Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Tides Canada Initiatives

Howe Sound/Atl'kitsem Marine Reference Guide - Indigenous youth engagement

This project’s goal is to build capacity for Sk_wx_wu´7mesh (Squamish) Nation youth to be leaders in non-profit sectors associated with resource management in their traditional territory. We will achieve this goal by involving Squamish Nation youth in the Howe Sound/Atl’kitsem Marine Reference Guide (MRG). The MRG is a multi-stakeholder initiative whose goal is to improve marine health in Atl’kitsem by creating decision-support tools and processes that include perspectives from First Nations, governments, and stakeholders. The MRG’s outcomes will affect Squamish Nation youths now and throughout their lives. Accordingly, they must be represented in its planning, leadership and delivery stages. The MRG is in its planning phase. During this project two Squamish Nation youths will work as staff members on the MRG’s management team. They will work with community and project mentors to outline strategies for connecting traditional knowledge with resource management processes. They will also facilitate meetings to engage Indigenous youth in marine initiatives and participate in community stakeholder meetings organized through the MRG. Through this work, Squamish Nation youths will strengthen their collaborative leadership and community engagement skills and their relationships with mentors and stakeholders. These outcomes will advance their leadership role in Atl’kitsem and build their capacity to influence underlying socio-political systems associated with resource management.
$10,000.00
2018

Inner Activist - Engagement and Building capacity with diverse young adults

The Inner Activist (IA) completed a comprehensive research project in 2006-2010 that acted as the foundation for the IA project, and the development of our course curriculum to date. The premise was to address and support the connection between our own individual development, intentions, and our external impacts and actions for change in the world, also taking into consideration systemic issues and oppression. However, the IA has recognized that it needs to do more in order to be reflective of more diverse populations, and be more responsive to the complex issues the world is facing. This comes with a strong commitment to diversify the IA spaces of decision making, together with strengthening the offerings through courses, workshops and events that build leadership with more diverse populations, in particular, young adults, racialized immigrant youth and indigenous communities. The IA is seeking support through this grant to increase job security for the Engagement and Events Manager, who is a young Muslim woman, and increase the resources offered to help young adults become coaches at the IA courses, in order to build their capacity through mentorship and community engagement with the hope of them eventually expanding their role with IA.
$44,444.00
2018

Organizing for Change

British Columbians hold strong environmental values, yet environmental issues are not prioritized by elected decision makers. Politicians don’t believe these values strongly influence voting choices, and this disconnect hinders policies to address environmental challenges. We change how people act in the political arena to ensure their environmental values are a key part of the debate regardless of who is in government. We do this by working with environmental groups, large and small, to improve their engagement organizing efforts on their own issues, connect them more effectively to decision makers, and make it easy for them to ensure their supporters get out to vote come election day.
$250,000.00
2018

Tla'amin Nation

Community Suicide Intervention and Prevention Plan

This project seeks to address the systemic causes of suicidality, specifically, the historical and present colonization of First Nations peoples and Tla’Amin Nation specifically. It is necessary to address these issues so that our suicide prevention and intervention efforts empower and restore the Nation to their connection with each other and with the land. The Develop process will open the discussion of the Nation’s pre- and post-contact history, so that there is understanding around the challenges they face today. These discussions, undertaken by many community representatives, will bring to light shared values that will be a foundation on which to plan suicide prevention projects.
$20,000.00
2018

Tsay Keh Dene First Nations

Integrating Climate Change into Cross-Cultural Decision-Making Processes

Natural resource decision-making needs to better reflect the impacts and uncertainty posed by a changing climate, including reconciling how climate change challenges the culturally different approaches to decision-making taken by Tsay Keh Dene (TKDN), government agencies and industry proponents. The uncertainty is destabilizing systems, which creates an opening for redesigning decision-making processes. TKDN has launched a community-based climate monitoring program. This project will align with the monitoring program to explore how both scientific and traditional knowledge can be consistently used by all decision-makers to ensure a strong, climate-conscious future for TKDN.
$20,000.00
2018

UBC Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP)

Community partnerships to foster wellbeing of children and families in the Kootenay Columbia Region

The early years are optimal for investing in the future of our society, as early experiences are critical for brain development, lifelong learning, and wellbeing. BC data show that 1-in-3 children are vulnerable at school entry. To change this, we need to enhance our capacities to locally identify families’ and children’s needs and provide supports to families with young children early. This partnership project implements a universal early child development data platform in the Kootenay Columbia Region, to connect families to existing support systems, and to inform community-level decision making, strategic planning, and resource allocation in the local early years sector.
$132,485.00
2018

United Chinese Community Enrichment Services Society (S.U.C.C.E.S.S.)

Understanding barriers to employment: Intersectionality of immigration status, gender and disability

Obtaining employment within the formal labour market has become a pervasive challenge with implications for individuals, communities and societies. The exclusion of refugees with disabilities from the labour market restricts the potential contributions that this population could make to economic prosperity and social cohesion. Collaborating with female refugees who have disabilities, their caregivers, and front-line service providers from employment, disability, and settlement service sectors will enable us to better understand and address aspects of neoliberal activation and austerity measures that shape the experiences of those seeking and supporting labour market participation.
$19,224.00
2018

Unlocking political potential: addressing the root causes of participation and apathy in immigrant communities

Immigrants participate in politics at lower rates than those born in Canada. To ensure the future health of Canada’s social and democratic foundations, under-participation must be addressed. While community organizations have mobilized to extend voting rights to permanent residents, electoral opportunities alone will not solve participatory gaps unless immigrants also feel that they belong in the political community, can make an impact on it, and are invited to participate. This project will develop a plan for systems-level interventions to make politics interesting, relevant and engaging in the everyday lives of immigrants and to help community leaders mobilize participatory potential.
$18,589.42
2018

University of British Columbia

Chilliwack Overdose Response Project

Our project’s goal is to help address the overdose crisis in the Fraser East region, which has been one of the hardest-hit regions in BC. To date, most research has focused on urban settings, and more rural communities have lacked qualitative research that would lead to a deeper understanding of the systemic issues tied to the crisis and give rise to meaningful, appropriate action. Convening grant funds will be used to engage additional people affected by the crisis and to develop a participatory action research plan. Partnerships will address challenges around effective practice related to supporting individuals and families impacted by the OD crisis in Chilliwack and the Fraser East.
$20,000.00
2018

An Evaluation of Safer Opioid Prescribing (AESOP): The AESOP Study

There is a growing prescription opioid misuse problem in Canada that has been associated with epidemic rates of overdose. Hospitals have been identified as an important setting contributing to this problem given that individuals using opioids regularly come into contact with hospitals and since initial opioid use often occurs in hospitals. We propose to implement and evaluate a health systems intervention of an opioid stewardship program, which consists of a real-time audit and feedback monitoring system alongside physician education. Findings from the project will provide evidence to address inappropriate opioid prescribing which could be applied in a wide range of hospital settings.
$137,850.00
2018

Building an AnimalKind community

Any company can call itself “humane”, but how can the public be sure? AnimalKind accreditation sets the gold standard for animal-related businesses by incentivizing ethical and humane practices. AnimalKind businesses must meet science-based animal welfare standards set out in the strict program requirements and pass audits to receive the BC SPCA stamp of approval. For wildlife and rodent control, AnimalKind helps to raise public awareness that even pests deserve humane treatment. Expanding to all regions of BC could affect millions of wild animals. Scaling accreditation to pet services will positively influence the lives of hundreds of thousands of animals and their guardians in BC.
$300,000.00
2018

Substance Use and Addiction Services Engagement Among Vulnerable Youth

In Greater Vancouver, the problem of youth substance use is generating unprecedented alarm in the context of an opioid overdose crisis. As attempts are made to develop a more comprehensive youth addiction services system locally, new research is urgently needed to delineate the complex individual, social, structural and environmental contexts that influence the effectiveness of different services, and to identify how these services can best be adapted to meet the unique needs of vulnerable youth. Our study integrates participatory action and qualitative research methods, and will inform ongoing efforts to improve the youth addiction services system in Greater Vancouver.
$242,100.00
2018

Scaling Deep and Scaling Up: Indigenous Food and Farm School Challenge

Indigenous peoples play a keystone role to conserving biodiversity and cultural heritage of humanity. The Scaling Deep and Scaling Up: Indigenous Food and Farm School Challenge will chart a pathway of consciousness for a more just and sustainable tribal economies based on Indigenous food sovereignty and holistic health, and will provide an alternative to the large scale resource based extraction projects that impose contradicting cultural and socio-economic values, and place Indigenous women, children, and families at increased risk. The project will set the context for increasing social capacity and advancing policy driven by a community of regenerative practice.
$300,000.00
2018

Testing a Support Model to Address Gaps in Service that Contribute to Migrant Agricultural Workers’ Vulnerability in the Okanagan Valley

Migrant agricultural workers in BC face specific and complex challenges that impact their health and wellbeing. Challenges include their precarious legal status, coercive workplace conditions, substandard housing, and health care access barriers. Although these issues are well documented, we still do not know what model can best address these concerns. Our team will test a multi-year social support model based on the guidance of migrant agricultural workers and involving the coordinated efforts of community organizations and researchers with expertise in healthcare, law, and advocacy. This research will help build local capacity to support migrant agricultural workers in the region.
$146,639.20
2018

University of Northern British Columbia

Policy Lab for Agricultural Land Use Planning in BC

Although agricultural land issues are well known, old problems are taking on new forms that threaten farmland. At the same time, greater concern for food security and increasing demand for access to farmland for new farmers reflect public priorities that emphasize the social value of preserving farmland. These circumstances require a unique response. Our idea is to develop a “policy lab” that brings AgLUP experts together to focus on solutions to protect BC’s farmland. A policy lab is a neutral, expert-centred space for analyzing issues and designing solutions that address intractable policy problems and advance systemic change.
$2,500.00
2018

University of Victoria

Understanding the contraceptive health care needs of patients in British Columbia

Most Canadian women will use some form of birth control during their lives, but contraceptive failure is common. Contraceptive failure is often the result of patients being prescribed a method they are not fully informed about how to use and that does not fit their unique needs, and leads to a significant number of unintended pregnancies each year. This grant will bring together patients, researchers, educators, and healthcare providers to develop a research project that will explore what patients need and want out of contraceptive care. This information can then inform improvements to the system in BC so that everyone who wants it has access to contraception that fits their needs.
$20,000.00
2018

Refugee resettlement and trauma: Developing strategies for collective action

We want to understand how culturally safe and accessible responses to trauma and violence can be effectively implemented and integrated within refugee resettlement processes in Victoria BC. Trauma and violence are frequently associated with refugee and resettlement experiences and have lasting impacts on settlement processes. Yet, resettlement services maintain a pragmatic focus on language and employment with no explicit response to mental health. The study will uniquely engage researchers, settlement and mental health service providers in Victoria and refugees to identify research questions and action priorities that will inform an in-depth research study on this issue across Canada.
$19,957.25
2018

B.C. Water Leaders: consolidating a strategic core and expanding the network to advance freshwater sustainability

95% of British Columbians agree that fresh water is our most precious natural resource. Yet, freshwater issues are escalating, and the status quo approach is insufficient for today’s challenges. This project will amplify an existing network of B.C. water leaders that can help advance the legal, institutional, and social changes needed to improve freshwater sustainability. From applying expert and community-based solutions, interventions on water law/policy, supporting Indigenous capacity building, and mobilizing communities around their home waters, an expanded and strategic B.C. water leaders network will generate bottom-up and top-town action for lasting water sustainability.
$225,000.00
2018

“Our Trans Health Initiative”: A Community-Based Participatory Study of Transgender Population Health in British Columbia

What is the state of health for trans people across BC and is it improving? Elsewhere we know trans people have poorer mental health, worse health access, and experience greater discrimination. This is a public health and social justice issue. Our Gender Diverse Council of BC will oversee this community-based participatory research project, which has three ongoing phases: capacity building, community consultation, and data collection. Our team has extensive experience to ensure this research informs policy and programs to reduce health disparities for trans people. Half of our team are trans people and we are committed to supporting the next generation of trans researchers and leaders.
$300,000.00
2018

Looking Back and Looking Forward: Critical Reflections on Tent Cities

People living in poverty and homeless have less access to and quality of health and social care. Yet, tent city residents and their supporters claim that tent cities improve health and well-being through secure shelter, community participation and belonging, and better access to health and social services. This convene grant will bring together people living (and formerly living) in tent cities along with those providing political, health, and social support in tent cities to identify research priorities and next steps in the fight for access to dignified and affordable housing, health and social care.
$19,661.00
2018

Improving Access to Palliative Approaches to Care for Vulnerable and Marginalized Populations

Homeless people die at half the age of the general population. They often die alone, in shelters, or on the streets without good care. Our research team has learned from homeless people, their families, service providers, and key stakeholders about what our community needs to improve death and dying for people without homes, money, and support. We have committed clinical resources (doctor, social work, and nursing) to improve care for these populations. Now, we want to know how best to move this project forward. To do this, we will bring together a group of people who are living and working in palliative care and homelessness to change the way that care for dying happens in this population.
$299,373.40
2018

UVIC - School of Public Health & Social Policy

UVic Technology Inclusive Employment (TIE)

The UVic Technology Inclusion Education (TIE) project will address the issue of the unemployment and under-employment (and the attendant social isolation and poverty) of disabled persons, including those who have received post-secondary education. There will be a particular emphasis on creating educational training tools and modules specific to technology that will be geared to employees and potential employers. The goal is to create more employment opportunities for disabled persons who will work in a fully inclusive and accommodating environment. The TIE program will engage disabled adults across a broad spectrum of disabilities, giving them a unique opportunity to develop their skills.
$118,500.00
2018

Vancity Community Foundation

Creating Inclusive Schools for Low income Students and Families

Through the engagement of low income parents and students alongside teachers, this project will develop and deliver learning activities for school teachers, principals, trustees and parents designed to deepen their understanding of the systemic causes of family poverty and the way income inequality is experienced by poor students and parents in schools. Working with one diverse urban school district over 3 years, we will develop, test and deliver workshops for these different audiences with the aim of eliminating discriminatory practices and policies affecting low income students’ full inclusion and empowering low income parents and students to be part of the advocacy for these changes.
$10,000.00
2018

Indigenizing Poverty Reduction

Indigenizing Poverty Reduction would enhance the BC Poverty Reduction Coalition's work in tackling poverty by bringing the critical issue of indigenous poverty to the forefront and mapping each theme through that lens: what are the specific housing, income, health, education and child care needs and solutions? and what are the legacies of colonization and present experiences of trauma that must be taken into account in shifting the foundation of the Coalition? how can we build on our human rights foundation to honour indigenous rights? Through this project, the Coalition would hire an indigenous youth in a staff leadership role to coordinate the outreach, research and development of the plan. With concrete and extensive support, this person would: engage indigenous organizations and individuals in a collaborative process to determine the vision of the strategy, and short, medium and long-term actions; research indigenizing efforts in the field of poverty reduction across Canada and more broadly; and continue the engagement of indigenous organizations and individuals in the Coalition to shift the perspective of the Coalition and inform our future work. Other staff and members, in particular, the Executive Committee, would go through education and training in meaningful reconciliation and indigenous rights and sovereignty in order to incorporate the issues in the foundation of the Coalition. The provincial government would also be engaged in the outcomes of the project.
$50,000.00
2018

Policy Shift: Getting Beyond Status Quo on Child Poverty in BC

All BC children and youth should have the same opportunities to grow up healthy and achieve their full potential, without the extra challenges created by experiencing poverty and marginalization. In order to scale up the knowledge transfer, engagement and impact of First Call’s advocacy to reduce the incidence and impacts of child poverty, this project will build on the credibility and reach of the annual BC Child Poverty Report Card. Our strategy for scaling up means drilling down to smaller geographic areas, identifying local system change leaders and engaged youth, and empowering their advocacy with tools and training that advance policy and inclusive practices in their communities.
$225,000.00
2018

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