Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

New Neighbors Project - Newcomer Youth for Real Representation

This project will invite and support newcomer youth in exploring ideas and strategies that will amplify their voices, ideas, thoughts, and lived experiences in decision-making spaces in which they are currently entirely excluded from or are underrepresented. We will convene immigrant and refugee youth, along with staff and board members of the Association of Neighbourhood Houses of BC, in co-creation style facilitated dialogues that draw out, identify, and document the most effective and sustainable strategies and structures in order to have newcomer youth's voices captured at the board, governance, and decision-making level at ANHBC's neighbourhood houses. As neighbourhood houses are an important resource to newcomer youth, it is vital that newcomer youth are involved with the neighbourhood house's decision-making on community issues, which directly affect the livelihood of newcomer youth, their peers, and their families. MPNH's Newcomer Youth Leadership Group, along with our newcomer youth groups at fellow neighbourhood houses, will meet to form a city-wide Newcomer Youth Committee to design, implement and evaluate the project from beginning to end. Newcomer youth will meet, highlight key areas of exploration, and facilitate dialogue workshops. The results will be compiled by newcomer youth and the recommendations, strategies and best practices will be presented to ANHBC staff and Board of Directors with the goal of increasing genuine representation in decision-making
$10,000.00
2018

Astrolabe Musik Theatre Society

The Lake / n’-ha-a-itk

The Lake / n’-ha-a-itk is a musical documentary about, and that re-interprets as a film (the only Canadian opera on film), a historic BC opera integrated with contemporary syilx / Okanagan culture in an extraordinary cross-cultural collaboration. It addresses under-representation of Indigenous peoples; raises awareness of Canadian women composers; and removes barriers of access, changing an established social system which allows only certain segments to experience opera. Widely accessible through low ticket prices, community venues and, eventually, online, it liberates an entrenched art form, opening its doors to all.
$75,000.00
2018

Bill Reid Foundation

Indigenous Youth Governance

The project we are proposing is based on the research completed for the Develop Grant: Indigenous Communities Consultation Project (CCP). The Indigenous Youth Governance Project (YGP) is a three year long project that will seek to safely integrate Indigenous youth representation into the governance structure of the Bill Reid Gallery. We are asking the Vancouver Foundation to support Year 1 of this plan which includes the creation of an Indigenous youth board position in order to increase youth visibility at the leadership level of the organization. The Youth Candidate (YC) will be an Indigenous youth between the age of 16-24 and preference will be given to youth from the Squamish, Musqueam, and Tsleil-Waututh host Nations. The YC will receive an honorarium for their participation at Board and advisory meetings. Under regulation, Board members cannot receive remuneration, therefore we will work with the Board Chair and governance committee to determine an appropriate position title for the youth participant that will allow them to have a fulfilling governance experience and receive appropriate compensation for their expertise. The YC will undergo an orientation period with the Education Coordinator and learn about the Gallery's relationships with different organizations and artists. Near the end of the project, the YC will have the opportunity to develop youth oriented programming with the Education and Program Coordinator.
$10,000.00
2018

Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society

Changing the face of conservation

Conservation is based on a colonial model that has a long history of contributing to systemic oppression, devaluing non-white worldviews, and Indigenous erasure. Governments would move people off land, violate their title and rights, and designate the area a park or protected area. Not surprisingly then, land and ocean conservation movements, and the people that work in conservation, are predominantly white and middle class. Meanwhile, marginalized communities are often the most affected by changes in climate or the environment, and today’s youth will bear the long-term burden of our current choices. As part of our ongoing work to both decolonize our organization – and influence decolonization in the movement – and to create more spaces for marginalized voices in decision making processes, we would like to more proactively challenge the status quo. While we do more decolonization, anti-oppression and diversity, equity and inclusion work with our staff and board, we would also like to create two new roles on our staff team for young Indigenous youth and folks of colour. The goal would be to have them work directly within our program teams and be fully engaged in decision making, policy development (both at an organizational level and a government level), and all aspects of programming. They will be mentored by staff at the organization to develop strong skills, while having space to shape conservation plans with their own knowledge and experience.
$50,000.00
2018

Check Your Head: The Youth Global Education Network

Diversifying Youth-led Boards

Check Your Head is a youth organization led by young people on all levels of the organization. The board positions are open to youth and youth allies, and historically the vast majority of board members have been young people under 35. As such, our board of directors is unique in the non-profit sector, and there are lessons to be learned in the success in removing barriers to youth participation in the governance of the organization. However, this model also comes with its challenges. Structurally, young people and particularly Indigenous and racialized immigrant/refugee youth, don’t have the same level of experience, skills, networks and connections as older and more established individuals who serve on non-profit boards. For the vast majority of all our directors, serving on our board had been their first experience of this kind. This has created gaps in our capacity as the organization and has a number of implications for our work, the solutions to which we want to examine through this project. This project will: 1. Examine structural components of our success in operating for 20 years with a youth-led board so that they can be shared with the wider community and inform further work; 2. Develop solutions to address current gaps in the representation of racialized migrant/refugee and indigenous youth on our board of directors; 3. Build organizational capacity in maintaining a strong and diverse youth-led board.
$10,000.00
2018

Youth Building a New Economy

Young British Columbians face increasing economic pressures which contributes to growing poverty and economic inequality in our province. Youth Building a New Economy is a three-year project led by Check Your Head: the Youth Global Education Network that engages young people in addressing those issues, while also strengthening their economic independence. Through this economic justice leadership initiative, young people ages 15-25 from diverse Metro Vancouver communities will be trained, mentored and supported to work collaboratively with existing advocacy groups and other stakeholders to reduce poverty and build a better economic system.
$172,000.00
2018

Community Arts Council of Prince George

Northern Indigenous Artists' Collective - Youth Arts Administrator

In November 2017, the Community Arts Council of Prince George & District ("CAC") was awarded a Field of Interest Develop grant to support the steering committee of the newly formed Northern Indigenous Artists' Collective ("NIAC"), an unincorporated group, comprised of Indigenous artists, nested within the CAC. NIAC has worked hard over the past months to forge a pathway to become the first non-governmental Indigenous Arts Council in British Columbia. Some of the accomplishments of the group include having a public launch, holding workshops, creating communications platforms, creating a work / meeting space, circulating calls-to-artists for Indigenous arts initiatives, and advising the CAC on Truth and Reconciliation actions. The work of the NIAC under the auspices of the Field of Interest grant continue through the Fall of 2018. In a very short time, this new group has positioned itself as a strong voice for Indigenous Artists in Northern Interior BC. The next initiative is to hire a youth in paid employment position in a new role of "Indigenous Arts Administrator". This new role will mentor with the CAC Executive Director and the NIAC steering committee members. Activities that will occur with this new position and mentorship will include being a staff resource to local Indigenous artists seeking professional development / funding / marketing resources, helping to guide the group towards non-profit status, and helping with the coordination of a major arts event in June.
$16,300.00
2018

Dalai Lama Center for Peace and Education

Heart-Mind in Schools Project

The Dalai Lama Center wants BC children and youth to receive the best social-emotional learning possible—that is, an education that prepares them to cope with stress, get along with others, be compassionate, and solve problems peacefully. While the BC government has revised its curriculum to include expectations for social-emotional learning, few resources exist to help teachers integrate this transformative new curriculum expectation into their classrooms. The Heart-Mind in Schools project will provide educators the practical tools to integrate social-emotional learning into their classrooms—leading to a more holistic student education and a more compassionate and peaceful world.
$225,000.00
2018

EMBERS

Testing a new model of earnings for people on social assistance at Eastside Works (formerly the Lux)

Many people on income assistance are willing and able to work but can’t within our mainstream system. Living with a disability and receiving income support limits the ability to work, yet people can and want to work on a part-time/occasional basis. Eastside Works is a social innovation project that will increase income generating opportunities for people left out of the mainstream economic system and engage policymakers to inform systemic changes that ultimately reduce poverty in BC. We will affect change on all three levels: Individuals - help them earn income to improve their current circumstances Organizations - provide interagency coordination Policy - inform systemic change.
$225,000.00
2018

Emily Carr University of Art and Design Foundation

The Shumka Centre for Creative Entrepreneurship

Artists and designers face challenges including economic marginalization, disconnection from established spheres of entrepreneurial teaching, and widespread misunderstanding of their role in creating new ideas that have practical application in the world. But the impact that artists and designers could have on innovation in society is huge. Efforts to support professional development for artists and designers are often ill-suited to their specific needs. By identifying the barriers that they face in a changing social and technological environment; supporting great ideas; and applying business model development methods, a socially inclusive and economically impactful future is within reach.
$225,000.00
2018

Global Youth Education Network Society

Right Relations Advisor

The Right Relations Advisor (RRA) position will provide a pathway to non-profit leadership for a young, Indigenous professional that extends beyond the frontline work that racialized youth are often silo-ed within. The RRA would provide organizational leadership that challenges how we, as the non-profit sector, are complicit in perpetuating colonial structures - and confront this head on! The RRA would focus on 3 strategies: - Lead genius in decolonizing our organizational systems: We believe that before we can demand better of others, we must demand better of ourselves. This work would include decolonizing our base curriculums, providing training, and examining our administrative systems, and /or other organizational systems that are rooted in processes that create barriers to true equity - Convene Indigenous and non-Indigenous young progressives: The non-profit sector is not immune to systemic racism - in fact, we can be the most blind to it! The RR Advisor will spark local conversations that bring together young professionals in a series of workshops and dialogue series to name & tackle these systemic blindspots in a community-driven report - Praxis: The burden of anti-oppression work often falls to those who are most affected by oppressive systems. It will be important for this role to be one of both teaching and learning. Through our partner, IndigenEYEZ, the RRA will have access to Indigenous-centred coaching, elder support, and professional development
$41,000.00
2018

HIPPY Canada (Home Instruction for Parents of Preschool Youngsters)

Aboriginal HIPPY East Vancouver Project

Our project will address systematic marginalization of Aboriginal women and children who live in urban centres. Through a collaborative effort, we propose to revamp the program service delivery model to diminish the challenges of sole parenting, abject poverty, and domestic violence faced by Aboriginal women and children – who bear the brunt of economic disadvantage and social isolation. Our program will leverage the resilience demonstrated by Aboriginal peoples and bring isolated mothers and their children into a position of social productivity and cultural awareness, while developing the capacity of urban Aboriginal parents to support their children’s success in school.
$225,000.00
2018

Indian Summer Arts Society

Taike: South Asian & Indigenous Artistic Collaborations

Indian Summer Festival's ‘Taike’ project is intended to bring together South Asian and Indigenous artists in meaningful collaborations and conversations. With our mission to create an inclusive, diverse and culturally-rich society, our curatorial practice is to center and amplify South Asian voices in conversation with other artistic communities. The addition of the Taike programming is to support solidarity between South Asian and Indigenous communities through the arts. Please visit www.indiansummerfest.ca for more background on the project and the word 'Taike'.
$90,000.00
2018

Kamloops Indian Band

Youth-Leadership-Action

Tk’emlups te Secwepemc’s (TteS) project entitled Youth-Leadership-Action will develop the unique leadership skills that youth required in Indigenous organizations, by combining traditional knowledge and protocols with contemporary leadership skills and methods. Indigenous youth will learn local protocols such as Welcoming Ceremonies that are regularly practiced within the community and traditional territory. Supported by elders, the transfer of knowledge inter-generationally will provide a platform for youth to augment their self-awareness and identity, and build community connectiveness that will increase their leadership abilities and motivate them to participate within the community as leaders. The project will consist of four key components that will build on the necessary skills and abilities of today’s Indigenous leaders. The four components: Cultural Protocols and Teachings, What it Means to be a Leader, Goal Setting, and Community Leadership in Practice, will provide them with the theoretical knowledge and practical experience needed to hold leadership positions within the community and organization.
$36,900.00
2018

Kickstart Disability Arts and Culture

Access to the Arts for All

While many of Vancouver’s cultural institutions have provided physical accessibility to their facilities, often that is where the accommodations ends, and little thought is given to bear on providing a full range of accessibility to the artistic expressions within, to a wider range of people who live with other disability barriers. Kickstart would like to expand and re-orient its annual public presentation events series, with the intention to work with a series of arts and or cultural institutions over the course of three years to help open the doors of these institutions to having their programming reach a larger part of society.
$150,000.00
2018

Kokoro Dance Theatre Society

KW Studios Accessibility Project

The Downtown Eastside of Vancouver is challenged by issues of homelessness and housing, addiction and mental illness, the health crisis, and crime. Arts by themselves cannot address these issues directly, but they can have a beneficial effect by developing a sense of community, of improving the quality of life, and contributing to positive change in local economies, social environments, neighbourhood character, and demographics. Through providing subsidized access to Kokoro Dance's new state of the art KW Studios, this project will influence system change by building a stronger sense of a creative DTES community of engaged and productive performing artists.
$225,000.00
2018

McCreary Centre Society

Increasing leadership roles and opportunities for Indigenous members of the Youth Research Academy

In 2016 McCreary opened the Youth Research Academy (YRA) to train youth with care experience to conduct community-based research. To date, two cohorts have graduated and a third is in operation. The success of the YRA has attracted other funders and led to contracts with agencies which have helped make the YRA sustainable. Following the graduation of the first cohort, a YRA Alumni was formed to provide opportunities for graduates to contribute to ongoing projects and mentor new members during their induction. In 2018 this role was expanded to include greater responsibilities and leadership opportunities, and the position was extended to ten months. The position is currently held by an Indigenous member of the YRA Alumni who, in addition to providing mentorship to Indigenous members of the YRA, has assumed a leadership role on projects which aim to improve outcomes for Indigenous youth. Feedback collected through evaluation surveys have suggested the value of this role in promoting cultural safety and inclusion for Indigenous youth. Following the success of this temporary 9 hour a week position, this project seeks to create the role of Indigenous Peer Engagement Coordinator to increase engagement of Indigenous youth in the YRA, YRA Alumni, McCreary’s Aboriginal Advisory Committee (AAC), staff and Board. The role would offer ongoing employment to an Indigenous youth who faces barriers to employment and provide training to enhance their leadership and workplace skills.
$49,700.00
2018

Neworld Theatre Society

The Complicated Whole: Performing Inclusion Across Perceptions of Ability

Arguably much of the world is rooted in a history that excludes people with developmental disabilities. Often our culture focuses on what people are unable to do, as opposed to what they are good at. Three years of work between artists with and without developmental disabilities has shown us that, given the opportunity to collaborate equally with professionals, people with developmental disabilities are extraordinary artists, with extraordinary and specific strengths. This project showcases those strengths through the development of a performance ensemble, the production and tour of three shows, and dissemination of our creative model across the Lower Mainland, Canada and the US.
$96,250.00
2018

Pacific Opera Victoria

Presentations of a new First Nations children’s opera by Haida artist Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas

Young people have few opportunities to engage with quality performances that explore issues of contemporary cultural importance. Pacific Opera Victoria and Vancouver Opera will commission and present a new First Nations children’s opera that explores environmental stewardship and individual empowerment. Adapted by renowned Haida artist Michael Nicoll Yahgulanaas from his book Flight of the Hummingbird: A Parable for the Environment, this new production model invites youth to participate in the creation process by providing feedback at workshops. The completed opera will be presented in schools and Indigenous communities throughout British Columbia.
$205,000.00
2018

Powell Street Festival Society

Advocacy and Outreach Through Arts-based Community Development at WePress (Years 2 and 3)

The Powell Street Festival Society is partnering with WePress on an exciting new project that harnesses the power of arts and culture to bring money, skills, and opportunities to low-income and marginalized people, while engaging professional, emerging, and self-taught artists to create new works and build community. WePress is an inclusive, accessible artspace that provides workshops, events, studio time, and access to its letterpress and equipment while hiring low-income DTES artists, thus re- directing the flow of resources to those who need them most, and helping to improve participants' mental health and quality of life.
$150,000.00
2018

Presentation House Theatre

Learning and Forgetting

Young children entering the schools for the first time can have a tough time socializing, adding stress and challenge to their teachers and the school system. Parallel to this, seniors, in particular those developing dementia are experiencing more and more isolation being cut off from their communities as they enter long term care facilities. Presentation House Theatre is exploring a new program and performance experience that brings these two groups together for a shared, inter-generational connection involving live performance and interactive workshops that will increase the socialization of young children, while reducing the sense of isolation and disconnection for seniors.
$75,000.00
2018

Runaway Moon Theatre Arts Society

Birds, Birds, Birds

In August 2018, scientists and bird enthusiasts from around the world will flock to the 27th International Ornithological Congress & 1st Vancouver International Bird Festival. We’ll greet them with a grand opening parade along the seawall. Birds on stilts! Bird puppets! Bird flags & Bird choruses, representing and celebrating local and migratory birds from our communities. Workshops between now and next summer in Vancouver, Victoria, Vernon and smaller communities will foster greater participation in the congress and festival, and create one large body of birds on stilts as the central parade element. Parade workshops in July/August will grow momentum leading up to the opening event.
$45,000.00
2018

Sierra Club of British Columbia Foundation

Right Relations: Centering Indigenous Leadership for the Environmental Non-Profit Sector

This project provides an opportunity for an Indigenous youth to lead the development of a Sierra Club BC outings program, as well as engage with senior staff and a board committee to strengthen organizational policy and approach to Indigenous relations, with mentorship from Indigenous elders and Indigenous board members. Sierra Club BC's Board of Directors recently called for an Indigenous solidarity lens to be applied to all we do. This builds on steps already taken: recruiting two Indigenous directors to the board; cultural sensitivity training for all staff (through Indigenous Perspectives Society); educating board members (presentations from Indigenous directors, participatory blanket exercise, hearing from a local elder); convening an Indigenous Rights and Solidarity sub-committee of the board (to provide input and direction); revising our education programs to better respect Indigenous knowledges; and, across all campaigns, seeking to follow and uplift leadership of Indigenous peoples—e.g. our Pull Together initiative raises funds for Indigenous-led legal challenges. The outings project (launching January 2019) originated when T’Sou-ke Nation knowledge-keeper Charlene George~kQwa’ste’not approached us to co-develop with her a place-based program that would deepen Sierra Club BC’s relations with local nations, build respect for Indigenous worldviews, and highlight best practices for how ENGOs can be in ‘right relations’ with the land and Indigenous peoples.
$50,000.00
2018

The Polygon Gallery

Speaking Pictures (Photographs and Oral Histories)

Arts and culture institutions have historically separated photographic representations and oral accounts of events, while prioritizing the validity of the photograph qua historical record, resulting in the exclusion of oral accounts in the presentation of culture and history. The Polygon Gallery’s Speaking Pictures project will facilitate a change in this largely unexamined dichotomy. It will include an exhibition of historical photographs of Vancouver’s North Shore, combined with oral histories relating to the photographs. Through witnessing this presentation, audiences will broaden their expectations, and the presence of multiple sources for a story should come to be expected.
$44,000.00
2018

Tides Canada Initiatives Society

Howe Sound/Atl'kitsem Marine Reference Guide - Indigenous youth engagement

This project’s goal is to build capacity for Sk_wx_wu´7mesh (Squamish) Nation youth to be leaders in non-profit sectors associated with resource management in their traditional territory. We will achieve this goal by involving Squamish Nation youth in the Howe Sound/Atl’kitsem Marine Reference Guide (MRG). The MRG is a multi-stakeholder initiative whose goal is to improve marine health in Atl’kitsem by creating decision-support tools and processes that include perspectives from First Nations, governments, and stakeholders. The MRG’s outcomes will affect Squamish Nation youths now and throughout their lives. Accordingly, they must be represented in its planning, leadership and delivery stages. The MRG is in its planning phase. During this project two Squamish Nation youths will work as staff members on the MRG’s management team. They will work with community and project mentors to outline strategies for connecting traditional knowledge with resource management processes. They will also facilitate meetings to engage Indigenous youth in marine initiatives and participate in community stakeholder meetings organized through the MRG. Through this work, Squamish Nation youths will strengthen their collaborative leadership and community engagement skills and their relationships with mentors and stakeholders. These outcomes will advance their leadership role in Atl’kitsem and build their capacity to influence underlying socio-political systems associated with resource management.
$10,000.00
2018

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