Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

McCreary Centre Society

Youth Research Academy: Post majority research pilot

A shortage of longitudinal data exists about the challenges, supports and successes youth aging out of care experience. McCreary aims to use the expertise gathered by conducting surveys such as the BC AHS and Homeless and Street Involved Youth Survey (HSIYS), and longitudinal studies (e.g., 3-year evaluation following youth leaving PLEA) to support the YRA to develop and deliver a pilot study tracking youth as they age out of care. The YRA have been trained in survey development, data entry, analysis and dissemination. They have also been involved in focus groups and consultations with youth in and from government care. They will apply their developing research skills to this project. The project will follow established research ethics protocols for data collection and storage consistent with those used in other McCreary projects. Established protocols are also in place to ensure the secure handling of identifying information. Following youth and adult stakeholder consultations and with support from McCreary, TRRUST Collective Impact partners, and the YRA advisory committee, YRA members will develop a pilot study about the experiences of BC youth who age out of care. This post majority survey will canvass responses from youth approaching their 19th birthday and at two future time points (6 and 12 months). The YRA will be involved in all aspects of the project, from survey design to data analysis and dissemination.
$100,000.00
2017

Meal Exchange

Real Food Challenge BC: launch phase

The Real Food Challenge’s goal is to transform the environmental impacts of the millions that BC colleges and universities spend annually on food. Current policy treats this procurement as a simple ancillary service: necessary like the bookstore, but not connected to campus mission or community wellbeing. The result: campus purchasing is supporting our global agricultural industry, which is a top contributor to climate change, freshwater use and pollution, and destruction of wildlife habitat. By auditing campus supply chains and demonstrating public support for shifting purchasing policies, we will leverage the power of public procurement for investing in our province’s ecosystems.
$198,484.00
2017

MISCELLANEOUS Productions

The Next Generation

The Next Generation is an innovative professional training program for MP alumnae and young artists/ professionals struggling with various mental, physical and developmental disabilities as well other issues of marginalization; as well as a socially innovative public education campaign directed at artistic leaders, and arts-based funders. The vision is to develop un- and under-employed young arts professional within a unique career skill development environment, working alongside professional artists and arts administrators; and pushing forward a message about their vision of the future. Through an artistic educational campaign (a series of short films for social media developed by the youth interns and staff and distributed internationally) which will begin with an analysis of intersectionality and tokenism in the hiring practices in the next generation of artistic leaders, conduct outreach to arts organizations and relevant funders and promote a message of inclusion of diverse artists in their hiring practices and educate powerful leaders about community-engaged artistic practice. Our history working with marginalized youth makes us uniquely positioned to meet their needs by providing them with tailored opportunities to gain the necessary professional artistic and business skills to promote these innovative ideas in the arts sector, to advocate for pro-active systemic change in the arts and create possible models to address the imbalance of artistic leadership in BC.
$195,000.00
2017

Mount Currie Band

Ucwalmícwts Voices Immersion Project

There are 2 parts to Ucwalmícwts Voices Immersion Project. Part 1 addresses our most vulnerable populations: infants, children and at-risk teens. They are supported by their parents, teachers and Elders. We would like to activate the following programs: 1. Daycare Learning Nest program with Elders, teachers and parents. 2. Elementary school immersion program (K-Grade 12) with Elders, teachers and mentees/interns 3. Storytelling program for at-risk teens 4. Mentor-Apprentice program for at-risk teens Part 2 addresses the community at large, including, to some extent, all Canadians and visitors. This ensures cross-sector outreach, envelopment and reinforcement of Ucwalmícwts. 1. Chiefs, Council and Band administration take Ucwalmícwts courses. 2. Employers receive incentives to send employees for paid Ucwalmícwts courses. 3. Ucwalmícwts is used during recreation & leisure programs, community gatherings, games nights, and more. 4. Mount Currie Band renews all way-finding and building signage to be bilingual (Ucwalmícwts/phoenetic English). This exposes community members, visitors and all Canadians to the language.
$25,000.00
2017

Nanaimo Foodshare Network Society

A Round the Table- Creating Change for a Local Food System for Everyone

This project addresses creating a local, sustainable food system inclusive of all incomes and abilities in the community. The reasons an individual might be food insecure are local and global. Whatever the reasons, the outcome is the same: people are going through the day without having enough nutritious food to eat, and unable to access land, skills, and resources needed to grow food locally. On the front lines, Nanaimo has a number of programs who address food insecurity day-to-day, but they don’t address the underlying causes. The focus of this program is to step away from the front lines, to bring our community together to discuss and address the underlying causes of food insecurity.
$9,675.00
2017

Network of Inner City Community Services Society

The Restoring Right Relationship Circle Training Project

Systemic racial discrimination against Indigenous peoples, resulting in extensive violence, harm, marginalization and inequity that causes institutionalized ill-health, trauma, poverty and violence for Indigenous peoples, will be countered with the growth of community-based Indigenous Restoraing Right Relationship skills and tools infrastructure amongst over 18 Indigenous-focused urban aboriginal agencies in the Vancouver Inner City. The pilot connects personal and interpersonal Indigenous restorative skills and behaviours with agency, policy and structural supports to develop a critical mass of healing, positive, restorative Indigenous and Indigenous-Ally relationships and community.
$225,000.00
2017

New West Hospice Society

New West Hospice: Helping to Build a Compassionate City through Good Neighbour Partnerships

Healthcare today can’t meet all the practical, social and emotional needs for people and families at end-of-life. These unattended needs often lead to isolation, loneliness and social inequality. New West Hospice Society is adopting the Compassionate City Charter to address 13 social changes to normalize dying, death and loss. Our Good Neighbour Partnership will link a person/family living with palliative care needs at home and those in their circle of community who are able to offer social and practical support. The issues around dying, death and grief have been shrouded in a “mind your own business” attitude. We believe that care for one another at this time is everybody’s business.
$100,500.00
2017

North Shore Disability Resource Centre Association (NSDRC)

InclusionWorks North Shore

This innovative program assists and prepares young adults with developmental disabilities to transition from an inclusive high school experience to a more independent adult community based life, family governed and community supported. Not agency run, it unfolds the way life does, with skill enhancing activities in community settings (libraries, community centres, businesses, work sites, recreation facilities). Young adults participate in a “campus” type of experience that is flexible and serves a wide range of skill development, both part time or full time or on a “one course at a time” basis. Highly skilled coaches and educators provide support and instruction. CLBC currently funds some programs through North Shore agencies, however they are somewhat limited in nature, often operating in more self-contained settings outside the general community. Even those limited programs regularly face budget cuts and it is time to find a new, sustainable way to provide the education, social, recreational and employment skills programs that foster the growth young adults achieved during their high school years. Because these groups can be small and flexible, programming needs can change as needs of participants change, and they can be life-long learners and contributors to their communities through employment and/or volunteer work where they will be known by all its citizens, not just those with disabilities. This innovative and inclusive model is sustainable, economical and replicable.
$75,000.00
2017

Ocean Wise Conservation Association

Ocean Plastics Initiative

The Ocean Plastics Initiative (OPI) will challenge the perception that it is ok to produce, use and dispose of large quantities of plastics that end up in our oceans. Leveraging Ocean Wise’s experience and expertise in ocean plastic research and solutions, OPI will build a network of organizations and businesses committed to reducing their plastic use. The network will provide space for innovation, identifying and addressing common challenges to reducing plastic use, and creating solutions to apply across businesses and sectors. Ultimately, OPI will help normalize plastic-free business practices, hastening the shift to less plastic entering and persisting in the ocean.
$10,000.00
2017

Options Community Services

Nothing About Us Without Us All Candidates Meeting

The 2017 Nothing about Us without Us All Candidates Meeting is a project led by youth in and from foster care. The objective of the meeting is have our local candidates present their thoughts and plans that they have for youth as we lead up to the provincial election in May 2017. This idea came out of discussions that was facilitated by the Vancouver Foundations Manager of Communications, Jon Garner at the Fostering Change Grantees forum on Feb. 20, 2017. The plan is to have a partnership of youth serving agencies in Surrey develop a steering committee that will oversee the planning of the project. That Steering table will include youth, young people in and from care, youth serving agencies, and other community members. The steering committee will support young people in activities such as, reaching out to candidates, prepping for the event (i.e., developing questions, organizing the evening agenda, seeking community partnership, etc…), and securing the venue and snacks (i.e., coffee, water, pastries, etc…). Youth will also be supported in organizing focus groups in the community of Surrey to gather information on youth issues that will inform the questions that will be presented to the candidates. Training will be provided to assist youth participants of the event and there will be 3 months of follow-up of the project.
$4,000.00
2017

Our Community Bikes (OCB)

PEDAL Bicycle Industry Training (PBIT) Program

The PBT Program is a unique pre-employment and life skills training program for youth and people with barriers to employment. Through low-cost tuition and subsidized programs, PBMT Program will empower people to become bike mechanics and a part of the broader cycling community. Delivered in a community-bike shop setting through an anti-oppression education model the students will receive both technical and life skills training to be job ready for employment or participation in the bicycle repair industry. The PBIT Program is a unique pre-employment and life skills training program for youth and people with barriers to employment. Through low-cost tuition, PBIT Program will empower trainees to become employed in the bicycle industry and a part of the broader cycling community. Delivered in a community-bike shop setting through an anti-oppression education model, the students will receive both technical and life skills training, to be job ready for employment or participation in the bicycle industry. Technical training will focus on basic and advanced bicycle repair knowledge and will give students a basic understanding of a bicycle retail operation. Life skills training will encourage students to use effective communication and to present themselves as confident and forthright individuals. Students will gain skills in pre-employment preparations, leadership, peer support, and foundations in social justice. PEDAL will work with the bicycle industry to provide i
$10,000.00
2017

Pacific AIDS Network

Collective Collaboration : An Initiative to Build Capacity & Engagement to Impact BC’s HCV Landscape

People living with hepatitis C (HCV) in British Columbia want to contribute to the development of public health strategies. However, community-based organizations lack resources to ensure their involvement in leadership & decision-making. Establishing a Peer Leadership Development program to build capacity of People with Lived Experience of HCV will enable equitable participation. The foundation is the principle ‘Nothing About Us, Without Us’; it aims to articulate the rights of people living with HCV, impact policy changes & maximize the potential for reducing new infections.
$225,000.00
2017

Parent Support Services Society of B.C.

Supporting Children and Youth in Kinship Care to Thrive!

Growing numbers of children & youth are raised by relatives – often grandparents. Reasons: drug use of parents (opioid epidemic), neglect/abandonment, violence/abuse, mental/physical health/death of parents. Like foster children,the children in kinship care families have experienced trauma that causes health issues.Being raised by kin is known as best practice. Yet aging kinship caregivers do not receive the same support/services as foster parents. Kinship caregivers raise children who would otherwise be in Ministry care. They frequently spiral into poverty. Our project will take steps to ensure these caregivers receive the equitable long-term support necessary for their children to thrive.
$10,000.00
2017

PeerNet BC

Fostering Access and Inclusion

Fostering Access and Inclusion project will provide youth in and out of care, front line youth in and out of care workers and agencies of care opportunities to participate in anti-oppression, leadership, peer support and facilitation training workshops. PeerNetBC has seen a need for this project with our experience working with multiple youth in care serving agencies to build training opportunities for youth in and out of care to facilitate community events such as "A Hand Up Not A Hand Out" and Federation of BC Youth In Care Networks leadership camps. These workshops help build awareness and give youth and adult allies skills and tools to navigate their own journey to advocate for their needs in and out of care systems and transition to a more connected community and network. PeerNetBC will provide scholarships for youth to attend our regular Spring and Fall workshop series as well as customized workshops for youth in care serving agencies. This will also include a special summer series geared specifically for youth. This series provides opportunities for youth from a diverse range of knowledge and experiences to come together to build and share their own skills and those of their peers. Our goal is to build and bridge connections among youth towards being able to implement systemic change in addressing their needs. For information about our current Spring Workshops here's the link: http://www.peernetbc.com/upcoming-workshops-2
$10,000.00
2017

Pembina Foundation for Environmental Research and Education

Social Housing Revitalization Pilot

The Pembina Institute is working with BC Housing, the BC Non-Profit Housing Association, construction and manufacturing companies, and non-profit partners to adapt and pilot the Energiesprong retrofit approach in B.C. The project will evaluate the potential to aggregate social housing and work towards creating the first competitive request for proposals for energy efficiency retrofits of multi tenant buildings in BC. This approach rethinks the conventional resource flows of green building initiatives by focusing benefits on low-income and marginalized communities while incentivizing industry to invest in research and development to deliver low-cost technologies and new delivery models.
$10,000.00
2017

PHS Community Services Society

PHS Youth Research Iniative

Through the PHS Youth Housing First Project we became aware of the fact that the majority of youth in the DTES were exited prematurely from the foster care system and that the correlation between their drug use, homelessness, transition to IV drug use and the connection to a premature exit from care needed to be explored more extensively. For this new project we would like to assign a researcher and a youth research assistant to gather pertinent info using primary sites such as Insite, New Fountain Shelter, PHS housing sites for youth and our Overdose Prevention Sites to gather data, and disseminate the findings. The tools we would use are, surveys, qualitative interviews, internal age based confidential statistics from Insite, and other referral sites. The specific information we will be trying to extract is: which young people (who we come into contact with at these sites between 16-30) had involvement with the child welfare system, at which age they entered that system, what was the age and point of exit from the child welfare system, when the youth started using drugs, the correlation between drug use and insecure housing, and what the housing trajectory has been since.
$90,000.00
2017

Potluck Cafe Society

Knack

Our aim is to create a diversity of income-generating opportunities that fit the diverse needs of residents of the DTES. We want to build an innovative framework that recognizes employment-related skills and qualities that residents of the DTES have gained through unconventional paths that don’t usually get highlighted on a typical resume. We hope to assist individuals who want to move along the employment continuum and meet them where they’re at. For the next phase, we want to test our badging framework with external agencies and build capacity within the system to facilitate greater mobility for individuals who are advancing along the income generation continuum. Through our initial testing, we saw that recognizing individuals with badges for their earned achievements often empowers them with greater self-efficacy and inspires them to aim higher. We’ve also seen that smaller, task-based work opportunities get them more acquainted with employer-employee relationships and increases their confidence in their own ability to re-enter the workforce. At the core of this social innovation is a desire to realign resource flow around knowledge (training) and money (income). We see a ripple effect for basic routines, policies and beliefs that are preventing the widespread adoption of Social Hiring. Our goal is to recognize and champion the strengths and abilities of our program participants, and support the creation of a more inclusive, accessible and resilient local economy.
$150,000.00
2017

Powell Street Festival Society

Advocacy and Outreach Through Arts-based Community Development at WePress

This project will build on the ongoing work of PSFS to have a year-round presence in the DTES, to link the history of Japanese Canadian (JC) expulsion from the DTES during WWII with challenges of displacement faced by current residents, and to be a committed partner with residents and groups working in the neighbourhood. This partnership combines PSFS’ historical perspective and activity with the goals and operational infrastructure of WePress Community Arts Space, which houses a variety of art-making platforms, and welcomes people marginalized by class, sexuality, gender, race, culture, disability, mental health, and addictions. The social innovation lies in the ability to run paid workshops and sell merchandise to those who can afford them in order to generate revenue that allows PSFS and WePress to provide job and economic opportunities for low-income and marginalized people, teach new skills through free and low-cost workshops, provide a welcoming space and access to unique equipment for art-making and community-building, support DTES social justice groups, and promote JC art, culture, and history and the work of PSFS. In this way, PSFS and WePress can bring together people from diverse income levels to interact, make art together, and learn a little about each others’ lives. Furthermore, PSFS will continue to contribute to the development of a new independent social justice arts organization in the DTES and its long-term survival.
$75,000.00
2017

Puente Theatre Society

Development workshop for a show about Mexican Immigration

There’s a great deal of political rhetoric right now in the US that casts Mexican immigrants as job-thieves and criminals – but they’re actually refugees from a country ruined by violence and corruption. Puente Theatre would like to give voice to actual Mexicans, so that a more complex picture might emerge of the issues that face our continent: gathering a team of Mexican artists from across the country, Puente will host an initial creative workshop, with the aim of creating a full stage production the following season: a show about the roots of the Mexican diaspora, a tremendously personal testament by a group of veteran artists, bound by common heritage, far from the land of their birth.
$10,000.00
2017

Queer Arts Festival

UnSettling: A Vision from the Margins

This 3­-year commitment redirects established flows of money & power with strategic hires at key levels—intentional & visible placements of Queer People Of Colour (QPOC) in positions of cultural authority & focused initiatives to nurture promising emerging QPOC cultural workers into future arts leaders. QAF engages Adrian Stimson (Siksika), T’uy’tanat-­Cease Wyss (Skwxwu7mesh/Sto:Lo) & Valérie d. Walker to curate our 2017­-19 visual art exhibitions respectively, with engagements in public discourse, outreach & collaborations with diverse partners. Guest lectures at grunt, ECUAD, UBC, & SFU increase QPOC visibility in public & academic contemporary visual art discourse. Exhibition tours for queer, Indigenous & street-­involved youth, artist panels & public fora provide entry points to the often exclusive visual art milieu through direct contact with QPOC role models. The project also engages emerging QPOC arts administrator Kimberly Sayson in full­-time, multi­-year paid mentorship & an emerging exhibition preparator, cultivating well-­rounded competencies & leadership skills. By interrupting the cyclical narrative of exclusion, we increase individual experience, income & influence for QPOC curators, artists & administrators that they can leverage toward future opportunities; improve organizational resilience by expanding perspectives & networks; & shift cultural beliefs to re­vision QPOC identity as a site for expertise & creative self­-authorship rather than a mark of disenfranchisement.
$225,000.00
2017

Raincoast Conservation Foundation

Restoring Governance for Salmon Conservation in the Lower Fraser River and Estuary

This project addresses the failure of governments and agencies to protect salmon habitat in the Lower Fraser River and Estuary. This failure has come at the detriment of globally significant salmon runs and the First Nations, local communities, economies and other wildlife that rely on these fish. A huge opportunity now exists to test governance and funding models for delivering a First Nations and community-lead initiative that envisions salmon resilience in the Lower Fraser. Using salmon as the indicator for freshwater sustainability, an initiative focused on habitat conservation will guide planning, restoration and management, facilitating recovery of a degraded river and its salmon.
$70,000.00
2017

Ready to Rent BC Association

Walk With Support Expansion

Over the past two years Ready to Rent (R2R) has been engaging with youth to understand their housing support needs. Through surveying over 500 youth, Ready to Rent has learned that 71% of youth have had housing related questions and didn't know who to ask in regards to these questions. Ready to Rent embarked to understand if a housing support model that incorporated texting in addition to in-person, email and call support could be an impactful and accessible form of housing support for youth. From in person consultations with 40 young people, 80% told Ready to Rent that they would utilize a text support line to solve housing related issues. We explored various options for providing IM and texting service and have identified iCarol as the most appropriate and cost effective platform, the platform being used be Need2, youth suicide prevention line. iCarol integrates texting/IM with data tracking and resource sections. R2R will have increased capacity to support thousands of youth in their housing journey. Furthermore, the iCarol platform will allow R2R to learn about the unique housing issues of youth and respond to these issues through adjusting course curriculum and supports. For example, if data indicates that eviction rates due to poor pest management are particularly high in Nanaimo, Ready to Rent can use this to inform course content to meet regional needs. Ready to Rent will share these research learnings with the community for collective impact.
$9,850.00
2017

Shift From Crisis to Prevention

Homelessness is a stuck issue that requires new approaches in order to solve it. Part of the solution is shifting away from existing in crisis towards prevention: 'Shift from Crisis to Prevention' will develop a prevention toolkit of effective practices that can be adapted to and compliment community-based efforts to address housing instability and homelessness. This collection of BC-specific actionable and scalable resources will be accompanied by a funding formula and will tap into already existing networks to change beliefs and provide upstream solutions. ‘Shift" is a collaborative approach to provide organizations and communities resources to prevent homelessness from occurring.
$170,545.00
2017

Landlord Guarantee Fund Research

Ready to Rent BC (R2R) has adapted a successful model from Portland that combines tenancy education, a completion certificate that acts as a reference, and landlord guarantee fund (LGF). This combination helps youth who may face barriers access good housing and have successful tenancies. LGFs are key in reducing landlord concerns related to turnover and damages, and can be a positive deciding factor when choosing to rent to a young person. The Portland LGF demonstrates an increase in tenancy length, reduction in stigma and, since the introduction of the Landlord Guarantee Fund, only 0.6% of tenancies have ever had a claim submitted for damages. R2R, in partnership with communities, provides effective education and certificate recognized by BC Housing and BCNPHA members. Determining how to implement a Landlord Guarantee Fund is the next step. R2R will partner with Aunt Leah's Place, the Friendly Landlord Network (FLN) and youth advisers to research implementation, operation, and sustainability of an LGF for youth in care. While the FLN will serve as the primary case study for initial implementation, the research project will develop a 'How To' toolkit for broader use. The project activities will also engage key stakeholders including youth, community organizations, landlords and property managers. The scope of research will also include financial models for scaling and identify potential sources of seed funds for establishing an active LGF.
$25,000.00
2017

Realwheels Society

Act of Faith

We believe that theatre has the power and capacity to bring about social change, through the empathic understanding that results from audiences’ experience of and exposure to the ‘other’. Despite comprising approximately 14% of the Canadian population, one of the challenges of living with a disability is simply being seen. This project will challenge the stereotypical experience of people who use wheelchairs as invisible to society and culture. We propose that the Vancouver Foundation support the development and production of a new play. We have commissioned award-winning playwright Janet Munsil to write ACT OF FAITH, a play inspired by the true story of the inexplicable recovery from paraplegia by a Vancouver teacher/dancer, after 13 years of life in a wheelchair. We will contract a cast comprised of a combination of performers with disabilities and able-bodied performers. Foundation funding will support laboratory exploration of a new, hybrid art form and its realization in production. By employing mixed-ability (or ‘integrated’) wheelchair dance as a means of storytelling, we will find alternatives to the usual pattern of storytelling, a departure from habitual forms. Our process will test the capacity for integrated dance to challenge stereotypes of disability as a negative experience. This is a compelling and innovative way to push the boundaries of theatre, and has the correlated benefit of shifting audience perceptions of disability in a completely new way.
$35,000.00
2017

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