Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

UBC - Office of Research Services

The Youth Injection Prevention YIP Project (Dr. Jane Buxton)

This project will disseminate the results of ten focus groups (FGs) and fifteen interviews with 60 street-involved youth aged 15-24 years in Metro Vancouver region, Nov 2009-March 2010. The FGs/interviews explored resiliency factors from the youth’s perspective, services available to reduce harms from drug use and perceived barriers to accessing these services. A team of 6 youth participated as co-researchers providing input into script design, co-facilitating FGs, performing data analysis and presenting at National conferences and local partnership meetings. These youth will continue to be involved in this project 1) Conduct 5 interactive community workshops (one in each health authority) to present the findings of the previous study to the local youth. These workshops will be led by one member of the YIP youth team, a research coordinator and a local youth from the respective health authority. 2) Feedback from youth participants at the workshops will be used to compare/contrast issues and experiences of local youth in their communities with those identified by Metro-Vancouver youth. 3) Create a DVD showing the process of youth engagement and empowerment. 4) Create a website, on-line forum and face book. 5) Produce a community friendly summary report and fact sheet re findings in Metro Vancouver and similarities and differences in other regions. The report will also be individualized for each community we visit so they can obtain some information specific to their needs.

UBC - Okanagan

A community ­based intervention to support belonging among the S. S. Indian­-Canadian diaspora

Project background/need: The idea for this project arose from prior research in the South Similkameen (SS) focused on understanding the experiences of belonging and mental well-being among Indian­ Canadian residents. During this pilot work, we interviewed and consulted with local residents and stakeholders. Key barriers to belonging and wellbeing that Indian-Canadians reported included 1. limited participation in local decision-making; 2. challenges in accessing culturally-appropriate services and; 3. multi-generational tensions hindering community and familial bonding. Potential knowledge/ action: Our project aim is to develop a collaborative planning strategy to launch a community-­based intervention that can address these issues and support a greater sense of belonging and wellbeing among the S.S. Indian-­Canadian diaspora. Jointly with local Indian-Canadian residents and other community partners, we will work to: 1. develop consensus on a priority area that can build a sense of belonging and wellbeing; 2. map out skills and strengths that can help us develop a strategy to address this priority area and; 3. build capacity among local residents to implement and evaluate such an intervention. These activities can change social systems by changing "basic routines" (e.g. decision­ making processes) and beliefs (e.g. assuming services can be 'one size fits all') enabling us to address root causes of exclusion and poor mental health affecting rural immigrant populations.

An Action Plan for Sustainability of TCARE: Building Health-Care Navigation

This new project, adapted from the innovative nurse-led navigator TCARE project funded by Vancouver Foundation in 2013-2014, will now sustain a volunteer model for care. The purpose of this project is to pilot the use of trained volunteers who are partnered with a nurse mentor, to provide navigation services for older adults living in rural communities with life-limiting chronic illness. These rural, older adults often live isolated in the community with little knowledge of, or access to, vital services. The navigation concept is an innovative model for addressing their needs, and there are now a set of navigation competencies to guide this new role. After receiving specialized training, volunteers will provide navigation services to frail, rural, older adults for one year. In their navigation role, they will: advocate for the patient and family; facilitate connections with the community; coordinate access to services and resources; and facilitate active engagement. A comprehensive evaluation of the feasibility and acceptability of the volunteer navigator role will be conducted.

Palliative Care without Borders: Trail/Castlegar Augmented Response (TCARE) Project

Dying, when complicated by uncontrolled symptoms and without the benefit of specialized palliative resources, is traumatic for all involved and leaves a collective community memory. Local community members and care providers in the regions of Trail and Castlegar have identified a critical need for a community-based team approach to respond to the significant challenges that exist in providing high quality, cohesive rural palliative care. UBC Okanagan School of Nursing faculty member, and Canada Research Chair, Dr. Barb Pesut, along with community health nurse, bereavement counselor, and Trail Hospice Society board member Brenda Hooper, are currently engaged in building connections with local health and palliative care professionals and volunteers so as to provide an integrating link for patients and families to community resources. This multi-sector team will work to create a sustainable model of care that will provide coordinated and accessible end-of-life support, impacting the quality of care, and ultimately the quality of life, for dying individuals and their families.

Aboriginal Mentorship Program

Some Aboriginal students face challenges when returning to their communities. Both communities and students often feel that students’ new skills and knowledge were not developed through an indigenous lens. This project identifies and mitigates breakdown points, and helps students share what they’ve learned with their community. Using a structured, three-month mentorship model, students develop, deliver, manage and evaluate a community development program while building relationships with their community.

UBC - School of Population & Public Health

Supporting the Achievement of Health Goals with Formerly Incarcerated Men

The John Howard Society of Canada (JHSC) and UBCs Collaborating Centre for Prison Health and Education (CCPHE) share a deep commitment to improving the health of previously incarcerated individuals. Incarcerated populations suffer vast health inequities compared with the general Canadian population, and 90% of incarcerated individuals are male. This community-based participatory research project aims to answer the question: what are the facilitators and barriers to achieving health and successful reintegration for men leaving federal correctional institutions in BC? All members of the project advisory committee (PAC), including academic, community, and individuals with lived incarceration experience, will work together in the design, execution, analysis, and sharing of research findings. This participatory project will build employment and educational capacity among individuals with incarceration experience, thus addressing a known barrier to reintegration. In the longer-term, this project has the potential to: enhance understanding of the health trajectories for men as they leave prison; create new knowledge that will enhance the current body of academic health literature; facilitate the development of health recommendations and resources for prison-specific organizations regarding what additional services they might facilitate for their clients; and, develop policy recommendations for Correctional Services Canada (CSC) regarding their health discharge planning procedures.

UBC - The Collaborating Centre for Prison Health

Growing Great Kids Out of Homelessness

Children experiencing homelessness have poorer outcomes when compared to other children, their mothers often struggle with social isolation, and there is a strong link to entering the child welfare system. Growing Great Kids Out of Homelessness will address this issue and seek to influence system change by creating a collaborative, multi-sectoral, peer-led participatory research project. Through the opportunity to experience themselves as co-creators of safe, supportive environments, homeless women and children can restore their health and well-being in an environment of dignity that offers women increased agency and engagement with others, while keeping families intact.

Trauma at the Root: Exploring Paths to Healing with Formerly Incarcerated Men

The majority of incarcerated men have experienced trauma in their lives. These trauma experiences are often at the root of substance use, mental illness, and/or violence that lead to involvement in the criminal justice system and can also negatively impact men’s ability to reintegrate into the community. However, there has been little done to explore how to support men in healing from trauma. This project will engage formerly incarcerated men in participatory health research to explore ways to improve trauma supports for both currently and formerly incarcerated men. The findings can be used develop trauma-informed approaches and influence policies and programming from the ground up.

UBC Human Early Learning Partnership (HELP)

Early Years Community Development Institute (EYCDI)

This project is designed to connect and strengthen professionals working in Early Years Community Development (EYCD) across British Columbia and Alberta. It will enhance the infrastructure towards a stronger, more sustainable and community-driven early child development system in our province. Seed funding has allowed for the development of a web-based platform for the Institute, which has markedly increased interest among EYCD professionals, and has grown the volunteer provincial advisory group that is providing leadership to the Institute. The website ( was successfully launched last fall, a series of training webinars have been held, a province-wide contact database has been created, and a twice monthly newsletter is circulated. This proposed project will maintain and grow this work to further embed the EYCDI at the local level. A part-time coordinator will be hired to manage the core operations of the Institute. Work will also be completed on a module-based certification program for EYCD professionals and pilot training sessions will be held.

Early Years Community Developers (EYCD) Institute

The overall aim of the Early Years Community Development (EYCD) Institute will be to build a better, more sustainable and community driven system for the early years in B.C. by creating mechanisms to strengthen the practice of EYCD professionals. The ultimate impact and evidence of a stronger early childhood system will be reflected in improved measures of child development outcomes and community capacity. This is the initial phase of the project. This phase is designed to build the capacity and competency of EYCD Professionals through: •Linking existing EYCD professionals in B.C. through a variety of opportunities for learning, resource sharing, practice-based research and peer mentorship. •Developing and then implementing a program of professional development to include on line as well as face to face sessions. This program will focus on identifying the core competencies of EYCD and establishing flexible approaches for content delivery. . Developing and maintaining a website to host EYCD professional development and networking opportunities.

Umbrella Multicultural Health Co-op

Patient Driven Health Care

Using UMHCs cooperative community health centre (CCHC) model to address the health gaps faced by vulnerable populations (in this case immigrants and refugees) is an innovation that will create scalable change at many levels of the system. Institutional: Approach the MoH as partners working towards the same goal of delivery of quality, cost effective healthcare. After building relationships, our communications will be in alignment with MoH interests; mirroring their language, indicators and metrics, we will adapt how we collect and present data to reflect MoH priorities. With MoH input, we will demonstrate the efficacy of the CCHC with the objective to influence allocation of resources to this type of community led initiative. Organizational: We will work with Health Authorities in building similar relationships and common goals as they implement MoH funding decisions. Network: We will engage co-op and CHC organizing bodies in flipping the routine us vs. them style of advocacy plaguing the relationship between the BC health system and community led health initiatives. Individual: As a young organization, our approach will involve building our capacity in member engagement and public relations, leaving a lasting impact at an individual level as skills developed and systems implemented will be ongoing. With so many barriers to system access, we look forward to a change in ambition as this vulnerable population engages in decision making around their health care.

Umoja Operation Compassion Society of BC

Reaching out to African Immigrant and Refugee Families and Youth

Umoja's Literacy and Life-Skills program that has been running successfully for three years. The program has been designed to address the specific needs of immigrants and refugees from war-torn countries. Our most recent survey indicates that 100% of the participants are satisfied with the program and have reported that the program has met their literacy and life skills needs and has helped them adapt to their new country. So far more than 100 immigrants have participated in the program. Our intention is to continue to offer this vital program and also extend it to the youth. The project has two components to it: (A) The Literacy: English reading, writing, conversation and numeracy. For the youth, we will add the homework assistance component. Participants will attend Literacy/homework program 3 times a week from 4:30-6:30pm. (B) Life Skills: Once a week 6-8pm the project will build Canadian life and leadership skills to integrate successfully into the society through workshops, speakers and out trips.

UNIT/PITT Projects

A Plan for Artist-Run Culture in Vulnerable Communities

We wish to address artists' and cultural workers' complicity in the artwashing and culturewashing of urban development which causes or precipitates harm to the low-income communities whose presence we have benefited from for decades. We wish to develop an alternative plan for artist-run culture, especially addressing Chinatown and the DTES, and use the development of this plan to forge stronger community bonds, creating webs of support between artist-run culture and community self-advocacy. This represents a shift in our thinking, as a type of organization which has valued artistic autonomy above all else, to one which wants to construct a strong social praxis for art.

I Will Survive

I Will Survive is the working title for a series of five works commissioned from emerging artists, including three works commissioned from emerging First Nations artists, to be presented in the fall of 2012 and early 2013. Patterned after our previous commissioning project, Ill Repute, it will be jointly curated by UNIT/PITT director Keith Higgins and artist, curator and community organizer Cease Wyss. Where the previous project drew on the history of the communities of practice, political and social phenomena, and subcultures which intersected with the Helen Pitt Gallery during its 36-year history, the proposed project explores the future of these communities and practices. By envisioning a future, emerging artists and their emerging discourses will take a role in how that future is shaped.

United Chinese Community Enrichment Services Society (S.U.C.C.E.S.S.)

Stories of Our Ancestors: Intergenerational Trauma Among Chinese-Canadian Families

The traumatic narratives of Chinese immigration to Canada and its impact on future generations are mostly unknown. The silence of these migration experiences may be related to surviving collective trauma. Understanding the stigma, shame and fear of Chinese-Canadians who migrated to escape persecution, imprisonment and torture will assist Canadian health care providers to develop strategies to understand and treat pre- and post-migration trauma. Intergenerational trauma is an important construct for understanding the mental health of survivors and their families. We know that individuals and families who have suffered through significant collective traumas are unlikely to obtain professional support. Likewise, Chinese-Canadians underutilize mental health services and there is significant shame and stigma with regards to mental illness in this population. As intergenerational trauma among Chinese people is unexplored in the literature, the social innovation idea is to create a dialogue between older generations and younger generations to work across the divide of silence to bring understanding to family members by breaking the silence of the past. Once the social implications are understood we will be able to devise health care strategies to reduce the stigma and shame of seeking mental health care within this population. As intergenerational trauma is considered to be a broad social determinant of health, it has implications for education, employment, and general well-being.

United Players of Vancouver

Side-drape replacement project

The original drapery & tracks in the theatre (Jericho Arts Centre) were acquired second-hand, prior to 2000. Age has caused a decline in the flame retardant capability of these drapes so they no longer meet the requirements in the British Columbia Fire Code and present a safety risk. Many years of use has also resulted in stains, tears and a general shabby appearance. The old tracks are also damaged and need replacement. The fabric has deteriorated beyond the point that it can be cleaned & re-treated with flame retardants. We raised money and replaced the Main Traveller, Legs, Valance and Lobby drapes in 2008, but had insufficient funds to replace all drapes. If the requested funds are granted, we would be able to complete the project by replacing all the drapes on both sides of the theatre and at the exit doors. New drapes will make the theatre safer by bringing us into compliance with the British Columbia Fire Code flame retardant standards. They will also give a more professional appearance to the theatre.

United Way of Central & South Okanagan/ Similkameen

Toward a Child and Family Poverty Reduction Strategy for the Central Okanagan

We seek to reduce stigma and empower families experiencing poverty, by creating connections and awareness of child and family poverty and its effects. There are many ways poverty is known to raise the risk of lifelong ill effects on health and reduce opportunities for children and youth to realize their full potential. Reducing the impact of family stress and linking families to services makes a difference, only if families feel safe and comfortable accessing those services. Reducing the stigma associated with reaching out for needed services is the first step in making long-lasting systemic change for families in the Central Okanagan.

United Way of Northern British Columbia

Financial Literacy

This project will enable rent banks throughout BC to meet annually to exchange information and jointly review their products and processes, produce annual housing stability reports, and seek stable funding from the provincial government.

Northern Rockies Social Planning Council (NRSPC)

This project will pay for a coordinator to facilitate and sustain the activities needed to achieve its mission and vision, and to examine the social impact from present and future growth resulting from the Horn River Basin and Cordova shale gas discoveries. The project will facilitate strategic planning and establish a model to identify critical and emerging issues; facilitate inception of the Fort Nelson branch of the Northeast Community Foundation; research funding opportunities and facilitate meetings and disseminate information to the public.

United Way of the Fraser Valley

Abbotsford Fresh Food Box and Bulk Buying Club

Consistent access to sufficient, safe and nutritious food is essential for people to live healthy, active lives. However, food bank usage in BC has risen 23% since 2008, with Abbotsford's food bank now serving 3000 people monthly (including 1200 children). In 2009, Abbotsford service providers aimed to build up a food co-op, but it did not come to term. Due to increased need, Vibrant Abbotsford is committed to establishing a Fresh Food Box program and Bulk Buying Club to leverage low-income residents' buying power. The program will purchase household items, non-perishable food and produce at wholesale cost and pass along the savings to participants. It fills a gap by serving people "in-between" emergency food users and those able to afford retail prices, particularly those un-reached by food supports. Food gleaning days, community kitchens and trainings will be integrated to build life skills. The project will establish a sustainable model that can be easily expanded to provide an affordable, accessible and dignified option assisting families to transition out of food insecurity.

University of British Columbia

Jump Step - A participatory approach to physical activity & mental wellness (Co-lead researchers Dr. Joanie Sims-Gould, Assistant Professor UBC and Ron Remick, Medical Director, MDA Psychiatric Urgent)

Note: We have adjusted the proposal title to avoid confusion with Step-by-Step, our previous pilot study of the same name. Anxiety/mood disorders can have devastating effects. They contribute more to the global burden of disease than all cancers combined(i) and 5 of the 10 leading causes of disability worldwide are mental or nervous disorders.(ii) Members of the Jump Step collaboration have both experienced and witnessed the destructive nature of these conditions. As mental health clients or Wellness Partners as MDABC psychiatrists, as investigators, we recognize that current psychiatric treatments are often limited to psychological and/or pharmaceutical interventions. These approaches are useful but do not necessarily 1) address the person nor her/his mental health challenges within a holistic context; nor 2) focus on wellness as the primary outcome (as opposed to disease control). Wellness Partners see a need to investigate the relationship between physical activity (PA) and mental illness (we prefer mental wellness). How can we support adults, suffering from anxiety/mood disorders to engage in PA as a mechanism for promoting and sustaining holistic wellness and healthy lifestyles? Collectively, as wellness partners and practitioners/psychiatrists, knowledge users, and key stakeholders, we will design, implement, and evaluate a PA promotion study based on a community-based needs assessment & identified barriers/facilitators to PA, and the success of our pilot. Research Team: Karim Miran-Khan (UBC), David Adams (Mobility BC), Sarah Lusina-Furst (CIHR), Martin Addison (Mood Disorders Association of BC), Jennifer Davis (Post Doctorate Fellow), Christiane Hoppmann (UBC), Michael Delaney (Lawyer), Sara Vazirian (Mobility BC)

Mathematics First Nations and Inner City K -12 outreach

This project focuses on enabling inner city aboriginal youths in the Lower Mainland and at First Nations schools throughout BC to acquire the necessary mathematical skills to enroll in post-secondary programs in science, engineering and other technical professions. This will be achieved through a combination of activities targeting both students and teachers, including summer math camps, mentorship programs, homework clubs and teacher training workshops. In Vancouver, a year-round support network will be established for at-risk students, including: tutoring by undergraduate mentors, homework clubs and summer math camps. There will be a camp for students transitioning into high school and a separate one for seniors, where students will have an opportunity to work with scientists and other faculty at UBC. Summer camps and mentorship programs will be further expanded to First Nations schools throughout BC. In addition, regular teacher training workshops on mathematics will be organized both in Vancouver and at several First Nations schools, seeking to enhance teaching skills.

Communicating the Case for A New Deal for Families: Phase 2

This project builds on an existing partnership between the Vancouver Foundation, the UBC Human Early Learning Partnership, the United Way of the Lower Mainland and the YWCA of Metro Vancouver. The project aims to transform research into action to address many of the time, income, service and environmental challenges that confront Vancouver families with young children in all their diversity. Previous research shows that the standard of living for the generation raising young children has deteriorated significantly. The same research reveals that public policy has been slow to adapt. This is a bad deal for families. In the absence of policy adaption, over 30 per cent of local children start school vulnerable. Early vulnerability compromises childhood, and has adverse consequences for children’s future school achievement, health, risk of incarceration, and employment success. There is now compelling research to move from a bad deal to a New Deal for Families, including local, national and global evidence about the required policy changes. (see full document for details).

We Want to be Healthy: A Community Engagement Strategy to Enhance Foreign-Born, Older Adult Health and Mobility (Dr. Joanie Sims-Gould)

SVNH has been serving the needs of older adults since 1977 and has developed a strong foundation of services, supports and community engagement activities. In an ongoing effort to serve older adults, SVNH is currently leading the Seniors Hub project. The goal of the Seniors Hub project (Hub) is to create a sustainable network of programs and services to support older adults at the neighbourhood level. Through consultations with SVNH staff, the South Vancouver Seniors' Advisory Council (SAC), local seniors centres/organizations in the SVNH catchment and older adults, priorities for the Hub include understanding the needs and reaching out to under-served foreign-born populations in South East Vancouver (e.g. Vietnamese, Filipino, and Tamil seniors). In response to these identified priorities, we are particularly interested in better understanding the health and mobility needs of the under-served foreign-born older adults living in the SVNH catchment. We know that there are important and significant associations between the design of neighbourhoods, where older adults live and their ability to move within their neighbourhood. The goal of this project will be to better understand the specific health and mobility needs of foreign-born older adults in the SVNH catchment.

Understanding smoking cessation behaviour in Vancouver's Chinese Communities (Dr. Mark Fitzgerald/Ms. Eliza Chang)

For numerous reasons, minority and immigrant communities in Canada may be at greater risk of smoking-related illnesses. This is particularly true among immigrants from Mandarin and Cantonese-speaking communities, where smoking rates remain disproportionately high. To date, millions have been spent on developing smoking cessation interventions, but their effectiveness in diverse cultural communities has been limited, likely because of a variety of social and cultural factors. Through a series of recent focus groups, representatives of Vancouver's Chinese communities have expressed a need for more culturally sensitive strategies to support smoking cessation in their community. We plan to address this need by using community-based participatory approaches to generate new knowledge about why smokers in Vancouver's Chinese communities continue to smoke and what their smoking cessation needs are. Our study will apply a community-academia coalition model, in which a Community Advisory Council (CAC) comprising of representatives from the Chinese community including smokers and non smokers, community key-informants (well-known socially influential/ respected individuals from the Mandarin-speaking and Cantonese-speaking communities), professional groups, and knowledge-users will oversee the project. Our findings will inform the creation of community-driven culturally appropriate resources aimed at reducing smoking rates (and therefore chronic lung & heart diseases) in these communities Research Team: Milan Khara, Tobacco Dependence Clinic; Iraj Poureslami, UBC; Stephem Lam, Lung Tumour Group; Maylene Fong, Evergreen; Ka Wai Cheung, UBC; Farzaneh Osati, Canadian Multicultural Health Promotion Society