Awarded Grants

Search or browse below to see past awarded Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Canadian Mental Health Association - BC Division

Social Innovation for Social Inclusion of Vulnerable Populations

Social Innovation for Social Inclusion of Vulnerable Populations
$10,000.00
2014

Developing Socially Inclusive Strategies: Policy Implications of Innovative Community Programming - A Knowledge Exchange Event

$12,782.85
2013

Canadian Mental Health Association - Kelowna & District Branch

Recovery College Development Project

Today, 1 in 5 Canadians experience a mental health problem or illness each year, diminishing quality of life and driving up costs in healthcare and lost productivity. The system is focused downstream on acute care and crisis response. We must broaden our mental health plan to simultaneously seek to promote flourishing mental health while preventing and treating mental illness. The Develop process will move Recovery College from idea to blueprint while creating readiness in partners and community to move upstream to help individuals realize their own abilities, cope with the normal stresses of life, work productively and make a contribution to their community.
$17,450.00
2018

Connected by 25

Connected by 25 is an innovative, cross-sectoral project that addresses the needs of young people between the ages of 16 and 24 in the Central Okanagan vulnerable in their transition to adulthood. Feedback from young people and community stakeholders identified both the need and rationale for the project, and a CAI service innovation grant allowed a two year pilot of Connected by 25 to start in early 2012. The project builds capacity within the community to ensure that young people at risk of falling through the cracks in their transition to adulthood have access to the services they require. It further serves to build capacity in youth themselves by offering the relational, emotional, and material supports they need. The project incorporates a dedicated part-time community capacity coordinator, who works with community based organizations to enhance collaboration, and identify and address systemic barriers. Concurrently, a full-time youth navigator provides directs supports and assistance to navigate complex systems, build connections and achieve success in their lives.
$80,000.00
2012

Meals Matter

Meals Matter - to provide low income individuals with the means to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Also supports low-intensity part-time staffing positions to people living with mental illness.
$90,000.00
2010

Canadian Mental Health Association - Port Alberni Branch

Healthy Harvest

Healthy Harvest Market Garden began four years ago with the idea of providing gardening skills and healthy food in a therapeutic environment for people with mental health issues. People were provided with a small honorarium for 10 hours of work per month. Since that time we have been able to get a long term lease on acreage and a greenhouse owned by the Hupacasath First Nations. The local food movement has been growing throughout BC and great opportunities exist in Port Alberni of which this project can take advantage. There is a great demand for local produce from restaurants in the Tofino-Ucluelet area and Port Alberni is the closest farming community. The Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District has a 20 year Agricultural Plan to achieve 40% food self-sufficiency. The ARCD recently hired an Agricultural Support Worker. There are two Farmer's Markets in operation in Port Alberni. We have experimented with different crops and methods of sales and are now ready to move into full production with the idea of becoming a self-sustaining social enterprise.
$33,000.00
2014

Canadian Mental Health Association - Prince George Branch

Connecting a Community Through Food - Quesnel

Quesnel is a community in transition, with significant economic downturn and increasing poverty, corresponding with high food insecurity risk and community division. We aim to increase access to nutritious food to all residents while encouraging community connection and collaboration by creating a centre for food redistribution and programming. We will encourage the sharing of resources and knowledge amongst community members and organizations. All programming will be focused on empowering choice, reinstating dignity, engaging the population and minimizing shame and stigma. It is our goal to encourage community engagement and collaboration while coming together around food.
$300,000.00
2021

Expanding Employment - Year 2 and 3

The Expanding Employment project provides increased paid work experience and on the job site training to individuals who live with mental illness and substance use issues. Employees will have the opportunity to be trained by a professional chef in a catering business or work alongside an established crew on trail/yard maintenance, snow removal, gutter cleaning and small home repair jobs. These employment opportunities are in response to clients' requests to have "real jobs" and provide supportive work experience to assist in transitioning to community based employment. All prospective employees are matched with a support worker who will provide one on one vocational assistance and all will work on a team with a supportive trainer/leader who is in recovery. CMHA expects that some individuals will graduate to part or full time community based employment and all will benefit from increased independence and financial security which would lead to greater health outcomes.
$150,000.00
2012

Expanding Employment

The Expanding Employment project provides increased paid work experience and on the job site training to individuals who live with mental illness and substance use issues. Employees will have the opportunity to be trained by a professional chef in a catering business or work alongside an established crew on trail/yard maintenance, snow removal, gutter cleaning and small home repair jobs. These employment opportunities are in response to clients' requests to have "real jobs" and provide supportive work experience to assist in transitioning to community based employment. All prospective employees are matched with a support worker who will provide one on one vocational assistance and all will work on a team with a supportive trainer/leader who is in recovery. CMHA expects that some individuals will graduate to part or full time community based employment and all will benefit from increased independence and financial security which would lead to greater health outcomes.
$137,612.00
2011

Canadian Mental Health Association - Vancouver-Fraser Branch

Spiritual communities collaborate to engage mental health recovery

Spiritual communities offer support, meaningful values and practices to help with everyday life. Individuals with mental illness may, before anything else, seek help from their spiritual community. But their cry for help is not always met with understanding. Focus groups alerted Sanctuary that individuals with mental illness may be excluded from their spiritual communities' support network. While education on mental health is welcomed, the difficult task lies in leading communities through a process of action toward attitudinal change. In this project we aim to address barriers for inclusion and build support for individuals with mental illness in spiritual communities. We will coach action groups (peers, careers and leaders) within spiritual communities to bring issues into the open and garner support for individuals with mental illness. In order to engage a wider range of spiritual communities, we will partner with an interfaith network. Individuals from diverse spiritual backgrounds will be trained to work within their communities to build support for mental health recovery.
$64,000.00
2013

Social Enterprise Services

Social Enterprise Services
$32,000.00
2011

Green Dry Cleaning Social Enterprise for Mental Health Consumers

Green Dry Cleaning Social Enterprise for Mental Health Consumers
$30,000.00
2010

Canadian Mental Health Association - Vernon & District Branch

Suicide Prevention Strategy

Suicide is the leading cause of injury-related death among children and youth in BC, with the Interior having the highest rate of suicide in the province. Reducing and preventing youth suicide by systems change will empower youth, parents, caregivers, teachers, community leaders to take purposeful action with an evidence-based approach to ensure a safe, supportive community for our youth. The inclusion of rural and Indigenous youth, LGBTQ+ youth, parents, community arts and recreational youth leaders to join with our existing partners will help ensure an inclusive, culturally informed development process.
$16,506.00
2020

Canadian Music Centre

CMC BC Decolonization & Reconciliation Project

3 years ago we began a land acknowledgement at start of concerts. We then made protocol visits to 3 First Nations on whose land we operate & held discussions with them. But those actions didn't lead to anything lasting & doing more was beyond our capacity-already stretched delivering our mission. This project will make it possible for us to play a lead role in a system-wide process of reconciliation, leading to a multi-year Indigenous-led action plan we hope the entire new music community can adopt and work to implement fostering meaningful Indigenous participation & engagement to help overcome painful legacy of negation. The entire budget is solely to fund Indigenous participation & travel
$18,000.00
2020

CMC-BC Composer Mentorship Program

Canadian Music Centre’s BC Associate Composers will take part in mentorship outreach program serving both schools and emerging composers across BC. This project encourages music students and faculty to collaborate with the creative writing, drama, dance and math departments. CMC senior composers will also work closely with emerging composers to support their creative endeavors.
$60,000.00
2011

Canadian National Institute for the Blind

Transition Peer Support Group for Young Adults in BC with Vision Loss

There is a lack of skills training and support for Canadians who are blind or partially sighted and the result is that 65 percent of working age adults with vision loss are unemployed and 50 percent earn less than $20,000 per year. CNIB's innovative Transition Peer Support Group for Young Adults in BC with Vision Loss will support young adults at this critical stage in their lives and prepare them with the skills and confidence they need to earn a living and maintain a job. Through interaction with others experiencing the same struggles and situations this pilot project will building acceptance of vision loss through the discovery of adaptive methods, accessibility options, independent living skills and practical skills such as interview techniques and resume writing. These groups will empower young adults with vision loss by arming them with essential tools and skills. Together, participants will explore and discuss topics related to education, transitioning into the working world, assistive technology to achieve independence, social interaction, family life and more.
$90,000.00
2014

Ensuring Accessibility for British Columbians with Vision Loss

Canada is a prosperous and technologically advanced society yet many Canadians with vision loss are excluded from social and economic opportunities. The lack of skills training and support results in 65% unemployment of working age adults with vision loss and 50% earning less than $20,000 annually. The harsh reality is only 45% of blind or partially sighted Canadian children graduate high school compared to 90% of sighted kids. To tackle these challenges, CNIB Specialists train those with vision loss to access information using assistive devices. These devices coupled with the skills taught by CNIB Specialists increases self-reliance, personal capacity and the ability to be productive, contributing community members. Our project, Ensuring Accessibility for British Columbians with Vision Loss, ensures no one in our province with vision loss is denied the fundamental right to access information. With your support we will expand our stock of assistive devices to eliminate our wait list and meet the increasing demand for vision rehabilitation services and equipment in British Columbia.
$20,000.00
2014

Canadian Nurses Foundation

BC Indigenous Community Based Mentorship Program Supporting Indigenous Nurses for Success

Indigenous Peoples are committed to advancing the health and wellness of communities. Given the current health care crisis, the numbers and retention of Indigenous nurses must increase to provide needed culturally safe care. A BC Indigenous community based mentorship program proposes strategies to ensure success of Indigenous nursing students and retention of employed Indigenous nurses. Partnerships with Indigenous community leaders and organizations, and BC schools of nursing will build on a community needs based framework. Ensuring Indigenous peoples are fully represented in healthcare roles, has far-reaching implications for the health of Indigenous individuals and communities.
$10,000.00
2017

Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society

Changing the face of conservation

Conservation is based on a colonial model that has a long history of contributing to systemic oppression, devaluing non-white worldviews, and Indigenous erasure. Governments would move people off land, violate their title and rights, and designate the area a park or protected area. Not surprisingly then, land and ocean conservation movements, and the people that work in conservation, are predominantly white and middle class. Meanwhile, marginalized communities are often the most affected by changes in climate or the environment, and today’s youth will bear the long-term burden of our current choices. As part of our ongoing work to both decolonize our organization – and influence decolonization in the movement – and to create more spaces for marginalized voices in decision making processes, we would like to more proactively challenge the status quo. While we do more decolonization, anti-oppression and diversity, equity and inclusion work with our staff and board, we would also like to create two new roles on our staff team for young Indigenous youth and folks of colour. The goal would be to have them work directly within our program teams and be fully engaged in decision making, policy development (both at an organizational level and a government level), and all aspects of programming. They will be mentored by staff at the organization to develop strong skills, while having space to shape conservation plans with their own knowledge and experience.
$50,000.00
2018

Decolonizing conservation and testing new models

Conservation is associated with creating parks and saving wildlife from extinction. But it also has a long history of fuelling violent, genocidal policies like forcibly removing Indigenous peoples from their lands, violating their title and rights, and impeding Indigenous connections to their territories and traditions. With colonial governments reluctant to relinquish control over natural resources, organizations like CPAWS have an obligation to advance decolonial conservation models. Institutional racism harms people and the environment, and systemic change in conservation is essential to address centuries of colonial oppression while healing our relationships to the land and each other.
$245,000.00
2018

Redefining Get Outside BC (RGOBC)

RGOBC will change the way we act, what we believe and potentially the resources that flow to youth-centered programing. First, CPAWS-BC will accept that our current model of hosting a single summit in the Lower Mainland as the primary tool for youth engagement and leadership training is flawed. Instead, with the Vancouver Foundation’s support, we will host a four-day youth summit in Central Vancouver Island, the Okanagan, and the Kootenays, as well as focus and planning groups in various regions. To date, most youth programs are devised in Vancouver and implemented elsewhere. RGOBC will be devised and implemented locally, leaving space for the influence and sharing of ideas from other regions, ensuring a wider range of voices and experience are incorporated. Youth and a diverse group of educators, leaders and social innovators will collaborate in the program with the intention of critiquing, deconstructing and rebuilding the structure and approach. Youth will lead all aspects of the process. Non-youth participants, including potential corporate funders, will be engaged in the program, but will take guidance from youth throughout. It will help create “buy-in” for the concept and program, since adults will be part of the larger systemic change and will be asked to be a part of the long-term funding plan. The final program outcomes will be shared with the broader environmental community in an effort to change the wider movement. CPAWS-BC will demonstrate that change is possible
$9,000.00
2016

Get Outside BC 2017 – Fostering Change Edition

CPAWS-BC believes that in order to ensure conservation is a long-term priority, we need to equip the next generation of youth to feel safe exploring nature; to defend socially, culturally and biologically important spaces; and to lead their peers along a similar journey. We also need to ensure that all youth have these skills and experiences, and not just a privileged few. Get Outside BC (GOBC) is a longer term youth-led leadership program that supports young people gain the mental and physical health benefits of being in wilderness, while also being a leader in a larger social and environmental change movement. After speaking with young people and social service organizations, we learned that youth in care were craving the opportunities that GOBC offered but faced many barriers to participation. For example, some programs were prohibitively expensive for youth, or social service organizations didn’t have the capacity to start these programs on top of their regular programming. CPAWS-BC will work with youth in care, youth agencies and other experts to redesign GOBC specifically to meet the needs of youth in care. In doing so, we will amplify youth voice and engage young people and youth-serving orgs in creating a program formula that ensures full access and participation. Our longer-term goal is to demonstrate our outcomes for the larger community in order to make more inclusive and accessible spaces.
$25,000.00
2016

Canadian Public Health Association

Building a BC Coalition for Healthy School Food

Canada is the only G7 nation without a school food program; however, demand is growing for healthy, education-based school food programs that improve the health of children and youth. This project builds on grassroots efforts in BC to organize around school food. A BC Chapter of the Coalition for Healthy School Food will support national work to secure public investment in a cost-shared, universal school food program. The BC-CHSF will unite diverse stakeholders from across BC, including those from education, health and agriculture sectors, to collaborate on advocacy and develop a provincial plan for how BC would utilize funds and build on existing programs across the province.
$20,000.00
2019

Canadian Society for Social Development

Internet Business Development for Entrepreneurs (IBDE)

IBDE is an online, accredited training program that helps persons with disabilities (PWD) become web designers or establish a business website. Curriculum is accessed from www.ibde.ca, allowing participants to learn comfortably from home. Participants receive one-on-one assistance from qualified, caring personnel who understand the challenges they face. Assistance is offered in our virtual classroom and through instant messaging, email, and telephone. We offer two IBDE programs: (1) IBDE Web Essentials, a six-month introductory web design program, and (2) IBDE Web Advanced, a four-month program offering training in web programming and web marketing. Through this project we plan to provide supports to 17 individuals in total, eleven in IBDE Web Advanced and six in IBDE Web Essentials. This project will increase employment for PWD by equipping them with technical skills and experience that are in high demand by employers and the business community.
$40,000.00
2011

Canadian Society Promoting Environmental Conservation (SPEC)

Ecosystem Services on Metro Vancouver Farmland

Do you value biodiversity, beautiful landscapes, and access to healthy, local food? In many cases these things are brought to you farmland. However because these things are not valued by our economic system, they are vulnerable to being exploited. We at SPEC aim to change that. We are working with local farmers to sustainably manage things like soil fertility, water consumption, biodiversity and pest management. We are also trying out a project to compensate farmers for creating pollinator habitat. We are starting an information campaign to increase awareness for the value of farmland, and maybe will campaign local government to compensate farmers for environmentally friendly practices.
$30,000.00
2018

Pages