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University of British Columbia

Burn survivor quality of life in British Columbia: challenges and opportunities (Dr. Anthony Papp/Ms. Lisa Lacamell)

The objective of this research is to identify the fundamental barriers and facilitators to recovery and reintegration back into work and society among burn survivors living in British Columbia. Considerable research has shown that burn-related injury is a significant contributor to both short- and long-term physical, cognitive, behavioral, and emotional impairments that have significant consequences on individuals, their families, and society at-large. However, we have very limited information about what factors influence the recovery and reintegration of BC’s burn survivor community despite the fact that burn-related injury is a leading cause of injury morbidity across the province. This gap significantly reduces the ability to understand the type of contexts that help populations recover following injury. In recent years, advancements in trauma care have led to tremendous decreases in mortality and reduced hospital length of stay. Unfortunately, the consequences of these improvements are that patients must now face many responsibilities for their care on their own. As such, it is important to obtain information about the resources and social environments that fundamentally contribute to recovery. As many injury survivors likely face similar barriers to recovery, it is important that these information is drawn from narratives from individual survivors to identify how best to strengthen local resource infrastructures. Research Team: Nathaniel Bell, UBC; Heidi Cave, Author; Anthony Papp, BC Professional Firefighters' Burn Unit; Lisa Lacamell, BCPFF Burn Fund

A Participatory Approach to Developing Preventative Health Tools for BC Individuals with Lived Incarceration Experience (Dr. Ruth Martin)

Women and men who have been incarcerated suffer a high prevalence of illness, including chronic disease, cancer, infectious disease, mental illness and substance use. They tend to suffer perpetual social exclusion and are disproportionally affected by the socio-economic determinants for poor health, such as poverty, low health literacy and unstable housing. In 2005-7, women engaging in participatory health research inside a BC prison identified nine health goals as necessary for their successful re-integration into society. A follow-up study to determine barriers to the nine goals, experienced by women during their first 12 months following release from prison, suggests that incarcerated people have limited access to preventive health programs. International research with male prison leavers demonstrated similar results. In this community-based participatory research project, researchers from the UBC Collaborating Centre of Prison Health and Education (CCPHE) will partner with Women in2 Healing and Long Term Inmates Now in the Community to use participatory approaches to design and pilot preventive health tools/programs, and methods to evaluate them, with women and men with past incarceration experience who live in BC communities. It is hoped that BC health organisations and provincial and federal correctional institutions across Canada will adopt recommendations from this project, leading to sustainable improvements in preventive health for incarcerated men and women.

University of British Columbia College of Health Disciplines

Improving care for vulnerable populations through their participation in the education of health professionals (Dr. Angela Towle)

Vulnerable and marginalized populations have problems with access to health care, communication with health professionals and receipt of patient-centred care that goes beyond a bio-medical approach. These problems can be addressed by active involvement of people in the community, who are ‘experts by lived experience’, in the education of health professionals. However, there are major institutional and cultural barriers to the inclusion of vulnerable people as educators, including different understandings of knowledge and expertise, power imbalances, discrimination and stigma, and lack of trust. We propose a knowledge interaction research project that will influence educational policy and practice. The goal is to make the authentic and autonomous voice and expertise of the patient a core part of the education of health professionals. We propose a 3-year inclusive and iterative community-based participatory research project that will inform i) the development of a mechanism for the community to engage with the university for the purpose of influencing health professional education; and ii) the development, implementation and evaluation of an educational model that leads to sustained participation by vulnerable and marginalized populations in the education of health professionals. The project will benefit the community through its ability to influence its future health and social care, and benefit the university in fulfilling its mandate for socially accountable education. Research Team: Scott Graham SPARC; William Godolphin UBC; Cheryl hewitt, North Shore Health Board; Angela Towle UBC

University of British Columbia Department of Pediatrics

Youth ON TRAC: A Health Advocacy Voice for youth with chronic health conditions

Youth aging out of pediatric care report feeling abandoned and helpless in the adult health care system. ON TRAC, a collaborative initiative involving UBC, Child Health BC, BCMA, BC Children’s Hospital and health regions, aims to improve health transition for B.C. youth. Key to success is genuine community-based youth engagement and an active and empowered youth voice. Healthy outcomes for youth will be actualized when youth are involved, active participants in their health care. Youth ON TRAC will directly engage youth with chronic health conditions/disabilities (CHC/Ds) in all processes to create a new, relevant, meaningful, effective, authentic youth health advocacy voice through skills-building training to 1)co-create a needs assessment; 2)develop a youth-led “transition workshop template” and hold workshops; 3)develop online social mentorship; 4)provide education for youth/families; 5)inform health care decision makers on youth-friendly health care transition. Creation of a Provincial Youth Advisory Committee (YAC) within Patient Voices Network (PVN) will ensure sustainability.

University of British Columbia Development Office

2009-2010 Vancouver Foundation First Nations Scholarship

Vancouver Foundation First Nations Scholarship: annual scholarship(s) for a graduate student(s) in the Health Sciences. Established by Dr. John H.V. Gilbert, for a First Nations student enrolled in a professional degree program in Health or Human Services. Students wishing to be considered for the award should apply to the Institute for Aboriginal Health, 429 - 2194 Health Sciences Mall, UBC by the November 30 deadline. The award is made by nomination of the selection committee, Institute for Aboriginal Health.

University of British Columbia Irving K Barber Learning Centre

Indigitization Futures Forum

New models of information practice, grounded in the needs of First Nations governance, language revitalization, heritage preservation and Indigenous access protocols requires a collaborative engagement between those trying to support community information and knowledge management needs, and the broader professional and academic community concerned with supporting these initiatives. The Indigitization team is committed to “clarifying process and identifying issues in the conservation, digitization and management of Indigenous community knowledge” and the Forum is an opportunity to learn from the communities what we can do that will best support this commitment. Supporting knowledge and information workers in communities requires the development of more appropriate tools, relevant training and assessment services in concert with the expressed needs of these practitioners. Now that communities are working to bring their analogue media into the digital realm, they have insights and questions that will inform the development of practices and more relevant information systems designed for the specific needs of Indigenous communities. Those working in the academic context do not have ready-made solutions. It is only by working together, sharing ideas, learning from false starts and successes in the community context that new, “disruptive” information practices will be developed that motivate changes in how information management is transformed in this context.

University of British Columbia School of Nursing

The Sanala Solution: Fostering Namgis Cultural Continuity for Health & Social Well-Being

From 2011-2014 the Sanala Research Team has been working to mobilize Indigenous knowledge and cultural tradition and teachings for community health promotion focusing specifically on youth self-esteem and Namgis Elder social isolation (VF HMER Grant UNR10-0825). The findings from this completed study confirm the critical place that cultural identity and continuity and language revitalization hold for Namgis youth and Elders. Our findings indicate that when cultural activities are woven into the everyday experiences of youth and Elders, both groups report a greater sense of wellness, balance and connection to the community. Elders describe lower rates of depression, social exclusion and chronic pain; youth describe a stronger and more positive identity and connection known to improve mental health and self esteem that act as protective factors against crime and addiction. These findings are the basis for the social innovation proposed for this project, entitled:"The Sanala Solution". The Sanala Solution, to be refined and tested in this project, fosters cultural continuity within the community; cultural continuity is integrally connected to the social inclusion, the most poorly defined and acted upon social determinant of health in the Canadian context. The Sanala Solution will study how to bring cultural continuity, language and inclusion to interface with Namgis health and social policy and programming to effect change that is community-driven and community-led.

"Amlilas": Toward a 'Namgis Community-Driven Curriculum for Early Childhood Development'

This project addresses an identified priority of the 'Namgis First Nations people living in Alert Bay, British Columbia - to enhance the cultural relevance of early childhood education (ECE) so that children are entrenched in their language and cultural practices from their earliest days. Amlilas is the community's existing early childhood program. Through a community-based participatory process, we will build on the existing strengths of this program to support a more culturally relevant curriculum - creating a place where young 'Namgis children learn within their cultural traditions and language. Drawing on existing indicators of early childhood development and data generated in this project, we will propose curricular strategies reflecting unique dimensions of ECD within this community. The knowledge generated in this project will enhance the cultural relevance of ECD for 'Namgis First Nation children and contribute to knowledge informing ECD curricular planning and implementation within First Nations communities in British Columbia.

Fostering Health & Human Rights: A Medical Legal Pilot Study (Judith Lynam, UBC/Kate Hodgon, Network of Inner City Community Services Society)

Our broad concern is to generate insights to foster child and family health equity. We are proposing to undertake research to to examine the ways structural violence operates in the day to day lives of children, youth & families living with marked social and material adversity in Vancouver's inner city. We propose to illustrate the impact of structural violence on health, child development & community well being and to use this analysis to inform the design of a Medical Legal Partnership (MLP). Structural violence refers to 'social structures-economic, political, legal...that stop individuals, groups and societies from reaching their full potential. The idea of structural violence is linked very closely to social injustice and the social machiner of oppression' (Farmer et al, 2004, 2006a,b). 'MLPs integrate legal services as a vital component of the healthcare team. Through direct service, transforming institutions and influencing policy change, MLPs address the non-medical, social determinants of health that have legal remedies' (MLP website). As such, this approach may assist the target community to address the systemic issues that contribute to the poor health profile of children and families. The research will provide the baseline data for an evidence-based approach for addressing structural violence and will inform the development of a strategy, a plan and a financial model. Research Team: Anthony Boardman, UBC Christine Loock, UBC; Lorine Scott, BC Children's Hospital;, Ronald G. Friesen, Continueing Legal Educaiton Society of BC; John Simpson, Legal Services Society

Mobilizing Local "Know-How" for Community Health Action in a Rural Aboriginal Context (Dr. Helen Brown)

This project builds on established relationships between researchers at UBC and the Namgis First Nation in Alert Bay. Alert Bay is a community that grapples with growing unemployment rates, high incidence of alcohol and drug abuse, high rates of chronic illness, and intergenerational trauma. Over the past century this community has lost many traditional practices and much of the use of the Kwak'wala language, and social isolation is a growing problem. Our work in Alert Bay has shown the inseparability of culture and health - findings that support the development of culturally rooted, community-based health actions to address health inequities and optimize health. This participatory project aims to create relevant and sustainable health actions that attend to the social and cultural origins of health priorities identified by the community. The goals of this project are to enlist local 'know-how' to design and test the effectiveness of health actions in two interrelated domains: (1) to mitigate the health impacts of Elders' experiences of social isolation through cultural renewal and Kwak'wala language education, and (2) to enhance mental health and well-being through strengthening cultural identity and community connection. Elders and youth have been identified as priority groups; therefore the project will design and measure of effectiveness of health action with these populations. Research team: Dr. Colleen Varcoe, UBC School of Nursing; Gladys McPherson, UBC School of Nursing; Georgia Cook, Namgis Health Centre; Ruby Peterson, Communtiy Counsellor; Vera Newman, UBC Communtiy Researcher; Wayne Peterson, Gwa'sala-'Nakwaxda'x Principal; Barbara Cramer, UBC Community Researcher;

Examining the Organization of Healthcare for Aging Adults with Intellectual Disabilities in British Columbia: A Critical Interpretive Policy Analysis (Dr. Jennifer Baumbusch)

Between 0.5 and 3% of adults have Intellectual Disabilities (ID) (Boyd, 1997; Crawford, 2008; Statistics Canada, 2008). Within British Columbia (BC) and beyond, there is growing recognition that the healthcare needs of aging adults with ID will not be met by the current system (Janicki et al., 2002; Ouellette-Kuntz, 2007; Temkin, 2009). This study grew out of previous research about the healthcare needs of aging adults with ID in BC (Baumbusch & Phinney, 09/10). The study brings together researchers, Community Living organizations, healthcare providers and recipients of care to examine the implementation of healthcare policy into practice. In BC, Health Services for Community Living (HSCL) is a provincial policy, introduced following the closure of institutions for adults with ID, which specifically addresses the healthcare needs of this population. The aim of this study is to increase understanding of potential policy-practice gaps in the implementation of HSCL and other relevant policies. We will collect data through policy analysis, focus groups, and key informant interviews. In order to gain urban and rural perspectives, data will be collected in the three health authorities. The focus groups and interviews will explore the translation of policies into practice. Findings from this research will generate new knowledge about healthcare for aging adults with ID and will lead to recommendations for policy and service renewal in this area.

University of British Columbia School of Occupational & Environmental Hygiene

Community Gardening as a Path to Well-Being (Co-lead Researchers: Dr. Melinda Suto, Assistant Professor, UBC and Mr. Darrell Burnham, Executive Director, Coast Foundation Society)

The project arose as the co-leads discussed what people living with mental illness could do to improve their health and well-being. The research questions are: 1) How does participation in a community garden affect the well-being and social connections of people living in supported housing? 2) How do we engage people in a physical activity (community gardening) that encourages better health and social connections for people living in supported housing? Research and policy reports support community gardening as a catalyst for positive health; clinicians confirm the need for this type of non-medical strategy. Participants will join the advisory group; do data collection and analysis; use findings to guide changes; create and deliver knowledge translation products. Participants’ involvement in community gardening will improve physical health and access to fresh produce, decrease isolation and foster community engagement with others. There are opportunities to learn skills, share knowledge and mentor; this may encourage people to try new activities. Findings from this project will educate the public, create connections with like-minded people and shape policy decisions on future gardens. Broader knowledge contributions will occur in academic publications, which can provide evidence for the recovery model in mental health. We anticipate expanding community gardens in the region and helping people move from the margins of society to the mainstream, through a popular activity. Research Team members: Mr. Rudy Small, Research Team member and Ms. Cathy Taylor, Research Team member.

University of British Columbia School of Social Work

Sexual Health Knowledge and Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Participatory Theatre Project

This project focuses on improving sexual health knowledge and positive sexuality among adults with intellectual disability(ID). Using community-based participatory methods, we will use mixed methods to create, produce and evaluate a participatory theatre project on sexual health, sexuality and ID. The origins of participatory theatre are in community development, arts and social movements. Practitioners of participatory theatre are committed to innovation, collaboration, capacity building and social transformation. As such, it is a well-suited approach for addressing the sexual rights of adults with ID who are often constructed as asexual and childlike and/or lacking sexual boundaries. Our participatory theatre will be developed using arts-based qualitative methods to identify what information and tools are needed to achieve successful sexual health and sexuality. These findings will inform the development of sexual health educational tools and resources as well as the creation, delivery and evaluation of three participatory theatre performances. These products are aimed at increasing knowledge about sexual health and sexuality for individuals with ID and aimed at minimizing barriers and social stigma associated with sexuality and ID. The performances will be delivered in New Westminster. It is anticipated that the performance will be replicated in other communities adding to the project's ongoing scope of influence to advance positive change related to sexuality and ID.

Sexual Health Knowledge and Intellectual Disability (Dr. Rachelle Hole, UBC / Angela Clancy, Family Support Institute)

Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) face unique challenges in relation to sexual health and realizing their sexual identity and expression. A lack of appropriate sexual education is evident. This lack of education increases threats of disease, abuse, and/or mental health issues, especially for those who do not conform to heterosexual norms. The FSI and the CIC are working to foster dialogue, develop resources and support leadership to address this community identified need. In this project, FSI and the CIC will partner with key stakeholders (e.g., Spectrum Society, Langley Association), centring the voices, experiences and leadership of individuals with ID (self advocates), to build understanding, awareness and capacity about sexual health, sexual expression and sexual diversity for individuals with ID, families and service providers. Within a participatory frame, we will engage with self advocates and allies to identify gaps in sexual health knowledge; develop knowledge and community resources for promoting positive sexual health and sexuality; and, engage stakeholders to develop and implement knowledge translation strategies. The research questions are: 1) What are self advocates' experiences of sexual health knowledge and education? 2) What information is needed to achieve successful sexual health education and positive sexual expression? 3) What strategies do self advocates and allies identify as most effective to promote positive sexual health and sexuality?

University of Northern British Columbia

Investigating bottlenecks and barriers to cancer care in Haida Gwaii (Dr. Robert Olson/Dr.Tracy Morton)

The project idea is in response to a specific request to the principal investigator from health care providers, on behalf of the people in Haida Gwaii, to address difficulties concerning cancer diagnosis and care in isolated Aboriginal communities. Not only does geographical isolation make it difficult to access tertiary services, but social and cultural factors form potential barriers to accessing cancer services. The health care providers identified a need for a comprehensive electronic database of their entire population, which will enable them to participate in health care improvements and research. A research team, comprised of experts in family practice, Aboriginal health, information technology, oncology, epidemiology and biostatistics will identify all patients with a histologically confirmed diagnosis of cancer in Haida Gwaii and collect demographic data, family and personal medical histories and lifestyle information for each patient. All data will be populated in a database that will allow for analysis to identify common delays in care, survival analysis and statistical comparisons of Aboriginal vs. non-Aboriginal patients for each outcome. This project has the potential to improve Aboriginal care in Haida Gwaii and other Aboriginal remote communities by identifying bottlenecks and barriers in care and advocating for measures to address these issues; through education and resource allocation.

From Front Door to Grocery Store: Getting seniors where they want to be (Dr. Greg Halseth/Ms. Leslie Groulx)

Rural BC is experiencing a rapidly aging population, and long-time residents are choosing to remain in their 'home' communities. Most of these communities face significant challenges in meeting the mobility needs of seniors, including harsh winters, poor physical infrastructure, and lack of services. Clearwater BC has made a commitment to becoming an age-friendly community. This project focuses on seniors mobility in the community. It emerged from a well-established partnership involving the CDI, the District of Clearwater and the Age-Friendly Community Committee, which is comprised of seniors organizations and organizations serving seniors. The research project will engage local seniors in an assessment of shopping and service areas, community facilities, walking routes, and transportation. These field sessions will be complemented by workshops to review, and increase awareness of, the issues. The project will also involve in-depth interviews to explore considerations such as safety, accessibility, affordability, inclusiveness, helpfulness, and respect. The final report from the project will include information and recommendations that can be used in planning and decision-making around mobility, an action plan, and the community mobility assessment tool that will be developed. This will be a resource that Clearwater can use into the future. It will also be distributed for use and adaptation by other communities in BC, Canada and beyond. Research Team: Greg Halseth, UNBC; Leslie Grouix, District of Clearwater; Donald Manson, UNBC; Neil Hanlon, UNBC; Dawn Hemingway, UNBC; Laura Ryser UNBC; Jessica Blewett, UNBC; Anne Hogan RDFFG;

Bridging the Cs: Community, Connectedness, and Collaborative partnerships to improve the Cardio-metabolic health of individuals with enduring mental illness. (Dr. Candida Graham/Ms. Nansi Long)

This project aims to answer the question: How do we help clients with enduring mental illness [EMI] achieve and maintain healthier lifestyles, decreasing their risks of cardio-metabolic disorders, through community, connectedness and collaboration? This project will not only empower clients to take action but also provide new research data on effective methods to overcome barriers, such as stigma, to improve health behaviours in clients with EMI. Using the themes of understanding, self-determination & client generated solutions the researchers will engage in an iterative process with this vulnerable & disadvantaged community to shape SMART (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic & Timely) health initiatives. The project will sequentially: 1.Invite engagement from clients in the review of preliminary study data 2.Explore client's internal & external factors, which lead to positive change in lifestyle 3.Shape & implement community lead health initiatives 4.Evaluate the initiative outcomes. Primary outcomes will be quantitative measures of change in health behaviours, work & social adjustment, community connectedness, quality of life, measures of self-determination & the characteristics of initiatives the community shape. The main hypothesis is that in line with self-determination theory, the empowerment of clients will lead to better engagement and continuance with lifestyle changes. Research Team: Crystal Rollings UNBC/UBC; Dr. Brenda Griffiths, Lesley Anderson, United Way; Lynn Smoliak, BC Schizophrenia Society; Sarah de leeuw, UNBC; Megan Davies, York University, Diane Purvey, Kwantlen Polytechnic University; Candida Graham, UNBC; Nansi Long, BC Schizophrenia Society

University of the Fraser Valley

S'iwes Totí:lt Q'ép - Teaching and Learning Together: Indigenizing the Academy

'Indigenizing the Academy' is about integrating and centering Indigenous people and their knowledge in education. Most post-secondary institutions adopt tenets of indigenization but still face administrative challenges related to curriculum, student experiences, governance, recruitment/retention of Indigenous faculty and students. The project idea arises from UFV's Education Plan, which recognizes the need to recruit/retain Indigenous faculty, maximize success of Indigenous students, and develop relations with Indigenous communities to benefit all students and universities. Members of Canadian post-secondary institutions will be served by this project, specifically senior administrators, staff/faculty, community stakeholders including Elders, education coordinators and Indigenous students. The project promotes knowledge exchange between institutions via: a two-day gathering of teams of institutional representatives on indigenization; a Stó:lo Sweat and Feast; DVDs from events; a cross-institutional audit; interactive website; and a manual of challenges and best practices.

University of Victoria

The Ocean Soundscape

June 16, 2014, the Vancouver Aquarium and ONC co-hosted a workshop for BC hydrophone experts/owners to discuss how best to coordinate, manage, interpret, and monitor the soundscape of our ocean. This coalition devised a cohesive vision to create a combined digital coastal network that would foster a safe and sustainable marine environment through the creation of four working groups (Research, Technical Development, Data & Products, and Policy). It is imperative to understand the impact on marine life of the volume and frequency of human-made sound in the sea, which is rapidly increasing. This coalition is comprised of scientists, industry and coastal communities working together to quantify how the ocean soundscape is changing and developing solutions to influence policies. ONC seeks funding for a 1-year Ocean Soundscape Coordinator to facilitate the four working groups and deliver their results based on sound scientific principles and document them in a report. The report will form the basis of a larger combined funding proposal targeting other entities to deliver their results.

Development Phase - Community Food Literacy Participatory Action Research Project (Co-lead Researchers: Dr. Trevor Hancock, Professor, UVIC and Ms. Linda Geggie, Coordinator, Capital Region Food and Agriculture Initiatives Roundtable).

The Development Grant will help us to bring together academic and community partners to develop the Community Food Literacy PAR Project proposal. Community practitioners have identified the need to build community food literacy. We define food literacy to be the ability to access, understand and evaluate information related to food (e.g., how to select and prepare food), including knowledge of where food comes from, its environmental impact and the connection to food through culture and society. The project will advance our understanding of how to coordinate and strengthen community food literacy programs that empower participants to increase control over, and improve their health. A multi-sector advisory group will support the project team to engage community agencies to contribute to and refine, our working definition of food literacy. We will share the information gathered through the Community Food Feasibility Study (appendix 2) in regards to current practices, gaps and opportunities to build food literacy. We will ask the community to reflect on the findings, refine and prioritize research questions, and identify the best methods to gather, share, and take action on what we learn together. In addition at the BC Food Systems Network Gathering we will determine the best methods for knowledge translation so that we can effectively share our findings. Finally we will develop a research proposal and formalize partnerships to move the project forward. Research Team members: Ms. Wanda Martin, Co-Researcher, Mr. Aaren Topley, Research Team member, and Ms. Joan Wharf Higgins, Research Student support.

University of Victoria - Faculty of Human and Social Development

Child & Youth Care in Action IV

The Child & Youth Care in Action conference takes place every two years at the University of Victoria. It is led by the School of Child and Youth Care within the faculty of Human & Social Development, however, partners with a number of disciplines including Education, Social Work, Women’s Studies and Indigenous Governance. The purpose of the conference is to bring together research, practice, theory, and policy as they relate to children, youth, families, and communities. The conference also has a strong focus and commitment to bringing those most affected by these issues, the actual children, youth and families themselves, to the conference as expert panelists, speaking to their own lived experience in order to help practitioners, researchers and policy-makers ‘connect the dots’ between theory/research and implications for communities. It is extremely expensive and costly for members of these remote communities to travel into larger cities like Vancouver and Victoria. The University of Victoria has waived all the registration fees for youth delegates and have secured funding from corporate sponsors to pay for staff accompanying these youth as well as lodging for the 3 days for mentors and youth. The funding from Vancouver Foundation will assist in supporting a small portion of each of the 10 youth’s travel. The Child & Youth Care in Action conference sets aside 50 of the 200 participant spots for youth from around British Columbia to participate as delegates but also in leading some of the concurrent workshops. Funding from Vancouver Foundation’s CYF committee will support 10 Aboriginal youth from extremely remote first nations communities (Carrier Sekani, Bella Bella, Nuu-chah-nulth, Chilcotin) to be able to travel to Victoria with mentors/staff who will support them in their conference presentations or as conference delegates. The approval of this small amount of funding will enable 10 young people’s meaningful participation in sharing their experiences, histories and work leading social change in their communities. This program grant is aligned with CYF’s priority to support youth engagement and leadership in remote communities around the province.

Indigenous, Participatory, Culturally-Grounded Arts-Informed Research Insititute 2015 (Researchers: N/A)

Indigenous, Participatory, Culturally-Grounded Arts-Informed Research Insititute 2015 (Research Team: N/A)

Indigenous Child Well-being Training Initiative

UVic has developed an Indigenous Child Well-being Research Network and has piloted training for Indigenous communities on child well-being best practices for the last 2 years. Each training session is developed in advance with community input. The training supports the Indigenous knowledge inherent in the community engaging Elders, adults and youth to learn about positive Indigenous child well-being best practices in order to inform public policy at all levels. They want to know how the current system works and how they can become more independent eg. through Granny Clubs, youth mentorship groups, etc., in order to protect and keep their children in their own communities. The training facilitates knowledge mobilization and the adaptation of promising practices to local contexts. Cultural metaphors such as basket weaving, dip nets or disappearing oolichan fish are used to provide an appropriate cultural context grounded in respect, relevance, reciprocity and responsibility.

Mitigating mining-induced health impacts in Fort St. James and Nak'azdli, BC

This project will develop an intervention to mitigate the impacts of mine development on the health of two Northern communities, located near BC’s newest approved mine. The project is a unique collaboration, bridging the issues of health and mining engineering as well as an Aboriginal and a non-Aboriginal community (Nak'azdli and Fort St. James). The project will use a community-based participatory approach and knowledge translation to develop an intervention to maximize mining-related social, economic, and health benefits.

Knowledge Translation of Barriers to Safe Drinking Water in BC Aboriginal Communities

This application is to fund an extension to work on issues related to access to safe drinking water that has been completed by Darlene Sanderson PhD within six separate Aboriginal communities in remote areas of British Columbia. The project is one of community-focused participatory research directly involving members of the communities whose health is affected by lack of access to safe water. For example, one of the communities in which a workshop was held has been on a boil water advisory for the last sixteen years. Activities: The funds will be used to capture the outcomes of six workshops conducted within each of the Aboriginal communities.Dr. Sanderson will analyze data drawn from the workshops and then compare findings from the analysis to findings from a literature search and an environmental scan in order to identify high impact actions that could be taken at local levels to address particular issues relating to access to safe water. Findings will be recorded in reports to each of the six Indigenous communities and made available to them. This stage of the project will build on the momentum generated during the workshops within each of the communities; develop greater understanding of issues around health and access to safe water;and provide community members with the opportunity to take a direct stake in the process of moving knowledge to action.