Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Adoptive Families Association of British Columbia

Permanency with an Indigenous Lens – Capacity Building and Collaboration

While Indigenous children remain starkly overrepresented in BC government care and among those waiting for adoption, the world of adoption and permanency is changing to focus on family preservation, the delegation of authority to Indigenous organizations, new forms of permanency, and maintaining cultural identity. However, the need for Indigenous-centred permanency efforts and culturally-appropriate resources to champion the well-being of Indigenous children and families at every step of their journey—before and after they find permanence—is enormous. This project will explore gaps in services and identify actions and collaborations to support Indigenous communities, families, and children.
$20,000.00
2020

Social Innovation Cohort: Adoption Expo

A grant towards participation in a development process to explore the concept of an Adoption Expo and assess the impact of such an event for ourselves and for our prospective partners. Following the development phase we will then have a clearer understanding of the logistics and the outcomes that can drive a decision to hold an Adoption Expo.
$7,500.00
2016

Permanency Project for At Risk Youth

For the first time, AFABC would like to host a 3-day family finding bootcamp for homeless youth, and former youth in care experiencing loneliness. Every child has a family/network, and they can be found. Family Finding Boot Camps are a three day immersion for up to 50 youth and former youth in care learning the philosophy, framework and skills of Family Finding practice. Participants work in small and medium sized teams, actually practicing Family Finding for youth currently homeless, at risk of becoming homeless, or are experiencing loneliness. We would invite lead practitioner Kevin Campbell to host. In his previous bootcamps across the USA participants have successfully completed the Discovery and initial Engagement steps of Family Finding. The goal for the teams by day three of the training is to have found relatives and other connections, identified family members with functional strengths, engaged two lead family members, and invited found adults to a Preparation and Planning Meeting to be held following the bootcamp. Participants leave the immersion experience having learned and practiced the skills of Family Finding, developed a sense of confidence in their use of the skills, and feel confident in their ability to develop a personal support network. Our focus at AFABC includes following up with youth to ensure they are supported as they connect. Partnership opportunities: Broadway Youth Centre, Covenant House, Aunt Leah's, Federation of BC Youth in Care.
$25,000.00
2016

Speak-Out Youth Group

The Speak-Out Youth Group fills a vital gap in existing resources by supporting and encouraging youth in-and-from government care to continue exploring permanency options. This youth led program engages and empowers youth to share their stories, build networks, create resources, gain valuable life skills, advocate for systematic change, and raise awareness about the need for permanent families for all children in government care. The Speak-Out Youth Group is an established program that provides peer support and a vital sense of permanence to its members while facilitating youth participation in community outreach.
$15,000.00
2014

Speak-Out Youth Group

In 2009 AFABC partnered with MCFD to plan and implement a project aimed at increasing the number of permanency plans for youth in government care. The Speak-Out Youth Group evolved from this pilot in recognition of the value that both individual and collective perspectives and experiences played in the successful delivery of the initiative. 15 youth participants expressed an adamant interest in remaining connected to AFABC and the project in order to continue exploring options for permanence and develop more resource materials about teen adoption. The Speak-Out Youth Group is an empowering youth led program with 25 active members and consists of youth-in-care, former youth-in-care, and adoptees aged 13-24 from BC’s Vancouver Coastal and Fraser Regions. By focusing on youth engagement, this program gives a powerful voice to those who have experiences with the foster care system. Monthly meetings also give youth an opportunity to develop transferable life skills by working with career professionals, child and youth care representatives, and clinical counselors.
$20,000.00
2013

Aeriosa Dance Society

BIPOC Operating Grants

In 2020, Vancouver Foundation launched a new granting initiative to offer flexible, general operating grants of up to $50,000 for BIPOC-led organizations in B.C., to support their work in racial equity and racial justice.
$50,000.00
2021

Being - Aeriosa's 10th anniversary performance for the Scotiabank Dance Centre

Aeriosa has been invited to create a site-specific show for the Scotiabank Dance Centre’s 10th anniversary. For four nights, Aeriosa will stage free-admission performances at Granville and Davie of a site-specific dance entitled Being. Act 1 of the show will begin outdoors on Faris Theatre’s roof and north wall, while Act 2 will unfold inside.
$15,000.00
2011

African Stages Association of BC

ON WINGS OF STORIES (OWOS).

On the Wings of Stories (OWOS) is designed to use storytelling and proverbs promote youth-elder interaction and exchange of knowledge and skills. Our goal is to use proverbs to address the problems of youth-adult alienation, mistrust and misunderstanding. We are keenly aware that many elders in our communities live in isolation with insufficient interaction with the youths. Storytelling provides a tool to bridge this inter-generation gap. Our project seeks to use storytelling and other African performing Arts to create and maintain a healthy society and to help empower and deal with challenging issues in the community.
$20,000.00
2018

Afro-Canadian Positive Network of British Columbia

The term is "sociological imagination", NOT "social imagination."

The main goal of the project is to provide mental health prevention and early intervention services to African-Canadians, including those living with HIV in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia. The focus is on the distinct mental health problems facing Black Canadians, which includes a large number of new immigrants and refugees, many of whom are grappling with HIV-related mental health issues. In line with these objectives, principles, and criteria, the project is designed as a multi-pronged, intersectional social and racial justice undertaking that will address mental health issues of Black British Columbians at the individual and community levels.
$20,000.00
2020

Building Social Peace of Mind in Personal Crisis in Black Communities in BC’s Lower Mainland

The main goal of the project is to provide mental health prevention and early intervention services to African-Canadians, including those living with HIV in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia. The focus is on the distinct mental health problems facing Black Canadians, which includes a large number of new immigrants and refugees, many of whom are grappling with HIV-related mental health issues. In line with these objectives, principles, and criteria, the project is designed as a multi-pronged, intersectional social and racial justice undertaking that will address mental health issues of Black British Columbians at the individual and community levels.
$10,000.00
2018

Agrarians Foundation

Accelerating gender parity in financing for small scale food processors

Food security requires that food producers are able to make a living. Food futures analysis shows increasing demand. Small scale food processors create new and innovative products while building relationships with farmers, suppliers, markets and consumers. Women are drawn to this field but as with other women in businesses, they hit barriers finding financing. The importance of their work is not understood by financers which adds to the difficulty. With support from the Vancouver Foundation, financing agencies' representatives will meet with our members. Breakthroughs in understanding will result in plans for new systems and supports thus changing the business ecosystem women ssfp's.
$20,000.00
2019

Ahousaht First Nation

Improving Community Safety & Health by Changing Longstanding Attitudes and Behaviors Related to Dog Care.

Ahousaht is improving public health & safety by innovating animal care & controls. We are developing unique programs to reduce dog bites, dog fights, & other troubling situations that challenge & harm our children, elders & other members. Our project is designed to change the social systems at the root of these safety challenges. We started by establishing an animal bylaw. Step two is an augmented enforcement plan for the bylaw that will shift behaviours & mindsets. This includes new training & education programs, infrastructure including fenced areas, & an Indigenous Culture Trust. Our findings will be shared with communities across BC to improve public safety and the wellbeing of animals.
$298,915.00
2021

Community Safety & Health Compromised by Systemic Dog Overpopulation - Ahousaht

Dogs are dying, our children’s physical and mental wellbeing is at risk, and disease outbreak is threatening the safety of local wildlife. We need to develop a new way to address the systemic issue of dog overpopulation in our remote community to keep residents and visitors safe and healthy, whether they are two legged or four. We live in the village of Maaqtusiis, home to the Ahousaht People, on Flores Island, just 40-minutes by boat from Tofino. Ahousaht First Nation has partnered with CARE Network, a regional non profit animal rescue, to develop and test a new way to humanely manage our largely free-roaming dog population. We look forward to sharing our experience with other communities.
$9,450.00
2019

Alberni Drug and Alcohol Prevention Services Society

The B.R.A.V.E. Project - Boys building Resileincy, Values and Empathy

The BRAVE Project (Build, Resiliency, Values and Empower) is a prevention initiative that builds resiliency and critical thinking skills in youth. The program is a recreation-based, skills development group and weekend prevention outreach for boys aged 12-14. Each series of the BRAVE Project runs six weeks and explores the following topics: Media Messaging and Masculinity, Stress and Coping, Violence, Substance Use, Health Promotion and Personal Challenge/Goal Setting. Each session is two and a half hours and consists of topic discussion and a recreation, skill building or art based activity. By utilizing ADAPS' existing community partnerships, participants experience martial arts, wilderness recreation, bicycle mechanics and community based recreation opportunities through our city parks and recreation. Experiential Learning opportunities such as these are delivered in a way that addresses the four quadrants of resiliency building for youth: Independence, Mastery, Generosity, and Belonging. Strong relationships between youth and a caring adult is key in building resiliency. Outreach services to BRAVE participants and their peers are an important part of this prevention program. The Youth Action Outreach Worker is in the community, building relationships with these youth and supporting prevention initiatives at the Nights Alive Program. The outreach component of BRAVE helps youth to develop relationships to their community supports, and to access healthy activities.
$10,000.00
2015

Alberni-Clayoquot Continuing Care Society

Co-operative Elder Care Initiative

One of the most critical social issues facing Canadians is the nation's rapidly aging demographic and the absence of affordable care for seniors. This project addresses the lack of high quality, affordable and responsive elder care to seniors and their families. Community-based co-operatives are proven to provide care that is more responsive and affordable because they are controlled by users and their families. By utilizing the tools and knowledge developed in this project, care givers and community groups will greatly increase their capacity to provide alternative forms of elder care by replicating community-based, user controlled models piloted in this project. The project also addresses the serious problem of isolation and loneliness faced by a growing number of seniors as well as the lack of support to their caregivers. The project will strengthen social capital in local communities and lessen the isolation of seniors by helping communities to develop co-operative models for the provision of care and the development of social networks for the support of the elderly.
$106,000.00
2012

SENIORS HEALTH INFORMATION PROJECT (SHIP)/ TRAINING THE TRAINER

This project will adapt and deliver four educational workshops for seniors in three key rural/suburban areas on Vancouver Island. Planned and delivered in collaboration with local project partners, the workshops will aid participants in developing skills and strategies to effectively navigate the Home and Community Care System, as they engage with health professionals and support one another in accessing care. Participants will receive a session binder containing information specific to their region and information on provincial services and associations for seniors.
$40,000.00
2011

Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District

Expanding the Influence of Regional Agricultural Support

The ACRD's Systems Change project sets out to test a regional model for food system and agricultural support. Strong regional structures will influence Provincial frameworks and ensure accommodation of the unique contextual realities of BC’s various geographical regions and producer populations. By bridging and supporting local organizations, building a BC-wide network of other regionally-driven organizations, and engaging in targeted education and resource development, we will support change in the way producers, Indigenous stakeholders, and communities are supported within Province-wide agricultural frameworks, ensuring efficacy, long-term sectoral growth, and diverse cultural relevancy.
$300,000.00
2021

Expanding the Influence of Regional Agricultural Support

The ACRD's Systems Change project sets out to develop a model for Regional Agricultural Support that better influences and informs Provincial frameworks, ensuring accommodation of the unique contextual realities of various geographical regions and producer populations. A review of the ACRD’s Agricultural Plan Implementation Project will highlight areas where we’ve succeeded in influencing Provincial systems. Engagement with other communities and research into other models of Regional agricultural support will help to identify shared values and narratives. Discussions with the Province will support renewed and impactful plans for agricultural support within the ACRD and elsewhere.
$20,000.00
2019

A Protocol for Collective Action: Steps towards an Airshed Management Plan for the Alberni Valley

This projects aims to improve air quality in the Alberni Valley. Air pollution is a complex problem that crosses political boundaries and involves everyone. The Alberni Valley is particularly vulnerable to air pollution due to its geography and climate. The Alberni Air Quality Society intends to partner with government bodies, organizations, and the local community to create and formalize a process by which to manage air quality. This will provide an overarching framework to address air pollution in all its forms, whether that be from backyard burning or industrial emissions. This collective action would reduce the human illness and the economic impacts that are associated with air pollut
$10,000.00
2017

Allan Brooks Nature Centre Society

Improving Okanagan Habitat Connectivity "Going from here to there"

Improving Okanagan Habitat Connectivity 'How do we get from here to there' is an educational outreach initiative that will provide the tools to understand and take action on the results and recommendations from the Biodiversity Conservation Strategy project and also to help the general public to understand why connected ecosystems and wildlife habitat corridors are an essential part of maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem services in the Okanagan region. Both the SOSCP and the OCCP are working on a Biodiversity Conservation Strategy for the Okanagan region. The strategy promotes a “big-picture” landscape view of the region and provides a framework for considering conservation options for entire ecosystems and watersheds that go beyond municipal or rural boundaries and includes all land-tenures. The project that we are presenting here forms part of the implementation of the Biodiversity Conservation Strategy.
$20,000.00
2014

Biodiversity Conservation Strategy (BCS) for the Okanagan Basin

To complete a biodiversity conservation strategy for the north and central Okanagan that will identify, preserve and restore important natural areas. It will provide a road map for coordinated efforts to manage land and water of ecological value and provide a template for land use decision-making for public agencies, local governments and conservation groups.
$17,400.00
2010

Alouette Home Start Society

Route 29: The Road Home

Imagine facing the transition from adolescence to adulthood while, at the same time, struggling just to survive because you don’t have a home. The 2011 Homeless Count found 29 homeless youth in Maple Ridge. Over three years, this project will find and improve youth access to housing and build connections and continuing relationships with youth aged 17 to 24. Each youth will be supported in their own unique journey to maturity and to becoming healthy, happy people, with a secure home and the capacity to keep it.
$260,000.00
2011

AMSSA Community Education Society of BC

Unsettling Practice for the Immigration Sector - Development

The transformation of the way in which the Immigration and Settlement Sector is approaching working relationships with Indigenous Peoples will stop the re-creation of historical, systemic patterns between settlers and First Nations. The complexities of a sector that exists to facilitate settlement into territories that are officially acknowledged as 'unceded' are being simplify or ignored in order to achieve fast results, taking us away from the goal of Reconciliation. By identifying and presenting specific and effective elements of disruption to that context, this project will provide viability to a set of general ideas we believe will trigger a process of transformation.
$20,000.00
2019

Amy Ferguson Institute

KHAOS, the opera

KHAOS is a re-imagining of the Greek myth of Demeter and Persephone set in a contemporary world of climate change and looming global catastrophe. KHAOS asks the question, ‘What if Persephone were prevented from returning from the underworld to console her mother? Would Demeter’s continuing grief and despair end life on Earth as we know it?’ This is a request for funding of the premiere production and touring.
$30,000.00
2011

Animals in Science Policy Institute

Replacing animals in secondary school science education

A switch to non-animal methods in education is important for animal welfare, education, and student empowerment. This project aims to understand the cultural shift in secondary teaching required so that non-animal alternatives for dissection are more readily adopted. We plan to: 1) survey BC teachers to assess their perspectives on dissection, and identify obstacles to and opportunities for the adoption of non-animal alternatives; 2) poll the BC public to assess their views on dissection; and 3) hold an expert panel event that will bring together international experts on the issue of non-animal alternatives for dissection to identify novel strategies for creating cultural change in teaching
$10,000.00
2017

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