Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Village of Queen Charlotte

Humpback Whale Sculpture

This public art project will be a life-size, copper clad sculpture of the first third of a breaching Humpback Whale, over five meters tall. It will be constructed by Lon Sharp, the local artist who also created the giant ten meter coho salmon sculpture in neighboring Sandspit. It will be constructed using a yellow and red cedar framework, along with polyethylene tubing and will be sheathed in copper. The base will be cast concrete and steel, with stainless steel structural reinforcement and support for the long pectoral fin. This fin will likely be a magnet for climbing children, so structural integrity is as important as artistic excellence and community engagement. The sculpture will be installed in the middle of the Visitor Centre's interpretive garden, which is situated in the village's downtown core, adjacent to the gathering place we call 'Spirit Square'. Queen Charlotte's recently completed one km.long waterfront sea walk starts a few meters north of the sculpture site and continues south through Spirit Square, and then west along the waterfront.
$20,000.00
2014

Village of Salmo

Renovation and Upgrades to Youth Centre

This project involves renovating the existing Youth Centre space and creating a new and expanded space for the youth. This will create a distinct and separate place for them to hold their Youth Leadership Program, Youth Drop In, Teen Fitness classes and run the Movie Cinema. Included in the project are the creation of a new commercial kitchen where Youth will have their weekly Supper Nights as well as host the concession for the 'Youth Run Movie Cinema'. The creation of this new kitchen will also allow the Youth Leadership to create goods to sell at Youth Program fundraising events.
$34,300.00
2013

Virsa - Sikh Alliance Against Youth Viol

Junior Leadership

Our Junior Leadership program promotes self-esteem, self-worth and enables youth to envision and actualize their own potential. This program is a new project based approach to reach these students as the previous after school homework help mentorship program we were running was no longer appealing to these students. As an elementary school-based program, each individual Junior Leadership program caters to the students' and schools' needs. This program is a project based program that will allow youth to tap into their leadership skills while taking ownership and a leadership role on multiple projects. These projects will then be a means for the students to fundraise towards a charity of their choice. This program is designed to allow youth to experience the fulfillment of community involvement as their projects will benefit community organizations and allow them to see how an individual can truly make a difference.
$8,000.00
2010

Volunteer Victoria

Stage Based Solutions for Volunteers Aging In Place

To meet the gaps generated by shifting demographics Volunteer Victoria will need significantly more information, strategies, and tools to support one, two, or all of the following groups: a. senior volunteers aging out of their current volunteer positions, b. agencies relying on large numbers of senior volunteers aging in place and/or staging out of volunteering, and c. organizations that serve seniors to become more efficient and innovative in how they use, train, and recruit and retain volunteers The process involves: Forming an advisory committee made up of seniors and senior serving agencies Developing and implementing a methodology and system to collect data from a minimum of 500 seniors and 250 local organizations Designing research questions and formats for gathering information and reviewing the landscape Identifying potential partners who share a vision to serve seniors more effectively Reviewing the data and making recommendations with the advisory group Assessing the development phase Working with partners to articulate a shared vision and preferred outcomes moving forward Developing a 3 to 5 year program plan that involves multiple stakeholders groups and seniors in a scaleable model
$10,000.00
2015

Watari Research Association

Board Decolonization and Capacity Building Project

We are committed to building an accessible, civil, supportive environment by including people across a range of religions, gender expressions, ethnicities, races, sexual orientations, abilities, ages and socioeconomic classes. Our current Action Plan combines a systemic approach to decolonization with a recognition of the significance that Indigenous and racialized immigrants/migrants provide, and engages staff and Board in implementing a work plan examining how we support the community in general, and how to locate structural/service gaps within our organization. While we realise that decolonization is lengthy and complex, we begin this process by addressing a primary critique arising from our Action Plan: our Board of Directors does not represent the communities we support. The Board recognizes this gap between intention and reality, and is willing to initiate a process on how to include meaningful participation by members of these communities. We plan to involve two facilitators in the process: one Indigenous and one migrant organizer. Their guidance and assistance will be the main driver in shaping of the conversation with the Board, staff and communities. In order to implement this process, we will ask Indigenous/First Nations and Migrant organizations, groups, and communities with whom we are already connected to share practical/creative approaches to rebuilding our process. Members these groups have expressed their willingness to accompany us on this path.
$10,000.00
2018

Youth Housing Collaboratory

The Youth Health & Housing Collaboratory is an initiative currently funded by Fostering Change. The Collaboratory's goal is to generate positive change and improve the experience of vulnerable/marginalized youth with complex needs who seek and access housing and related health services in Vancouver. It brings partners together to work better and differently to meet youth health, social, and housing needs. The Collaboratory has achieved several goals since its inception: 1.Establishing a Collaboratory problem solving group – to implement collectively arrived at solutions based on collectively arrived at processes 2.Engaging stakeholders to collaboratively identify and action initial improvements within the continuum of housing and related services for youth 16-24. 3. Securing commitment for sustainable collective process that will be able to support ongoing implementation of new solutions in the realm of youth access to housing. The purpose of next phase is to: Implement/test/assess impact of ‘probes’ (i.e. small, doable but significant systems and practice changes) that have been informed by the youth and service provider engagement work to date. To improve services and the experience of youth who are dealing with multiple challenges. Continue to engage youth to help identify most promising ‘probes’ and next iterations/ideas. Work together to extend/amplify/spread probes into practice and system. Continue learn,share knowledge and build a community of practice.
$50,000.00
2016

Eastside Integrated Youth Outreach Team

The Eastside Integrated Youth Team(EIYT) will provide outreach to youth in the Downtown Eastside six days weekly with the addition of two new members.The focus will be early intervention with youth under 19 who come into the community.The roles of these positions will include engagement, assessment, referral and follow-up with youth and the team of service providers/family that support them.Using the existing Hard Target Table as a point of entry, youth workers with EIYT will leverage their relationships with adult outreach teams, hotel staff and community members to identify new youth and intentionally engage with them to develop exit strategies.Existing connections with the youth serving system including MCFD, youth addictions, mental health, police and primary health care will allow youth workers to design and implement individualized case management response to each youth. The intention of these positions is to work effectively with a smaller number of youth as opposed to provide the broader outreach of general street outreach. One worker will have a psych nursing background.
$90,000.00
2013

Transition to Independence Program - TIP II

$70,000.00
2012

Latin American Families: Kitchen Connections

Newcomer families arrive with hopes and wishes for a bright future in Canada. They are provided with information regarding the process of immigration but left to understand the process of integration on their own. The Latin American Families Kitchen Connections Project will focus on groups of 10 newcomer moms and their children under 6, providing a safe welcoming space weekly to enjoy a meal, meet peers experiencing similar struggles and recieve education from the Canadian systems that will most affect their ability to succeed in Canadian culture. This 12 week group will be co-faciliatated by community service professionals and a peer mom, providing a meal to gather around, childcare for the children and curriculum reflecting keeping families healthy and informed. Areas of focus include: stages of child development, the school system, sexual health/harm reduction, communication, stress management, child protection legislation.
$2,888.00
2011

Watershed Watch Salmon Society

Connected Waters: Reconnecting lower Fraser Valley waterways for healthy salmon and communities

The lower Fraser River floodplain was once one of the richest ecosystems in the world, with abundant fish and wildlife, but has been heavily degraded through urbanization and agriculture. A vast network of aging flood control infrastructure, installed to protect homes and farms, also blocks wild Fraser salmon from accessing vital nursery habitats. Connected Waters aims to change how floods are managed in our changing climate, to reconnect and restore habitat for at-risk species, to improve local recreation, and to support reconciliation, while better protecting communities and farms from flooding. Bringing our flood infrastructure into the 21st century will benefit people and fish alike.
$294,970.00
2019

Connected Waters: Reconnecting lower Fraser Valley waterways for healthy salmon and communities

This project aims to upgrade water flow and flood risk management of local waterways to better account for social/ecological values like wild salmon, clean water, and natural beauty. It will change: Basic routines: Landowners and municipalities will use fish-friendlier flood control systems, improving habitat quality and fish abundance, while maintaining flood control and agricultural functionality. Socially, restored ecological connectivity will improve community enjoyment and recreation. Resource flows: Restoration of ecological connectivity within the lower Fraser floodplain will become a higher priority in federal, provincial, and municipal flood management studies and spending. Authority flows: Federal laws (e.g. Fisheries & Navigation Protection Acts) and provincial laws (e.g. Water Sustainability Act) meant to protect salmon, water, and community access will be better applied to these formerly high-value habitats that are now primarily governed by BC’s Diking Act. First Nations’ rights and title may also be applied. Beliefs: Citizens will increasingly view these degraded waterways as vibrant sources of community enjoyment. Improvements to our initial target waterways—along with regional, provincial, and federal policy improvements—should create a systemic “ripple effect” across the region as more citizens, stewardship groups, First Nations, and municipalities see that changing the status quo in flood management is possible on their local waterways.
$196,981.00
2016

WCRA

PGE Historical Exhibition

The Pacific Great Eastern Railway is British Columbia's own railway, and is responsible for establishing many British Columbia industries and the communities that grew around them. It is a unique story about how a railway 'from nowhere to nowhere' (North Vancouver to Whytecliff and Squamish to Quesnel) was created in 1912 to 1915, and actually survived and ultimately prospered. This story has never been told in any sort of permanent exhibition. The project proposed here will develop and install such a permanent exhibition in the Mac Norris Station (which was designed by the PGE in 1915 and then built at our West Coast Railway Heritage Park in Squamish). With the centennial of Squamish next year, the timing is ideal to permanently capture this history for all. The project consists of story research and writing, professional design and production, and installation of storyboard and video exhibition. The exhibition will serve the entire Squamish community and will also be seen by the more than 60,000 visitors and school groups who visit the Heritage Park each year from Metro Vancouver.
$7,500.00
2013

Wen Wei Dance Society

New work by Wen Wei Dance

In his new full-length dance for seven performers (including Wang), Wen Wei Wang explores the human quest for connection. Wang intends to compose a new work that impacts more personally and emotionally on the observer, one that depends on the direct communication of emotions from the body. It is a return to the body to capture the purity, quality and power of movement. In examining the body’s intrinsic abilities and limits, and the emotions that are hidden within it, the deeply personal is relayed between performer and audience.
$15,000.00
2011

West Coast Environmental Law Research Foundation

Climate Law in our Hands – Phase 2

The economics of the global climate crisis are all wrong. As long as the balance sheets of global fossil fuel companies contain only the profits from oil, gas and coal, but none of the costs, those companies, their investors and governments will all make poor business choices. As our communities experiencing growing climate costs, we have the power to insist that those balance sheets need to include a share of those costs and that the companies begin taking responsibility for their products. Phase 2 of CLOH builds on its initial success to catalyze additional and increasingly forceful legal action by local communities for fossil fuel accountability.
$300,000.00
2019

Climate Law in our Hands

What if climate impacted communities could demand accountability from the fossil fuel industry? BC is uniquely placed to force a conversation about industry responsibility for climate change and its costs. We will foster legal and community action aimed at demanding accountability from fossil fuel companies, ultimately leading to a local government class action against fossil fuel companies. By focusing on harm suffered by BC communities, we can hold Chevron, Exxon and similar companies responsible for the impact of their global share of emissions. Public demands for accountability and especially a lawsuit will both require and result in broader public education and discussion. Convincing local governments to take such action will require British Columbians to understand and support fossil fuel industry accountability. The success of litigation depends on a broad societal shift in understanding the role of the fossil fuel industry in causing climate change. We will undertake provincial coordination, support and networking between groups seeking to promote public discussion of the harm caused to their communities by the fossil fuel industry and the potential for litigation, including providing legal educational materials;* and provide submissions and assistance to local governments that might act as plaintiffs in a class action. *Any tasks involving activities considered political by the CRA will be carried out to a large extent by our sister organization, WCELA
$225,000.00
2016

Protecting the Communities and Ecosystems of the Salish Sea

Zoom online meeting software Meeting the challenge of climate change impacts like sea level rise has created an opportunity to deepen regional collaboration and improve environmental management and protection in the Salish Sea. A scientific report commissioned by West Coast in 2014 from the Fisheries Centre at UBC presents the “business case” to protect our coastal ecosystems, and documents case studies from other coastal areas around the world showing how coastal “green” infrastructure has effectively managed the impacts of extreme weather events. However, the effectiveness of green infrastructure measures is relatively limited if only implemented in a single municipality, and planning and implementation at a regional scale is necessary, which is what we will facilitate through this project. Our own legal research and analysis to date has helped identify examples of mechanisms and structures that would be effective in planning, co-managing, monitoring and enforcing environmental protection at a regional scale using an integrated approach, and there is willingness among key actors for regional collaboration.
$30,000.00
2014

Environmental Strategy Retreat

We are collaborating with other organizations and First Nations involved in the Tar Sands Campaign (TSC) to implement a training, networking and information sharing retreat to bring together individuals working on tar sands issues. The TSC is a complex campaign that includes native and non-native activists from across BC, related campaigns in Europe, the US, and Canada, on diverse topics of pipelines, markets, and tar sands production. Ensuring our wide range of campaigners have the capacity to collaborate effectively been a challenge. In 2012 we overcame this through a retreat for over 80 activists that focused on skill building, learning, and network strengthening. It was an incredible success and led to significant cross border organizing, cross sector collaboration and better practices in communications. In 2013, we would like to hold the Retreat again with a focus on new priorities as identified from 2012 evaluations, such as more in depth strategic planning and training on how to connect and engage BC residents and communities. We will offer a minimum of 30 scholarships.
$7,500.00
2013

Managing Cumulative Impacts on BC's Ecosystems and Communities: Legal Solutions

Many rural regions are simultaneously dealing with proposals for mining, forestry, hydroelectric, oil and gas development, and related roads, power-lines and other infrastructure, while urban areas face increasing populations and demands for land use, yet BC currently lacks a legal framework to proactively and comprehensively manage the cumulative impacts of these issues to protect the environment and human well-being. In this project we will focus on two ‘hot button’ issues where political, economic and public attention is bringing the question of cumulative impacts management to a head, in order to create momentum behind needed reforms: 1) liquified natural gas development, particularly as it impacts multiple values in the Northwest; 2) sea level rise in the Lower Mainland. We will rely on West Coast’s multi-year research of best practices in cumulative impacts management from around the world, including our analysis of more than 25 regional governance models as a foundation, and work with a range of allies to support the development of collaborative solutions in these 2 regions.
$28,000.00
2013

Enabling a Greener BC Economy: Law Reform for Forest Ecosystems & Climate Change

Policies are urgently needed in British Columbia to protect the environment and sustain BC communities in an era of climate change. This multi-year project will assess the existing laws governing BC forests (approximately 80% of BC's land base) and advocate for corresponding law and policy reform.
$40,000.00
2011

Enabling a Greener BC Economy: Law Reform for Forest Ecosystems & Climate Change

To develop a law reform proposal on evolving forest policy and legislation to address climate change and enable new revenue streams for forest-dependent communities. This project would refine and advance this proposal by engaging with opinion leaders from conservation groups, First Nations, industry, local governments and senior government decision-makers (both provincial and First Nations).
$30,000.00
2010

West Coast LEAF Association

Strategic Litigation for Equality

Our project aims to bring about more equality by identifying systemic human rights issues, developing legal arguments and potential remedies, and using strategic litigation to create transformative systemic change. Strategic litigation uses the courts to create meaningful legal and social change. Through this process, we can work to right wrongs, and help those who experience discrimination have an opportunity to protect and defend their rights. This project fits into our broader aim of actualizing a legal system that is accessible and just; that will help reduce and ultimately end inequality; and that is responsive to the unique needs of women and gender-diverse people.
$299,998.18
2019

Strategic Litigation for Equality

Our project improves access to justice by identifying systemic issues and bringing forward test case litigation. By the end of the project, we will have identified 3-6 potential test cases and 10-15 interventions. Test case (strategic) litigation are cases that have the potential to create broad systemic change. Such cases may be brought by an individual whose rights have been infringed or by an organization who is acting in the public interest. Strategic litigation is always for the benefit of society rather than only for individuals involved. Test cases are vehicles for social and legal change: for example, strategic litigation led to the legalization of same sex marriage. High profile recent examples include Carter (death with dignity) and Bedford (prostitution laws challenge). Despite the significance of this tool for systemic change, West Coast LEAF is the only Canadian organization with the capacity and mandate to develop strategic litigation to ensure women’s equality under the law. Strategic litigation spurs policy reform, creates legal change, fuels public dialogue, and challenges mainstream assumptions about effective ways to support the most marginalized in society. Similarly, intervening in an ongoing case (that is, applying to the court to make submission in cases that may impact women’s equality) can be an effective and less resource intensive way to influence public opinion and bring voices of diverse and marginalized women into the corridors of power.
$150,000.00
2016

Mothering with Disabilities

This project will investigate legal and policy reform solutions to the challenges that disabled mothers encounter. We will collect qualitative data using feminist narrative inquiry (focus groups and semi-structured interviews with mothers with disabilities, and women with disabilities seeking to be mothers) and through interviews with key informants (service providers and advocates). We will also conduct legal research. Research questions include: 1. What are the legal issues facing mothers with disabilities? 2. What are the legal rights of mothers with disabilities and how do existing laws and policies impact these women’s rights as parents? 3. How should these laws and policies be reformed to ensure greater respect for the rights of mothers with disabilities? We anticipate addressing the following topics: reproductive rights; child protection; adoption law; family law; immigration law; social services; violence against mothers with disabilities; and employer responsibilities. Findings will be presented in a report to policy-makers, and will include law reform recommendations.
$43,000.00
2013

West Kootenay Environmental Centre

Engaging West Kootenay Industry Stakeholders in a Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Future

To avoid global warming beyond 1.5C by 2100 we need to decarbonize by 2050. Each country and community needs to do its fair share to transition to a 100% renewable energy economy to avoid the worst climate impacts. Cities are leading the transition at the community-level, which includes transportation, electricity and buildings. As cities lead, industry’s carbon pollution must be addressed to reach 100% renewable. We’re working with local governments and industry workers to clarify the government’s relationship with industry in the transition to renewables, and with local residents to garner support for renewable energy in communities that rely on carbon-intensive industry for local jobs.
$10,000.00
2017

West Kootenay Women's Association Nelson & District Women's Centre

Rooted in Community

To create an innovative and comprehensive community-based volunteer training program accessible to all residents in the Nelson area. The training will be using an anti-oppression framework and include workshops from a variety of different social service organizations discussing the services they offer, the challenges they address in the community and volunteer opportunities in their organizations. The training will take place over several weeks, giving participants not only the time necessary to find the right fit between themselves and a volunteer opportunity, but also to create connections and a network of support with each other.
$8,220.00
2015

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