change in the following ways: (1) provide a successful pilot as a model of inclusive programming; (2) create a teacher’s guide to assist other instructors in transforming their teaching to reach a wide range of learners; (3) identify policy barriers located within the educational system; and, (4) provide leadership and encourage innovative pedagogical practices. The pedagogical foundation of this project has far reaching potential including, but not limited to, programs that offer English as Alternative Language (ESL) services. IACP also has the potential to influence pedagogical reform in secondary education.
$117,875.00
2017

Lake Windermere Ambassadors Society

Citizen Science Series - Year 2 & 3

The era of climate imposed decisions regarding source water protection and water allocation for humans and the ecosystems upon which we depend, has arrived.  The Water Sustainability Act, a modernized Columbia River Treaty and localized watershed governance, will rely on accurate data, since water policy and data are inextricably intertwined. Community based monitoring includes open source, transparent, accessible, scientifically robust and indigenous relevant water data to inform decisions.  21st century challenges will require forging innovative, collaborative partnerships to collectively ensure economically and ecologically viable, climate resilient communities in Canada. 
$100,000.00
2017

Learning Disabilities Association of British Columbia - Vancouver Chapter

The Better Futures Project

Those with learning disabilities (LD’s) often have an above average intelligence, however because of the way their brain processes information they struggle to learn in the same way as others. As a result, the employment rate of adults with an LD is less than half the employment rate of those without. Additionally, often employers haven’t been educated in how to support someone with an LD and so this acts as a further barrier to employment. LDAV have therefore worked with partners to create a new project outline that addresses both sides of this issue. LDAV will be working to develop the content of the program further and test out the model to help more people with LD’s gain employment.
$10,000.00
2017

Lookout Society

Downtown Residential Art Collective

Lookout proposes to create a peer-led art collective, supported by Lookout’s Life Skills workers and Tenant Support Workers. Through this art collective tenants and staff will work together to facilitate art groups, programs and workshops aiming to develop and empower artists living in the DTES through creative expression and education with the goal of hosting an Art Exhibit. This project will collaborate with a local non-profit art gallery. Group facilitation will educate residents in the DTES and surrounding communities about inclusion and reduce the stereotypes related to poverty. We will collaborate with various cultural groups to encourage artists to embrace their culture.
$10,000.00
2017

Lu'ma Native Housing Society

Aboriginal Youth Mentorship & Housing Program

Current core program goals are to aid, assist and support 15-20 Aboriginal Youth that have or will be “Aging out of Care” to develop life-skills and other key areas to assist in their transition to Adulthood. Main stream funding sources that the Aboriginal Youth Mentorship and Housing Program are partnered with require results such as employment, education and/or housed. The youth in the AYM&HP successfully acquired these goals however maintaining these achievements has proven to be challenging at best. Through the evolution and development of the program it has become evident that the youth need more than connections to resources and removal of physical barriers. It has been our experience that our Indigenous Youth also need access to healing through a variety of practices to match each youth’s individual needs such as traditional, cultural, alternative and innovative methods to assist with trauma, addictions, mental health and other emotional barriers the youth are experiencing. Youth that have Aged Out of Care endure long wait lists that do not allow for actual in the moment planning, resistance to alternative methods of healing and wellness as well as little or no support to become engaged in cultural activities or are lacking financial resources to travel to and participate in the cultural experiences that could be available to them. This application will provide youth opportunities to strengthen or develop cultural connections to community.
$10,000.00
2017

Traditional Healers/Elders Project at Lu'ma Medical Centre

The disparity in health for Indigenous people is no longer acceptable. In order to improve health outcomes we must reconcile how health care is delivered to Indigenous peoples. who have experienced a much higher amount of consistent trauma over long periods of time from systemic discrimination and removal of children. Traditional Healers/Elders can engage Indigenous patients to actively participate in healing their body, spirit, mind and emotions to restore their health. Culturally integrated health care is innovative because the teachings and practices of ancient traditional healing is applied to empower individuals & families to solve health challenges today.
$74,983.00
2017

Lytton First Nation

?'q'?mcín [Two Rivers] Remix

BC First Nations youth on reserve and many BC contemporary Indigenous musical artists face extreme economic, cultural and social exclusion. ?'q'?mcín [Two Rivers] Remix is a free outdoor feast of contemporary Indigenous music on Nlha'7kapmx territory that features BC Aboriginal musicians creating a critical new grassroots sound that empowers Indigenous youth and women. Regenerating the Lytton Block Party through a series of exploratory, creative and collaborative workshops with Indigenous youth, artists, educators and elders - the festival will engage new audiences for this rowdy musical remix of urban/rez, visual/aural, hip-hop/pow-wow, and personal/political.
$10,000.00
2017

Massey Theatre Society

Indigenous Arts Series (Skookum Arts Series)

The Skookum Indigenous Arts Series will celebrate some of the most dynamic Aboriginal Theatre artists, musicians, dance artists, visual and media artists from across the country. This arts celebration will help to raise awareness of First Nations talent, artistic practices, and foster cultural exchange and dialogue. With this, Massey Theatre Society is creating a new program to create a focus in its physical and cultural renewal. This celebration project will priorities inclusion of indigenous artists at the forefront as the theatre enters its 70th anniversary year and beyond. Innovation is furthered by the accompanying goals of identifying a presenting network for the series moving it beyond its host community and developing Savage Society's capacity to promote the program on an ever widening network creating opportunities to showcase Savage Society's productions along with other Aboriginal Performance works. Savage Society, an aboriginal theatre company and partner in this project has a curatorial goal is to create an arts series that brings participants into a shared experience of indigenous arts and culture in a way that is inviting, inspiring and illuminating. Performances will include dance, theatre, and music. We will also showcase Indigenous films, animation, literary and media artists and visual artists. We intend to promote socio-political dialogue as well in partnership with community organizers and institutions.
$225,000.00
2017

Matsqui-Abbotsford Impact Society

Who We Are, What We Are, Why We Are (WWA3)

WWA3 develops from the words of Sq’éwlets elder Reg Phillips: "The past can either imprison us, or set us free. That is our choice. And so, link that with the tremendous culture and customs and traditions that we have as Xwelmexw people. All of the sacred things that the native people do or live through—like culture is a way of living. And I think just beginning to understand who we are and what we are and why we are. And I believe that last one… why we are, what are we really here on this earth, at this time, for—I really believe it has to do with a lot of healing." (digitalsqewlets.ca) This project allows us to support a staff person to continue to span the Fraser-Salish region—collecting the aspirations communities have for their youth (especially youth in care), and helping them come together to realize these aspirations. This position (2014-2016 VYPER, 2016-2018 YEP) has been widely embraced and utilized to support the sharing of power with young people so they can have a consistent and growing role in community-developed projects and develop their own projects—their own ways of defining who, what and why they are—constructing their own healing, identity & freedom—to steward the land, themselves, and the future 7 generations. The project has been developing along 5 streams: 1) Youth co-facilitated interactive workshops, 2) Youth-led, adult-supported regional conferences, 3) Local youth and elder events, 4) Youth advisory/action groups, 5) Knowledge exchange activities.
$50,000.00
2017

McCreary Centre Society

Resilience revolution: Roles and realities of stress in youth’s lives

McCreary’s Youth Research Academy (YRA) are a group of youth in and from care who are learning research skills and conducting research projects of interest to youth in care and the agencies that serve them. In March 2017 the YRA are facilitating a Research Slam to offer other youth with care experience the opportunity to learn some research skills and engage in a short research project about how young people experience and manage stress. This project will build on the results of the Research Slam. Members of the YRA, and Slam participants who wish to remain involved, will develop and deliver a knowledge translation workshop. The workshop will share the findings of the research into how young people experience and manage stress, and will also gather feedback on the results and ideas to increase resilience among youth. A minimum of four workshops will be delivered to diverse youth, including a minimum of two workshops with youth in and from care. Participants will then be supported to synthesize the feedback and to develop key messages to share with stakeholder groups (e.g., foster parents, teachers, youth). In addition to the knowledge translation workshops, project participants will also undertake a review of available tools and resources to help youth develop the skills they need to effectively manage stress.
$10,000.00
2017

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