Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Reconciliation Canada

Reconciliation & Resiliency Platform

Through economic reconciliation, it can create the conditions for transformation. Economic reconciliation is more than economic development. It defines prosperity more broadly than income and assets. It goes beyond economic transactions and considers the economy of relationships. It looks at systemic barriers that inhibit prosperity. It requires creating new models that reflect Indigenous ways of knowing, considering all factors that impact prosperity, including health, education, culture, and connection to the land. Reconciliation will be unsustainable if it does not translate into improved livelihoods and a more prosperous future for all.
$10,000.00
2017

Richmond Art Gallery Association

East/West Connections through Culture

Addressing systemic social separation in Richmond through inter-generational, multicultural and multilingual programs including workshops, social events and exhibitions. We will encourage cross-cultural exchange, creating a platform to interrogate the systemic barriers to increased respect and relationship building across cultural lines. We seek to position the gallery as a welcoming institution for newcomers as a site to engage with art. Visual art offers an alternative communication that goes beyond language, connecting with groups of many cultural backgrounds. Richmond is a prime site to develop a multicultural, intergenerational dialogue, considering art and urgent local/global issues.
$10,000.00
2017

Richmond Food Bank Society

Communities Mobilizing for Justice - Addressing Poverty through Dialogue to Action

Our project, 'Communities Mobilizing for Justice' aims to examine, influence and change the systemic behaviours, rules and processes that create barriers to access for people experiencing poverty and do not address the social determinants of health. These people are disproportionately single parents, seniors, immigrants, youth, LGBTQ, disabled people and people with mental health and/or addiction issues. With networking, skills-building and mentoring, this project gives voice to the unheard, and encourages inclusion and participation for people experiencing poverty so they can actively advocate and promote their collective ideas for change and be decision-makers in the larger community.
$61,500.00
2017

Sea to Sky Community Services Society

Squamish Youth Engagement Strategy (YES)

In a very real way, youth are the life force of any community. They will grow to be decision makers, policy developers, teachers, business owners and care givers. We have an obligation to engage with youth in a meaningful way, to value their voice as an integral part of the fabric of our community, and to then weave this voice into the decisions that shape our future. We are committed as a community, to creating a Youth Engagement Strategy that focuses on bringing youth, not only to the table, but places them at the center of the conversation that answers this question: "How can we as a community successfully engage with youth in a way that supports their healthy growth and development?"
$10,000.00
2017

Simon Fraser University - Faculty of Environment

Low Carbon Resilience: Practitioners as Drivers For Sustainable Communities

Climate change requires us to reduce emissions (mitigation) and prepare for impacts such as flooding, sea level rise and heatwaves (adaptation). To date, climate mitigation and adaptation have been planned separately, but it's clear there are major benefits to integrating them - an approach called low carbon resilience (LCR). As we shift to a low carbon economy and begin upgrading infrastructure to withstand climate impacts, we can save time and money using LCR approaches. This is good news for ecosystems, which are also challenged by climate change, as their health is central to innovative LCR approaches. This project facilitates and supports the role of professionals as LCR champions.
$75,000.00
2017

St. Paul's Foundation of Vancouver

Expanding Peer Involvement in Substance Use Care

Our project seeks to expand the involvement of the affected population – people who use drugs (PWUD) – within the substance use system of care. We see this as important and timely given the present overdose-related public health emergency. Our goal is to affect change by: • Reducing the stigma surrounding PWUD by involving them more extensively within the system of care; • Training peer health navigators to be present on site at treatment facilities and to serve as linkages to care, thereby offering further support to those seeking substance use treatment; • Providing valuable feedback to health care providers by soliciting the feedback of PWUD on presently available treatment options.
$223,998.00
2017

Sunshine Coast Community Services

Improving socio-economic outcomes for adults living with mental illness

This project will bring together the Food Bank and Arrowhead Club House to test a volunteer and employment training initiative for adults living with mental illness. A key component will be the implementation of organizational change in the structure of the Food Bank to incorporate a capacity building training component for ADLMI that could lead to employment in the community and will incorporate long term sustainable employment in the food bank for adults living with mental illness. The results of this pilot will provide ongoing support to potential employers building our communities capacity to support this population and shift the communities perception of the abilities and positive contributions ADLMI can make to the health and well being of the community. Participants will have an increased sense of self worth, increased income, references for other employment and will have the skills and support to seek employment. Local employers, support services and adults living with mental illness will be engaged in workshops and dialogues to discuss the barriers and benefits of employing this population. These activities will shift their perception of ADLMI and increase their ability to support this population. In addition the new volunteers and employees will increase the Food Banks capacity to serve the community and to better serve users of the Food Bank who have Mental illness.
$49,040.00
2017

T'Sou-ke First Nation

T'Sou-ke Centre for Sustainability Housing Innovation

The T’Sou-ke Centre for Sustainability Housing Innovation project aims to address the housing crisis that exists within Canada’s First Nations communities. There are multiple systemic barriers that result in common issues such as overcrowding, mould contamination, poor construction and high energy costs. While there are many innovative technologies available, we believe that social innovation is needed prior to technical innovation. We are proposing to begin with community first. Our project will embody the traditional values and principles of the people. In this way, we’re bringing back traditional values in a modern context.
$225,000.00
2017

The Arthritis Society, BC & Yukon

Electronic Arthritis Triage Strategy (EATS)

The EATS Program serves to reduce barriers to treatment for people with arthritis. It will ensure appropriate treatment for their properly diagnosed arthritis by the appropriate healthcare professionals (HCPS), in a timely way that will help to reduce disease progression and disability. Earlier treatment will reduce the need for more invasive treatments including medications with higher side-effects and the need for surgery. This will be achieved through the development and implementation of an online triage tool that uses standardized examination questions where the responses are processed through a decision support system (based on BC Rheumatology guidelines) to determine the best route to treating their arthritis. EATS will generate a report summary of the patient responses combined with other key patient data from the healthcare system. This will be accessible by the primary care provider, rheumatologist and/or allied HCP. The result is the expedited referrals of high priority patients to rheumatologists, which improves specialist access, increases positive health outcomes for patients due to early disease intervention and reduces the need for costly medications. This will generate significant cost savings for the MoH. Our partnerships with healthcare professional bodies (rheumatologists, GPs & allied HCPs) will assist in the adoption and utilization of EATS.
$75,000.00
2017

The Bloom Group Community Services Society

Vancouver Mental Health and Addictions Systems - Collective Impact Project

The Vancouver MH & Addictions Collective Impact project is an initiative to strengthen the care systems for individuals living with mental health and/or substance use disorders. The project’s role in achieving reduced levels and frequency of crisis is not to directly deliver supports, but to better define, coordinate and integrate the work of the diverse partners providing services; from healthcare to housing, from education to law enforcement, and from government agencies to community groups. The project’s premise is that by creating a system that works in unison towards a shared set of measurable goals, future policy changes and new investments in services will have greater impact.
$36,000.00
2017

The MacMillan Family Foundation

About Us, With Us: A Fellowship Program With the Youth in Care Community

British Columbia has the highest rates of child poverty in Canada. The challenges facing B.C. youth in and from foster care in Vancouver are among the most acute in the country. At Discourse Media, our own analysis - after several months embedded in the youth in and from care community in Vancouver - found that the foster care system was most often presented in the context of conflict and crisis. The episodic news cycle pits politicians against advocates, provincial bureaucrats against regional bureaucrats, parents against the system. It casts families as broken. Stories are triggered by tragedy. There is little capacity in media for data analysis. Youth perspectives are largely left out, yet theirs are some of the most trenchant questions about the system. They need channels through which they can pose questions, amplify solutions and mobilize their knowledge. Discourse Media seeks Vancouver Foundation support for a youth in and from care fellowship program designed to build capacity with interested youth (engagement workshops, listening events and story-to-action meetings). As a first step, we will pilot a fellowship experience with a member of the youth in care community and embed them into our journalism team in Vancouver, with mentorship from Discourse reporter and producer Brielle Morgan, who focuses on child welfare. We have identified several youth who might qualify for a fellowship and will partner with the foundation on selecting a fellow and supporting their work.
$10,000.00
2017

Growing the Discourse — Journalism for Systems Change

Discourse Media proposes an ambitious plan to create: a permanent full-time child welfare reporter position; a permanent youth in/from care media fellowship; a deeply researched guidebook to support better media coverage and a national, collaborative network of journalists reporting on child welfare. In 2017, Discourse employed the only full-time child welfare “beat” reporter in Canada. This position is unique due to our commitment to relationship-building, community engagement and collaboration with youth. After spending a year asking questions about this system, we’ve been humbled by the sheer complexity of the system and honoured by people with lived experience who have spent time teaching us and pointing us to the many important stories that have gone untold. We want to play our learnings forward. We are motivated to change people’s impressions of media as a barrier to progress, and redefine media as a catalyst for positive social change. This grant would allow us to build on the work that we’ve done and expand it to meet the strong demand for better storytelling and reporting on this complex system. We want to work with our colleagues in media and community partners to spark solutions-focused conversations about child welfare that transcend regional systems and borders. We’ve seen that there’s appetite for this kind of network. Through this radically different, engagement-driven approach, we believe we can continue to shift the way media report on child welfare.
$25,000.00
2017

The Only Animal Theatre Society

SLIME

SLIME is a world premiere of a play by Bryony Lavery about the impact of climate change on ‘the great animal orchestra' from which we have become disconnected by our infatuation with the sound of our own voices. The play is set in a fictional conference on marine extinction. Audience are welcomed as conference delegates and seated among animals. You hear a dolphin at your elbow or a sea bird on your shoulder: animals too have something to say. We come together to face an absolute threat to life on earth—an insatiable creature taking over seas called SLIME. Like other forces in our 21st century lives, facebookslime or googleslime, SLIME moves with viral force, gobbling up all available resources. We must learn a new way to survive. This conference is the last hope for salvation. SLIME is an immersive event, where audiences are decision-makers with the world at stake. It requires us to tune into our animal sensibility and operate within natural systems instead of as super-predators. SLIME requires of its audience a new kind of listening - listening to our indivisible relationship with the biosphere. As we return from the world of the play to our lives, SLIME asks that we confront our connection to all inhabitants of the earth. The Only Animal's process of creation extends each show into a year of curated programming to more deeply affect audiences and issues. This year of SLIME also engages the ensemble in seeding future work creating legacy and impact in the community.
$50,000.00
2017

The Polis Foundation

ReFRESH Water Lab - Exploring the Future of the Columbia River Treaty

The reFRESH Water Lab, seeks to address transboundary watershed governance challenges.  The Lab will provide an opportunity to tackle the complex challenges of watershed governance in the context of a modernized Columbia River Treaty. Transboundary watershed governance is multijurisdictional with complex legislation, policy and institutional architecture that can challenge collaboration. The Lab will provide a structured yet creative process for deep collaboration among multi-disciplinary teams of diverse rights and stakeholders to work together on an interconnected challenge– How might ecosystem values be incorporated into Columbia River Treaty Governance?
$200,000.00
2017

The Salvation Army, British Columbia Division

Food Access Program

The Salvation Army wants to help clients to be able to access nutritious food and focus their efforts on becoming well, training for employment or advancement, attending to their families, children and keeping seniors in their homes as opposed to worrying about access to nutritious food. The Salvation Army will approach this by redeploying how we collect and deliver food to clients in the Lower Mainland. Meeting our commitment of reducing our carbon foot print, providing nutritious food and rejecting unhealthy donations and shrink our waste by encouraging closed loop recycling (take waste and turn it into a new consumer product). Feeding bodies minds and futures.
$10,000.00
2017

Theatre Conspiracy

Victim Impact

Victim Impact examines the Samji Ponzi scheme involving $110 million & over 200 victims – mainly the elderly in Surrey’s South Asian community.  Over two years, the project will fuse investigative journalism, community engagement, media and inter-disciplinary theatre. With direct community engagement in the creation, the project is a catalyst for education and outreach.. Engagement consist of: Research: Ongoing process attending court trials/hearings; interviewing victims & key players including lawyers, regulators, psychologists and victim support groups; sourcing/ analyzing of documents (transcripts; judgments; media, legal & accounting reports); research into financial law and practices.   Creation: October 2017 workshop - two weeks with artists of diverse practices, staged reading with community feedback session.   Podcasts: Five 35-45 min. episodes of interviews and dramatizations: Through the Samji case examine the causes of fraud; educate & provide context to recognize fraud; destigmatize victims; facilitate support networks; encourage participation in future episodes, workshops and theatre attendance.   Performance/ Events: Workshop Production Performance (PTC, 2017) and The Cultch Premiere Performance (Spring, 2018) will include community activities such as: Open rehearsals, post-show talks, a facilitated public forum by experts on financial law; facilitating dialogues with victim services; address the social stigma & its effects on families/ communities.
$40,000.00
2017

Tidal Elements Whole School Society

Returning to Place: Reintegrating Land-based Learning and Healing into Haida Gwaii Youth Programming

Land-based programming has been identified as a priority on Haida Gwaii by education, mental health, health care, and justice organizations, and most importantly, by youth themselves. Despite this, participation in on-the-land programming is declining and there is no sustainable funding for existing programs. A diverse group of organizations and community members across Haida Gwaii are invested in working collaboratively with youth to investigate the barriers to participation and rethink how we can effectively embed land-based programming into the way we educate and provide services to youth on Haida Gwaii, nurturing a life long, resilient relationship to land and place.
$10,000.00
2017

Tides Canada Initiatives Society

Our Water BC

Public engagement regarding BCs water supplies is rarely supported beyond consultation. It becomes incumbent on community groups to react to local threats and demand attention on freshwater issues. The passage of BCs Water Sustainability Act opened the door for more proactive opportunities for engagement on local water health. This project will capitalize on the opportunity and engage in public discussion on the values, needs and priorities of the local, grassroots community when it comes to water issues. Not only does this dialogue advance robust implementation of the WSA but it equips communities with the information, knowledge, and power needed to engage in discussions around local water.
$10,000.00
2017

re-VALUE 2.0

The binning population - characterized by self-reliance - is often overlooked and harmed despite its obvious positive environmental impact. Binners, also called urban recyclers, are an essential part of the fabric of a well-functioning city. They are a resilient group that have actively contested ideas and perspectives on their place in urban areas. Binners’ Project fosters grassroots leadership that is by and for binners. Over time, the Binners Project’s emerging initiatives are fostering the potential of this community. We work with binners to shift systems that currently leave binners at the margins of society. Re-VALUE vs. 2 enables binners to create change from the bottom up.
$225,000.00
2017

Tofino Botanical Gardens Foundation

Cigarette 'Bio-Digester' Development Project

Cigarette butts are a widespread and highly toxic watershed pollutant; and while community support for addressing this issue is strong, there is some disagreement about the best approach, and few natural, community-based solutions. We have identified a model which shows promise in turning cigarette waste into non-toxic soil and need support to develop it further and test for effectiveness and scalability. This project aims to offer a system of local and community-based remediation of cigarette waste that is low-cost, low-tech, and scientifically sound that empowers citizens, businesses, organizations and government to effectively reduce the amount of cigarettes affecting water quality.
$10,000.00
2017

UBC - Faculty of Dentistry

Growing Great Kids Out of Homelessness with Peer Support

Growing Great Kids Out of Homelessness With Peer Support proposes training & employing women who participate in programming at EFry as peer project advisors. Through the opportunity to experience themselves as co-creators of safe, supportive environments, women & children can restore their health & well-being while offering invaluable expertise regarding innovative approaches that have the potential to shift the paradigm of mother-child separation within correctional settings & beyond. Led by women affected by the issue, this participatory research project will create new knowledge & contribute to new policies necessary to make it possible for all people to not only matter but to thrive.
$211,584.00
2017

UBC - Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery

Beginning with the Seventies: Activism, Art & Archives

Our project will consist of three consecutive exhibitions, public programs and events, an online resource and book publication. Recognizing the resurgence of interest in social movements of the 70s: we will present Alexandra Bischoff’s reconstruction of the Vancouver Women’s Bookstore (1973-1996), including its inaugural inventory. Connecting with activist organizations and their archives as a resource: we will present a new collaboration by Marianne Nicolson and Althea Thauberger, supported by Union of BC Indian Chiefs researcher Robyn Laba. Recognizing that our collections do not reflect the diversity of art practices in the region: we will work with other institutions to explore our collections as a porous public resource in order to develop alternative narratives. Generating study and exchange between and among multiple generations of artists and activists: we will present new work by Dana Claxton, Ethel Gardner, Jeneen Frei Njootli and the ReMatriate Collective based on research into the Service, Office and Retail Workers’ Union of Canada (SORWUC). Embracing the idea of intergenerational citation in feminist, Indigenous and other cultural traditions: we will hire emerging artists and archivists and create opportunities to bring diverse communities together in dialogue. Together, the project destabilizes established narratives of contemporary art; opens up conversations about collections, and creates new research to leave as a legacy in the public record.
$225,000.00
2017

UBC - Office of Research Services

Supportive Movement

This project aims to leverage physical activity to improve the quality of life for pregnant and parenting women on the DTES. Through participatory action research, we will create, implement, and evaluate trauma and violence informed physical activity programming and resources to address community identified barriers and develop practical tools for organizations to enhance programs and experiences for women. Addressing individual and systemic changes may support this population in being physically active, create greater social cohesion in the DTES, and improve health and overall quality of life for pregnant and parenting women and their children.
$149,988.00
2017

UBC - The Collaborating Centre for Prison Health

Growing Great Kids Out of Homelessness

Children experiencing homelessness have poorer outcomes when compared to other children, their mothers often struggle with social isolation, and there is a strong link to entering the child welfare system. Growing Great Kids Out of Homelessness will address this issue and seek to influence system change by creating a collaborative, multi-sectoral, peer-led participatory research project. Through the opportunity to experience themselves as co-creators of safe, supportive environments, homeless women and children can restore their health and well-being in an environment of dignity that offers women increased agency and engagement with others, while keeping families intact.
$10,000.00
2017

Trauma at the Root: Exploring Paths to Healing with Formerly Incarcerated Men

The majority of incarcerated men have experienced trauma in their lives. These trauma experiences are often at the root of substance use, mental illness, and/or violence that lead to involvement in the criminal justice system and can also negatively impact men’s ability to reintegrate into the community. However, there has been little done to explore how to support men in healing from trauma. This project will engage formerly incarcerated men in participatory health research to explore ways to improve trauma supports for both currently and formerly incarcerated men. The findings can be used develop trauma-informed approaches and influence policies and programming from the ground up.
$224,709.00
2017

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