Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

UNIT/PITT Projects

A Plan for Artist-Run Culture in Vulnerable Communities

We wish to address artists' and cultural workers' complicity in the artwashing and culturewashing of urban development which causes or precipitates harm to the low-income communities whose presence we have benefited from for decades. We wish to develop an alternative plan for artist-run culture, especially addressing Chinatown and the DTES, and use the development of this plan to forge stronger community bonds, creating webs of support between artist-run culture and community self-advocacy. This represents a shift in our thinking, as a type of organization which has valued artistic autonomy above all else, to one which wants to construct a strong social praxis for art.
$10,000.00
2017

United Way of Central & South Okanagan/ Similkameen

Toward a Child and Family Poverty Reduction Strategy for the Central Okanagan

We seek to reduce stigma and empower families experiencing poverty, by creating connections and awareness of child and family poverty and its effects. There are many ways poverty is known to raise the risk of lifelong ill effects on health and reduce opportunities for children and youth to realize their full potential. Reducing the impact of family stress and linking families to services makes a difference, only if families feel safe and comfortable accessing those services. Reducing the stigma associated with reaching out for needed services is the first step in making long-lasting systemic change for families in the Central Okanagan.
$10,000.00
2017

University of Victoria - Faculty of Law

Mining Law Reform in British Columbia

While mining has been a key industry in BC, outdated regulations that are now below Canadian standards means that mining poses grave environmental and public health risks. Mine-affected communities and First Nations bear a disproportionate burden of this risk. This project aims to fix the root of mining challenges in BC by reforming old mining laws. In addition to raising public awareness about mining’s impact and the urgent need for law reform, it will deliver workshops to enhance public participation and highlight the need to take Indigenous rights into account. New mining regulation in BC will protect people and the environment, and decrease public liability for mining operations.
$150,000.00
2017

Human Rights within Indigenous Law: A collaborative toolkit for educators

We want to support Indigenous laws’ capacity to be applied, critically evaluated, openly debated, and adapted or changed as needed. Our vision is for Indigenous laws to be living and in use on the ground - to be researched, taught and theorized about just as other great legal traditions of the world are. Revitalizing Indigenous laws and building tools for engagement, such as this Indigenous Human Rights Toolkit, is essential for re-building healthy Indigenous citizenries and creating more respectful and symmetrical relationships across legal traditions in Canada. These are necessary steps to build and maintain robust reconciliation within and between peoples, now and for future generations.
$10,000.00
2017

University of Victoria - Office of Research Services

Future Anything: Supportive campuses for former youth in care

UVic has committed tuition support for four years and is committed to creating a welcoming environment that supports FYIC in their transition, connects them to supports, and facilitates success. Lilia Zaharieva, with support of Deb Rutman and Jim Anglin, prepared a report reviewing current literature, gathering perspectives from UVic FYIC, and making recommendations (From a Ward to Award, and Beyond). In keeping with the aims of Fostering Change, we propose to engage in “a strong dialogue, learning, action and capacity building process” with staff, faculty and FYIC at UVic, and to connect with and learn from other BC post-secondary institutions. Using participatory and evidence-based action-research strategies, project activities will engage FYIC as leaders/facilitators of change within UVic and across BC PSE. This grant will support the development, evaluation and refinement of a workshop that will be piloted at a UVic Staff Pro-D event in June. At a recent meeting of BC university VPs Student Affairs, there was “strong interest” and “no other university is doing such work” (Jim Dunsdon, UVic AVPSA, April 24). UBC and SFU are eager to offer this workshop, when available, on their campuses. In discussions on April 12, RCY representatives indicated interest in being involved in this initiative. Fostering Change support would enable this developmental and dissemination work and add credibility to a province-wide learning process for FYIC and those in PSE Student Services.
$10,000.00
2017

University of Victoria School of Social Work

Engaged research on implementations in response to overdose

This current proposal builds on a Vancouver Foundation Develop Grant (UNR15-0134) held by Wallace (with Pauly) in which we were immersed in community when drug overdose become a public health crisis and our results informing responses. Also, a NSERC Engage grant supported a unique partnership and the creation of a spectrometer drug testing instrument by the Co-investigator (Hore) with Vincent at STS Pharmacy. The advancement is novel due to the cost-effectiveness of the invention which allows for unprecedented scale-up and integration. Most recently, Wallace, Hore and Vincent were successful in an application to the Canadian Foundation for Pharmacy’s Innovation program to implement this technology, pilot drug checking and build capacity in Victoria BC. Our proposal pairs the piloting of this innovation in drug checking with community-based research through the partnership with AIDS Vancouver Island and its Street College program. Specifically, we will engage people who use drugs (PWUD) in research that can inform how drug checking can effectively be implemented and integrated in harm reduction. There is a lack of knowledge on many aspects of implementation such as; who may use or not use such services, what barriers exist to using the services, how individuals will respond to test results, how drug checking could impact the toxic illicit drug market, what opportunities drug checking may hold for reducing stigma, increasing access to supports, and develop relationships.
$70,000.00
2017

UVIC - School of Public Health & Social Policy

Reflecting Back, Looking Forward: Storytelling to Address HIV/AIDS Across British Columbia

HIV/AIDS persists despite advancements in HIV treatment and prevention due to persistent social inequities and stigma. In the early response to HIV/AIDS, affected communities banded together in fierce activism. Now, the earliest generation of HIV/AIDS survivors and their allies are passing away due to older age and suicide. We are loosing their stories and memories, which embody community resilience. Our novel community-based participatory oral history research project will document the experiences of these early HIV/AIDS survivors in a digital archive in order to preserve and share their cultural memories inter-generationally, re-invigorate prevention, and help eradicate HIV/AIDS in BC.
$75,000.00
2017

Vancity Community Foundation

Exploring Sustainable Youth Transitions Policy Advocacy in BC

In this project First Call (FC) will explore how we can continue to activate the FosteringChange advocacy platform thru our coalition’s collective resources & ongoing advocacy. A 1st step will be convening our youth-serving members & others engaged in supporting YIC transitions for a series of sharing & brainstorming discussions about their roles in research, youth engagement & youth leadership related specifically to raising public awareness & engaging in systemic advocacy. We will be looking for their ideas & interest in how FC can collaborate & provide a platform for more opportunities for youth to engage directly w/ decision-makers in proposing policy changes & increased public investments to improve outcomes for YI/FC, as well as monitoring the response from gov’t & other institutions. Many of the issues affecting YIC transitions (e.g. inadequate welfare rates, housing barriers, low wage jobs w/ no benefits, barriers to completing school, barriers to post-secondary, problems with access to needed health care, etc) also affect youth who are not from care & connect with the work of many different FC coalition members (unions, health org’s, educators, family support agencies, immigrant services, indigenous org’s, etc). Our exploratory discussions will extend to these other partners to identify ways for youth to engage in proposing solutions within & thru their org’s. These conversations will inform and shape a FosteringChange legacy dev'ment grant appl’n by FC later in 2017
$10,000.00
2017

Home Front: Making homelessness in Metro Vancouver rare, brief and one-time

Homelessness is a regional issue. Decisions made by one Metro Vancouver municipality can have an impact on its neighbours. A collaborative systemic approach to ending homelessness that engages government, business, philanthropy, non-profit organizations, community groups and citizens will make the best use of limited resources in order to make homelessness in Metro Vancouver rare, brief and one-time, and enable specific targeted strategies for vulnerable populations. Leveraging the skills and resources of many players to successfully achieve impact, Home Front will enhance the effectiveness of policies and strategies used in each municipality and engage the entire community in common cause.
$60,000.00
2017

Code Red: Tackling B.C.'s Affordability Crisis

Squeezed by high costs for housing and child care, precarious work, and mounting debts, many younger British Columbians feel trapped and unable to reach their potential. Far too many believe that the problem must be them… That they are failures. Gen Squeeze’s work begins with a powerful socioeconomic analysis that shows young people they are not alone, and that the problem is a multi-faceted and generational “squeeze." Combining evidence-based policies, broad-based collaborations, and grassroots organizing, our Code Red project is focused on reining in sky-high housing costs in Metro Vancouver, Victoria and elsewhere, which are hitting young British Columbians particularly hard.
$225,000.00
2017

$10aDay Child Care Implementation Project

Child care in BC is at a historic turning point. With public support and political will for systemic change now in place, we can move from child care chaos – high fees, long wait lists, under-valued early childhood educators - to child care system. We have a profound opportunity to turn community priorities into government policies and funding that will provide significant social and economic benefits across BC. CCCABC is the provincial leader on child care advocacy, bringing the $10aDay Plan to the forefront of the 2017 election. It is now in a powerful and unique position to engage families, communities and partners to guide effective implementation of a child care system for BC.
$195,000.00
2017

CEDSAC: A Poverty Reduction Project Creating Systemic Change

CEDSAC is committed to fostering a vibrant and inclusive local economy where all residents can prosper and live healthy and rewarding lives. In order to create the type of communities we seek, CEDSAC recognizes that all stakeholders need to collaborate to affect change. Policy makers, the business community, the social enterprise and non profit sector and residents need to collectively address community economic development issues in order to change the way neighbourhoods work. By facilitating this collaboration, CEDSAC harnesses the activities and investments of it's members to redefine the existing CED processes and meaningfully include community in policy development and implementation.
$150,000.00
2017

Community Impact Coop (CIC)

The CIC is a co-sharing training hub for unfunded advocacy groups of people in poverty lacking access to available resources due to poverty barriers and our charitable system. The CIC creates one entity that meets the needs of many excluded groups, redirecting the flow of established resources and building bridges across communities. The CIC Ethics of Engagement Project identifies barriers to inclusion of those with the lived experience of poverty in public-policy planning, partnering with government developing poverty reduction plans to create best practises and measurable outcomes that move people from ‘screaming’ to be heard on the outside of decision-making tables to leading the process.
$225,000.00
2017

Making ends meet: realities of low wage work and working poverty and healthy communities in BC

How does low wage poverty affect health and wellbeing in Metro Vancouver and how will policy changes impact this. There are significant policy changes impending at multiple levels including provincial and federal poverty reduction plans potential changes to how health care is funded and delivered, changes to how child care is delivered at a provincial level as well as significant increases to the minimum wage. This research will help us evaluate the impacts of these policy changes on the health and wellness of individuals, families and communities.
$225,000.00
2017

Enhancing Youth Transitions Policy Advocacy in BC

Anticipating the sunsetting of the Fostering Change Initiative (FCI) at VF, First Call (FC) is interested in helping sustain young leaders’ engagement in policy advocacy to fully achieve the system changes needed to support better transitions for youth aging out of care in BC. In our work on this, we’ve heard & observed that current policy advocacy for YI/FC happens in silos & primarily at the municipal level. By bridging the FCI network & a coalition of 101 orgs with a background in prov level policy advocacy, FC is well-positioned to further efforts for systemic change. Recent consultation with 25 orgs working w/ YI/FC, including young leaders, disability grps, immigrant services, Indigenous orgs, resid’l care providers, etc., told us: 1) Service agencies are looking for a place to hand off policy advocacy to & more ways to connect youth who want to do policy advocacy; 2) Existing YACs need support to come together, communicate, learn from each other. This project will build capacity for FC to work collaboratively with youth-serving orgs to engage & support YI/FC to participate & take leadership in the range of awareness & advocacy activities needed to inform policy-makers, build public support for greater transitions investments & monitor system change. The project will develop support for YI/FC interested in moving from self-advocacy to systemic advocacy thru training, networking w/ adult allies & other young leaders, mentoring, & opportunities to practice new skills
$150,000.00
2017

Vancouver Aboriginal Child and Family Services Society

Keeping Connected: A research project with youth aging into community

Youth in/from VACFSS care and adult co-researchers will: 1. Develop a supportive "exit interview" process for youth leaving care at 19 2. Develop a tool, to be used in dialogue between those youth and their workers, to measure youth connectedness to caring adults, culture and community 3. Pilot the exit interview and tool with VACFSS youth who leave care in the next 12 months 4. Incorporating the exit interview and tool, develop the tools, process and Ethics proposal for a longitudinal outcomes study to explore how youth connectedness changes and is best supported in the years after leaving care. It is planned that this study will be conducted in partnership with the McCreary Centre Society and will also engage youth served by MCFD and Collective Impact partners. The project will be informed by the work of the TRRUST Measurement and Caring Connections Clusters. It is prompted by the desire of our youth to strengthen community and cultural connectedness for care-leavers. Developed with the youth on our Research Working Group, the project will build their leadership capacity and research/advocacy skills, give workers improved tools to focus on youth connectedness, and deepen our partnership with the McCreary Centre Society. VACFSS is a unique position to undertake this kind of longitudinal outcomes study, as "aging into community" is part of our restorative practice and our workers/caregivers already keep in touch with many youth long after they leave care.
$10,000.00
2017

Vancouver Island Compassion Dogs Society

Assessing the Effectiveness of Team Training Veterans diagnosed with PTSD and their Service Dogs

PTSD is prevalent among veterans of the military and RCMP. VICD helps veterans cope with many self-destructive and anti-social behaviors symptomatic of PTSD by matching dogs with veterans and training them as a team to achieve BC service dog certification. VICD’s team- training model is innovative and produces improvements to veterans’ mental health and their interactions with family members and society. VICD will evaluate and document the best practices of its program. Based on the evidence, service dog trainers can improve their programs, and government agencies that fund and provide veteran health care will be able to make informed decisions about policies addressing PTSD treatment.
$10,000.00
2017

Vancouver Symphony Orchestra

VSO's New Chapter: Connecting People, Connecting Cultures

The VSO will create, experiment, produce, and disseminate 10 high-profile cultural events over the next three years chosen for topical and cultural relevancy that challenge the assumption that cultural institutions are discretionary resources for selected members of society. The adaptive power inherent in cultural institutions when they envision themselves as a civic asset will be tested via projects that focus on a broad spectrum of ages, ethnicities, socio-economic backgrounds, employing exceptional artistic talents to demonstrate the potential of social inclusion. We believe this deep and broad initiative to connect people and cultures will transform not only VSO’s current and future practice, but by sharing our findings, will transform the practice of similarly motivated institutions. VSO’s New Chapter focuses on three areas for their collective ability to foster change: 1. First Nations: Creation of a 3-year partnership of reconciliation beginning with First Nations Artist-in-Residence: Marion Newman, and ending with a multi-faceted First Nations-sourced commission to be performed in Vancouver, B.C. and Victoria, B.C. 2. Community Engagement: The “Beat of the Drum” commission will create music for all abilities; integrating deaf and disabled communities with all music lovers and genres collaborating with world-renown deaf percussionist Evelyn Glennie. 3. Gender Balance and Equality: Virtuosic female talent give voice to stories of our past, present, and future.
$225,000.00
2017

Victoria Community Food Hub Society Victoria Community Food Hub Society

Good Food Shift: addressing food insecurity through creating healthy food environments

The social challenge we are addressing is community health and wellbeing related to food insecurity. Food insecurity is up from 12% to 14% in the CRD in the last five years. Currently children and families in need are mainly served through downtown food banks. The Good Food Network is working with public institutions like schools, health and recreation centers, and community food hubs to find better ways to build healthy food environments (policy and programs) with connections, resources and access to food where families live, learn and play. With the Food Rescue project as a new lever, we can make the Good Food Shift now distributing 1 million pounds of fresh foods to community settings.
$165,000.00
2017

Victoria Cool Aid Society

Housing, Health & Well-Being Through Indigenous Cultural Community

In Greater Victoria, and throughout Canada, homelessness is a condition which afflicts the Aboriginal population disproportionately -- although First Nations comprise only 4.1% of the local population, 20-30% of the people Cool Aid serves in shelters identify as Indigenous. But they are under served. To improve Cool Aid's housing, healthcare and support services for Indigenous clients, we have partnered with the Victoria Aboriginal Coalition to End Homelessness to appropriately house and support more chronically homeless Indigenous people, develop cultural learning materials and training for staff (300 employees), and share the materials and results locally, provincially and nationally.
$192,000.00
2017

West Kootenay Environmental Centre

Engaging West Kootenay Industry Stakeholders in a Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Future

To avoid global warming beyond 1.5C by 2100 we need to decarbonize by 2050. Each country and community needs to do its fair share to transition to a 100% renewable energy economy to avoid the worst climate impacts. Cities are leading the transition at the community-level, which includes transportation, electricity and buildings. As cities lead, industry’s carbon pollution must be addressed to reach 100% renewable. We’re working with local governments and industry workers to clarify the government’s relationship with industry in the transition to renewables, and with local residents to garner support for renewable energy in communities that rely on carbon-intensive industry for local jobs.
$10,000.00
2017

Wildlife Rehabilitators Network

Exploring needs and capacity required for a provincial Wildlife Rehabilitation Resource Hub

There is an increasing demand for humane care for distressed wildlife in BC, paired with a growing public expectation that wildlife rehabilitators provide care that meets professional standards comparable to those in place for companion or exotic animals. There are not enough qualified wildlife rehabilitators to meet this need, and insufficient access to formal, relevant, and affordable training resources for aspiring or practicing rehabilitators. Identifying sustainable channels to increase the number of wildlife rehabilitators in BC will enhance wildlife welfare in the province while promoting public safety by ensuring distressed wildlife is humanely cared for by licensed professionals.
$10,000.00
2017

Williams Lake Indian Band

Circle of Strength Community Safety Project

Residential school and generational trauma have impacted First Nations communities and families in a range of different ways. When a family crisis occurs, or when a family is struggling, our usual approach has been to remove children from their families to protect them from further harm. This traumatizes both the children and their families. This project is about finding a different way. We want to work together with all the services in our community identify and reach out to families who are struggling sooner, provide support and resources to help them resolve the challenges they face, keep their children and the community safe, and support health family development.
$224,720.00
2017

WISH Drop-In Centre Society

Mainstream Employment Opportunities Initiative

Many women involved in street-based sex work are reliant on it as their sole source of income. Without alternative sources of income, women may put themselves at risk so that they can make a living. For women who wish to seek mainstream employment, opportunities are limited and barriers are high: e.g., stigma, lack of employment history, and criminal records. Facilitating mainstream employment opportunities for current and former sex workers will allow them to make safer choices, and to potentially see a path out of sex work if they choose to do so. Systemic changes have the potential to also create greater access to employment opportunities for other marginalized groups in the DTES.
$10,000.00
2017

Women Against Violence Against Women WAVAW Rape Crisis Centre

Inclusion Project: Community Consultation and Policy Development

Half of all transgender people will experience sexual assault. Although sexual assault supports exist in Vancouver none are designed specifically to support trans and gender non-conforming survivors and many services exclude them altogether. Since 1982, WAVAW Rape Crisis Centre has supported women who have been sexually assaulted. Through consultation with stakeholders in the trans and gender non-conforming community we will create a plan to provide sexual assault services to trans and gender non-conforming survivors. Developing support services that center the unique needs of trans and gender non-conforming survivors ensures that will have access to healing and justice after sexual assault
$10,000.00
2017

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