Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Arnica Artist Run Centre Society

Arena

'Arena' is an innovative project that will draw together artists in dialogue and collaboration as they explore two homegrown Kamloops sports phenomena: ice fishing and skater culture. The project will encompass two exhibitions by artists working with site specific installation and photography. The project will engage local artists through mentoring opportunities, artist talks and workshops. A catalogue documenting the project will be published. The 'Arena' project covers two distinct exhibitions, linked under one overarching project that explores the intersections between sport, youth culture, and contemporary art. "Hard Water" will illuminate the culture of ice fishing through the highly evocative photographs of emerging Kamloops artist Devon Lindsay and the chilling ice cave installation of Josh Cleminson and Monte Burman. Steve deBruyn's installation, "Skater!" will explore the aesthetic and functional qualities of DIY built objects associated with skater culture through a fusion of functional skate-park architecture with formal sculptural and painted explorations.
$7,000.00
2013

Art Starts in Schools Society

Art is essential - not extra

There is tremendous opportunity for artists and teachers to collaborate as partners in education and explore arts integration in classrooms. Our project seeks to increase the employability of artists in schools. Infusion offers training for artists to develop a complementary teaching practice, woven into their robust artistry. Teaching artists have greater opportunities to work in schools as they can speak the language of education. Infusion provides educators with professional development to expand their understanding of art in education. Our project seeks to change: - Basic routines: Artists interested in working in schools need support as navigating school culture can be intimidating and even prohibitive. Teachers teach the way they teach and need a compelling reason to explore new approaches like arts integration. - Resources: The role of artists in schools needs to be expanded in order to re-establish the flow of resources. - Beliefs: Young people are taught that art is separate from the rigor of ‘academic’ subjects. Since 2012, we have supported 97 artists to become teaching artists. This grant will help us launch the next phase, which is to deploy resources to the following: mentorship, marketing systems, advocacy and evaluation. This next phase will help us examine whether the role of art is actually expanding in the education system, and inevitably our community, and if the perception of how young people are taught to perceive art is actually changing.
$225,000.00
2017

YoungStarters

YoungStarters is a free arts mentorship program provided by ArtStarts that invites teens to take the lead in arts based community projects. The program is designed for creative-minded, ambitious young people. For five weeks in Summer 2015, the group will meet every Sunday at the ArtStarts LAB. Partnered with mentors who range from professional artists, arts administrators and community organizers, young people participate in workshops as they individually develop their own art project ideas. Each individual project will be given a $500 budget and space to explore ideas through a process based, arts integrated approach. By providing young people with the right tools, support and knowledge, YoungStarters activates young people's creativities while providing them with lasting, relevant skills and experiences. By focusing on community based projects, YoungStarters aims to engage the community through youth-led collaborations exploring diverse art forms.
$15,000.00
2014

Arthritis Research Canada (ARC)

"It IS About Us". a reference manual for patients participating in health research.

Patient engagement in research occurs when patients meaningfully collaborate in the research process, taking an active role from the start in advising on a research project, project design or carrying out the research. This is important as it contributes greatly to research relevancy, credibility and accountability - issues important to patients. We propose to develop a comprehensive, user friendly manual “It IS About Us" based on over a decade of experience of ARC's Arthritis Patient Advisory Board (APAB). The Board is a diverse group of arthritis patients who have ample expertise with all aspects of arthritis research. In leveraging the knowledge and experience of their involvement in the research process, the manual will support growth and sustainability of infrastructure that will optimize patient engagement in health research. ARC has a strong history of involving patients and is believed to be one of the few research centres in the world that maintains a Patient Advisory Board to promote consumer involvement in research and knowledge translation activities. We will conduct a comprehensive and inclusive study to include all aspects of the patient concerns from their point of view to build capacity for consumer participation in research decision-making and knowledge translation activities through training and provision of ongoing education to new consumer collaborations. Currently, no standard published protocols written by patients for patients are available.
$10,000.00
2015

Arts BC

The #Next40: New Voices and Fresh Thinking. Redesigning Arts BC’s Role in Addressing Systemic Barriers to Change in BC's Community Arts and Culture Landscape

To support a full creative life for all, Arts BC commits to addressing barriers to change in our sector and championing practices of culture equity that empower just, inclusive, and equitable communities and learning environments for sector development. We strongly believe that through accessible professional development, knowledge-sharing and peer exchange our next generation of arts and cultural leaders will emerge in our province that will effect change in culture-led community development across BC. Our VF funded Develop Grant will explore ways to overcome deeply rooted issues in the sector through peer-based cultural equity practices and dialogue.
$10,000.00
2019

Arts in Action Society

Squamish Artist Solidarity Housing Initiative

The Solidarity Housing project aims to support the transfer of privately owned homes to permanently affordable housing for Squamish artists and cultural producers in Vancouver. The first stage of this project will engage homeowners through a survey and focus groups to explore ways that non-Indigenous people can leverage the land they own as part of the process of reconciliation: how can settlers live a good life while contributing to permanently affordable housing for Indigenous people? As well, Squamish artists will come together to discuss their needs and desires for housing: what does safe, affordable, culturally appropriate housing look like for Squamish artists and cultural producers?
$20,000.00
2019

Groundswell Grow

Currently, we are working with our alumni and community partners to plan and design Groundswell Grow. We will launch Groundswell Grow with a weekly marketplace on Granville Island in summer 2017. It will provide living inspiration for how to do business that benefits community, and give young ventures access to market, real estate, and an extended community support network. Advanced programs will include mentoring and market stand training, and support services for the early stage social venture community with the help of our community partners. As successful young entrepreneurs “graduate” out of the marketplace incubator stage they will populate the city with social businesses that work for communities and become mentors for new Groundswell Grow participants. The ecosystem will expand to include other local, young, social ventures who get access to the marketplace and a supportive network of training, mentoring and venture services. The marketplace setting will increase opportunities for public outreach and education around community based ventures and social entrepreneurship. This model will change the flow of resources through the business system: more small scale, unlikely entrepreneurs will have the knowledge and access to financial and social support to be able to create successful social ventures that provide them with meaningful employment. And, more businesses will exist that add social and environmental value to communities, not just monetary value.
$150,000.00
2017

19th Birthday Party Exhibition Tour

To plan, facilate, and curate an exhibition tour of the 19th Birthday Party, an interactive media installation that serves as a central provocative agent for public dialogue and education surrounding issues relating to youth in government care. The tour will work with between 4 to 7 host organizations in municipalities across the lower mainland, including: Aunt Leah’s Society in New Westminster, Lu’Ma Native Housing Society in East Vancouver, and community organizations and partners in Surrey, Burnaby, North Vancouver and Abbotsford. Co-directors of Housing Matters Media Porject will work closely with partnering host organizations in each municipality to create an art engagement and/or social event that accompanies the installation to further encourage community dialogue.
$52,385.00
2016

We Are Everywhere

We Are Everywhere is a community engaged art project led by artists Corin Browne and Patti Fraser, advocate and project coordinator Violet Rose Pharoah and communication professionals to mentor a small group of youth with lived foster care experience to collaboratively create a high-quality book, featuring interviews, stories and photographs of community members from across the lower mainland who are former youth in care, exploring their daily lives and sharing what has helped them survive and thrive. The project will include a post-project evaluation process with research and planing for longterm distribution of the book, including the potential social enterprise development with youth participants The mainstream narrative associated with foster care is a negative, recycled story that speaks about the issue without the actual voice of those with lived experience. The foster care population carries the social stigma of “failure” and even those closest to them usually have very little expectations for their futures. While crucial to acknowledge the realities that individuals from foster care face, many are carving out lives defined by their own personal definition of success; quietly creating new narratives that defy the preconceived notions about life after foster care. These stories deserve the opportunity to be shared and have the potential to inspire youth aging out of the system, as well as shift the current perpetuated narrative.
$50,000.00
2016

Oh the Places You Should Know: A Squamish Place Names Curriculum

The “Oh the Places You Should Know” curriculum project aims to create a foundation for the development of learning materials to accompany the Sk_wx_wu´7mesh Place Names map that are tailored to the needs of individual School Districts situated on Sk_wx_wu´7mesh territory (Vancouver, Burnaby, North Vancouver, West Vancouver, Squamish, and Whistler). The project will include focus groups with teachers in order to understand their needs, collaboration with Sk_wx_wu´7mesh knowledge keepers to collect stories and information to be used in the materials, and the creation of sample materials to be piloted in select School Districts. These materials have the potential to change how those living on Sk_wx_wu´7mesh territory understand and interact with Sk_wx_wu´7mesh peoples and places. By using these materials, students and teachers can begin to break down the cycle of racism that our education system has historically perpetuated. Awareness is the first step towards change. The materials will afford a deeper understanding of the culture and current issues of the Sk_wx_wu´7mesh peoples, and a greater appreciation of the natural history of the places students and teachers visit every day. With support from Vancouver Foundation, we will be able to develop test materials to pilot in several schools, and gather the feedback required to create inspiring curriculum kits that will change how those on Sk_wx_wu´7mesh territory learn about Sk_wx_wu´7mesh histories and peoples.
$10,000.00
2016

Groundswell: Grassroots Economic Alternatives

Groundswell is an eight-month training school for people under the age 35 to develop the skills to build sustainable enterprises, including but not limited to co-ops, self-employment, social businesses, collectives, non-profits and other grassroots economic configurations. We actively target low-moderate income and immigrant youth, primarily from the Eastside of Vancouver and suburban areas, particularly Surrey. We will expand over the next 3-5 years to serve 70 participants annually, which given the very significant interest seems entirely reasonable. Critically, our vision for Groundswell is to work with all graduates on a long-term basis to establish a lasting supportive network of community enterprises. This vision is not possible on our own, and thus we have been expending a huge amount of effort to collaborate with local community groups and other organizations working towards a new economy. We were met with an overwhelming response when we first opened for applications in Spring 2013 and already have a huge amount of interest with a swiftly-growing applicant list for 2014.
$200,000.00
2014

Enterprising Youth

Through this project we will utilize a small cohort of youth to demonstrate their potential for independence and the existing capacity within youth exiting care to participate in, and eventually manage, visible mainstream spaces in Vancouver - spaces such as business, alternate and post secondary education, and community discussions of social issues affecting youth directly. This will be done by recruiting 4-6 young people between 17-24 who have experienced government care to participate in the Groundswell Business Alternatives Program. Through the program, youth will develop a project (ex. a socially-conscious small business, branded product, a non-profit or campaign) which at the end of the program will be presented as a Gala comprised of potential funders, community advocates, alumni and financial mentors. After the Gala, youth will use the mentors, alumni, and staff to carry out their project in the chosen community. The youth will be supported to find a project that will succeed, and will be supported by a wraparound community committed to their success in their chosen venture.
$30,000.00
2014

The Housing Matters Media Project - The Renovation working title

The Arts in Action Society in partnership with the Housing Matters Media Project is seeking funds in order to further our ongoing work in building and sustaining informed networks of youth and concerned adults who are involved in seeking solutions to issues relating to affordable housing for youth, particularly for former youth in care. This community engaged media art project will increase the community's ability to voice its own ideas and seek its own solutions in ways in which the public parent can support youth to successfully transition out of care into the community. This project will continue to educate members of the community on the particular issues youth in care face as they transition to adulthood. This project will create opportunities for mentorship, learning, and employment for participating youth. And it intends to create new knowledge to aid in ways in which adults can involve themselves in the role of the public parent.
$50,000.00
2014

Purple Thistle Centre

The Purple Thistle has been operating for twelve years on the Eastside of Vancouver, running a 2500 sq/ft youth community centre that offers a plethora of free art and culture resources and support for 150-200 regular low-income youth participants. Our mission of youth empowerment and liberation is realized by the centre being run by a youth staff collective of 15-25 individuals who, in collaboration with the Directors, set policy, establish budgets, staff the facility and make all programming decisions. Central to our mandate of youth liberation and empowerment is providing specific leadership training in the context of real world decisions, real budgets and actual programming.
$30,000.00
2013

Youth Care Media Project (WORKING TITLE ONLY)

This digital storytelling project will work with a group of youth and youth technical mentors to create a series of digital stories. The themes of this project will centre around the participant's response to the lack of support for youth in government care as they reach adulthood. This project will mentor the youth in community engaged digital video production skills with the intention of inviting the participants to create stories that relate to the project's inquiry. This work is intended to challenge and question the current mainstream narrative on homelessness and youth. This project seeks to create venues and opportunities for youth from diverse backgrounds to question, respond, and provoke a greater public awareness of the issues facing youth and housing issues. Community video is created through collaboration with skilled artists and and sees production values as an inherent part of the process. The project will create these digital stories in a series of workshops. We are committed to a collaborative, respectful, and democratic working environment
$20,000.00
2013

Groundswell: Grassroots Economic Alternatives

Our proposal comes in two parts: first a training institute where young people (up to age 35) can come together for a year's intensive program to imagine, design and build new enterprises including cooperatives, collectives, non-profits, arts and artisanal enterprises, self-employment scenarios and other grassroots configurations: all explicitly contributing to a community economic fabric of reciprocity. Each program will run for ten months: 4 months of intensive work, a month of strategizing and proposal planning, then 5 months of supported project development. Participants will develop the comprehensive skills - individually and collectively needed to run their own enterprises. The second piece is that we will link graduates and their new initiatives into a network of mutual aid and support. Each graduating participant and enterprise will be a member of the Groundswell Co-op relying on and supporting one another, and being supported by the collective institutional, organizational and financial resources. Ongoing reciprocity and interconnectedness is the key to our proposal.
$70,000.00
2012

Arts Umbrella Association

Arts Umbrella Surrey Outreach

In the past year, Arts Umbrella has focused on preparing for the launch of two facilities in Surrey; one in the South (primarily tuition based) and one in Surrey Centre (primarily free-of-charge). In Fall 2012, we will begin the delivery of our free-of-charge Surrey Outreach programs from our Surrey Centre facility, firmly establishing Arts Umbrella as a permanent presence and stable support organization for at-risk children in the Surrey Centre area. Arts Umbrella will provide arts workshops that are sensitive to the needs of Surrey’s diverse child population, with a particular focus on supporting children facing unique settlement challenges in their new Canadian home. Arts outreach programs will run both after school and over spring break. With the activation of this free-of-charge programming through a new permanent Surrey Centre facility, we will be able to forge new connections and establish meaningful relationships with Surrey families, schools and other community organizations, and thereby further increase access to supportive services for vulnerable Surrey children.
$60,000.00
2012

Ashoka Canada

Changemaker Showcase and Challenge

Ashoka Canada will collaborate with colleges and universities to organize a series of Changemaker Showcases that will connect students to local innovators and opportunities for changemaking. Each showcase features a main speaker, two youth-led projects, an open mic session for students to share current projects, followed by an informal networking session. Ashoka Canada will record each 10-minute talk and showcase them on its website as free resources that can benefit other social innovation educators. Our partner schools in BC will take turns hosting and organizing each of the showcases, which are open to the public. In conjunction with this series, we invite all students who are inspired to take part in a daylong social innovation bootcamp and launch a project as part of our Changemaker Challenge. Educators from Ashoka's partner schools will co-design the bootcamp ahead of time at a special educators summit and then co-facilitate the bootcamp as well as guide participants through the challenge. Qualifying teams will be able to receive funding to start their projects.
$77,000.00
2013

Changemakers Competition on First Nations, Metis and Inuit Education

Changemakers is a community of action where individuals around the world collaborate on solutions to solve the world’s most pressing social problems. Our online platform brings together 130,000 contributors from around the globe. Participants submit ideas, collectively identify the best social solutions, and then collaborate to refine, enrich, and implement those solutions. With the McConnell Foundation, we identified a Changemakers competition as a way to find innovations in the field of education, as well as to make meaningful connections between grassroots innovators and the philanthropic sector in Canada. Ashoka Canada is launching reRooting Education: Inspired Approaches to First Nations, Métis and Inuit Learning. We are looking to find, map and generate innovative ideas and strategies to improve First Nations, Métis and Inuit students’ engagement and success in education. Top entries will be recognized with prizes, which will be awarded at a closing summit. Additional prizes will acknowledge outstanding entries from specific geographic regions or thematic topics.
$50,000.00
2011

Association of Neighbourhood Houses of British Columbia

New Neighbors Project - Newcomer Youth for Real Representation

This project will invite and support newcomer youth in exploring ideas and strategies that will amplify their voices, ideas, thoughts, and lived experiences in decision-making spaces in which they are currently entirely excluded from or are underrepresented. We will convene immigrant and refugee youth, along with staff and board members of the Association of Neighbourhood Houses of BC, in co-creation style facilitated dialogues that draw out, identify, and document the most effective and sustainable strategies and structures in order to have newcomer youth's voices captured at the board, governance, and decision-making level at ANHBC's neighbourhood houses. As neighbourhood houses are an important resource to newcomer youth, it is vital that newcomer youth are involved with the neighbourhood house's decision-making on community issues, which directly affect the livelihood of newcomer youth, their peers, and their families. MPNH's Newcomer Youth Leadership Group, along with our newcomer youth groups at fellow neighbourhood houses, will meet to form a city-wide Newcomer Youth Committee to design, implement and evaluate the project from beginning to end. Newcomer youth will meet, highlight key areas of exploration, and facilitate dialogue workshops. The results will be compiled by newcomer youth and the recommendations, strategies and best practices will be presented to ANHBC staff and Board of Directors with the goal of increasing genuine representation in decision-making
$10,000.00
2018

Resurfacing History: Land and Lives in Mount Pleasant

Resurfacing History addresses the barriers that keep urban Indigenous families from practicing land based cultural practices in the city. The project focuses on developing a community process for promoting understanding between cultural value systems and to build capacity for Indigenous people to be part of a mechanism that preserves culture, explores cultural knowledge and integrates actionable steps that can make social ecosystems and infrastructure work for urban Indigenous people. Our vision is that we will strengthen connections & leverage partnerships to ensure Indigenous people lead land based work & that they will be called upon to provide the expertise to community organizations.
$180,000.00
2018

A Reggio Emilia-Inspired Early Learning Centre for BC

Our project is to create a Reggio-based Learning Centre at Frog Hollow that will train and support child care centres and school teachers across BC to implement the Reggio Emilia approach. Activities will include tours of our childcare programs, introductory presentations on the Reggio approach, the production of a practice-based training video, both customized and general workshop presentations, consulting services for centres and teachers, web-based promotion of the Reggio approach and our services, and support for networking and mutual support between centres implementing the Reggio approach. We will begin by focusing on Metro Vancouver and eventually offer training and consultation across the province. There are 102,908 child care spaces in BC for ages 0-12, which is approximately 20% of the total number of children. Our goal is to make the Reggio Emilia approach available to as many of the child care centres as possible. Scaling out the Reggio Emilia approach to centres across BC will result in increased school readiness along the EDI vulnerability areas, a closer alignment with the BC Early Learning Framework, and assist with the transition of children to the school system as the Reggio Emilia approach is both consistent with and complimentary to BC's New Curriculum. We anticipate a change in the early learning system in both the routines and beliefs of the system. The Learning Centre will become a social enterprise and will eventually become self-sustaining.
$10,000.00
2017

Resurfacing History: Land and Lives in Mount Pleasant

Resurfacing History addresses how living in urban centred affects the cultural continuity for Aboriginal people and explores how to build resilience to increase social connection and belonging. The project focuses on developing a community process for promoting understanding between cultural value systems, and to build capacity for Aboriginal people to be part of a mechanism that preserves culture, explores knowledge and integrates actionable steps that can make social ecosystems and infrastructure work for urban communities. Creating onversations focused on land use from Aboriginal worldview & shared pathways are critical for nurturing solidarity & connection.
$10,000.00
2017

West End Community Food Centre

Over a third of people in the West End of Vancouver live on a low and inadequate income and are food insecure. Historically society has responded to hunger (food insecurity) with charity, even though we know that quick fixes do not change the circumstances for people who are living in poverty. Gordon Neighbourhood House is working with partners to shift the conversation and action towards justice and away from charity. As a community, we have the power to spark long lasting changes, whether within our community or at a policy level, that ensure everyone’s right to good food by eliminating poverty. We do this work by bringing people together through food programs, dialogues, and training.
$150,000.00
2017

Sharing Homes and Lives; Aging, Affordability, and Happiness

Our project involves: 1. Convening seniors and their families, young people and youth leaving care, and other potential stakeholders, in order to understand their very diverse contexts and to begin (a) articulating a value-base and vision that will ground how shared lives models are to be conceived and supported, (b) imagining and co-designing variants to life-sharing models that would fit individual's own, diverse circumstances, (c) beta-testing things like risk-sharing agreements, matchmaking/meetup formats and events, new screening and monitoring frameworks, and so on. 2. Investigating match-making services and algorithms to prototype more effective matching tools than conventional application and assessment processes 3. Designing the right infrastructure/container that will support these activities, including the roles, policies, practices and technology components. 4. Investigating the power of peer-to-peer models like Air BnB and Uber in order to see how these sorts of emerging solutions might apply or be adapted to our context, Through these sorts of activities, we (1) change the ownership of the model and begin to build participation in a movement (2) create an opportunity to build a new discourse around risk that we jointly share and mitigate, (3) create diverse solutions and models; (4) establish policy and infrastructure AFTER we know what works, versus services patterned after existing policies and system cultures.
$131,000.00
2016

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