Grants

Search or browse below to see past Field of Interest grants. You may search by recipient organization name, project name, or city. Additionally, in the sidebar you may filter the grants displayed by year, interest or grant amount.

Canadian Mental Health Association - BC Division

Living Life to the Full: increasing connection and resiliency among BC youth

Adolescence is a high-risk time for mental health problems like depression and anxiety and a key time to boost coping skills. Living Life to the Full (LLTTF) is an evidence-based course designed to teach youth skills for dealing with life's challenges. In 8 fun group sessions the course examines worry, low mood, isolation, healthy thinking, problem-solving, confidence, and anger. Canadian Mental Health Association, BC Division (CMHA BC) and its Blue Wave Youth Team (aged 13-18) have adapted the course for BC youth. Older youth facilitators delivered pilot courses in three BC communities in summer 2014, and a Fall evaluation is being used to improve the materials. The course will be delivered to 28 communities in urban and rural communities in 2015-2016. It will equip 560 youth with coping skills that promote resilience, reduce the risk of mental illness and risky behaviours, and encourage connection and engagement with peers and community. Investments in training will build community capacity to reach hundreds more youth BC-wide annually after 2016.
$45,054.00
2014

Social Innovation for Social Inclusion of Vulnerable Populations

Social Innovation for Social Inclusion of Vulnerable Populations
$10,000.00
2014

Developing Socially Inclusive Strategies: Policy Implications of Innovative Community Programming - A Knowledge Exchange Event

$12,782.85
2013

Canadian Mental Health Association - Kelowna & District Branch

Connected by 25

Connected by 25 is an innovative, cross-sectoral project that addresses the needs of young people between the ages of 16 and 24 in the Central Okanagan vulnerable in their transition to adulthood. Feedback from young people and community stakeholders identified both the need and rationale for the project, and a CAI service innovation grant allowed a two year pilot of Connected by 25 to start in early 2012. The project builds capacity within the community to ensure that young people at risk of falling through the cracks in their transition to adulthood have access to the services they require. It further serves to build capacity in youth themselves by offering the relational, emotional, and material supports they need. The project incorporates a dedicated part-time community capacity coordinator, who works with community based organizations to enhance collaboration, and identify and address systemic barriers. Concurrently, a full-time youth navigator provides directs supports and assistance to navigate complex systems, build connections and achieve success in their lives.
$80,000.00
2012

Meals Matter

Meals Matter - to provide low income individuals with the means to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Also supports low-intensity part-time staffing positions to people living with mental illness.
$90,000.00
2010

Canadian Mental Health Association - Port Alberni Branch

Healthy Harvest

Healthy Harvest Market Garden began four years ago with the idea of providing gardening skills and healthy food in a therapeutic environment for people with mental health issues. People were provided with a small honorarium for 10 hours of work per month. Since that time we have been able to get a long term lease on acreage and a greenhouse owned by the Hupacasath First Nations. The local food movement has been growing throughout BC and great opportunities exist in Port Alberni of which this project can take advantage. There is a great demand for local produce from restaurants in the Tofino-Ucluelet area and Port Alberni is the closest farming community. The Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District has a 20 year Agricultural Plan to achieve 40% food self-sufficiency. The ARCD recently hired an Agricultural Support Worker. There are two Farmer's Markets in operation in Port Alberni. We have experimented with different crops and methods of sales and are now ready to move into full production with the idea of becoming a self-sustaining social enterprise.
$33,000.00
2014

Canadian Mental Health Association - Prince George Branch

Expanding Employment - Year 2 and 3

The Expanding Employment project provides increased paid work experience and on the job site training to individuals who live with mental illness and substance use issues. Employees will have the opportunity to be trained by a professional chef in a catering business or work alongside an established crew on trail/yard maintenance, snow removal, gutter cleaning and small home repair jobs. These employment opportunities are in response to clients' requests to have "real jobs" and provide supportive work experience to assist in transitioning to community based employment. All prospective employees are matched with a support worker who will provide one on one vocational assistance and all will work on a team with a supportive trainer/leader who is in recovery. CMHA expects that some individuals will graduate to part or full time community based employment and all will benefit from increased independence and financial security which would lead to greater health outcomes.
$150,000.00
2012

Expanding Employment

The Expanding Employment project provides increased paid work experience and on the job site training to individuals who live with mental illness and substance use issues. Employees will have the opportunity to be trained by a professional chef in a catering business or work alongside an established crew on trail/yard maintenance, snow removal, gutter cleaning and small home repair jobs. These employment opportunities are in response to clients' requests to have "real jobs" and provide supportive work experience to assist in transitioning to community based employment. All prospective employees are matched with a support worker who will provide one on one vocational assistance and all will work on a team with a supportive trainer/leader who is in recovery. CMHA expects that some individuals will graduate to part or full time community based employment and all will benefit from increased independence and financial security which would lead to greater health outcomes.
$137,612.00
2011

Canadian Mental Health Association - Vancouver-Fraser Branch

Spiritual communities collaborate to engage mental health recovery

Spiritual communities offer support, meaningful values and practices to help with everyday life. Individuals with mental illness may, before anything else, seek help from their spiritual community. But their cry for help is not always met with understanding. Focus groups alerted Sanctuary that individuals with mental illness may be excluded from their spiritual communities' support network. While education on mental health is welcomed, the difficult task lies in leading communities through a process of action toward attitudinal change. In this project we aim to address barriers for inclusion and build support for individuals with mental illness in spiritual communities. We will coach action groups (peers, careers and leaders) within spiritual communities to bring issues into the open and garner support for individuals with mental illness. In order to engage a wider range of spiritual communities, we will partner with an interfaith network. Individuals from diverse spiritual backgrounds will be trained to work within their communities to build support for mental health recovery.
$64,000.00
2013

Social Enterprise Services

Social Enterprise Services
$32,000.00
2011

Green Dry Cleaning Social Enterprise for Mental Health Consumers

Green Dry Cleaning Social Enterprise for Mental Health Consumers
$30,000.00
2010

Canadian Music Centre

CMC-BC Composer Mentorship Program

Canadian Music Centre’s BC Associate Composers will take part in mentorship outreach program serving both schools and emerging composers across BC. This project encourages music students and faculty to collaborate with the creative writing, drama, dance and math departments. CMC senior composers will also work closely with emerging composers to support their creative endeavors.
$60,000.00
2011

Canadian National Institute for the Blind

Transition Peer Support Group for Young Adults in BC with Vision Loss

There is a lack of skills training and support for Canadians who are blind or partially sighted and the result is that 65 percent of working age adults with vision loss are unemployed and 50 percent earn less than $20,000 per year. CNIB's innovative Transition Peer Support Group for Young Adults in BC with Vision Loss will support young adults at this critical stage in their lives and prepare them with the skills and confidence they need to earn a living and maintain a job. Through interaction with others experiencing the same struggles and situations this pilot project will building acceptance of vision loss through the discovery of adaptive methods, accessibility options, independent living skills and practical skills such as interview techniques and resume writing. These groups will empower young adults with vision loss by arming them with essential tools and skills. Together, participants will explore and discuss topics related to education, transitioning into the working world, assistive technology to achieve independence, social interaction, family life and more.
$90,000.00
2014

Ensuring Accessibility for British Columbians with Vision Loss

Canada is a prosperous and technologically advanced society yet many Canadians with vision loss are excluded from social and economic opportunities. The lack of skills training and support results in 65% unemployment of working age adults with vision loss and 50% earning less than $20,000 annually. The harsh reality is only 45% of blind or partially sighted Canadian children graduate high school compared to 90% of sighted kids. To tackle these challenges, CNIB Specialists train those with vision loss to access information using assistive devices. These devices coupled with the skills taught by CNIB Specialists increases self-reliance, personal capacity and the ability to be productive, contributing community members. Our project, Ensuring Accessibility for British Columbians with Vision Loss, ensures no one in our province with vision loss is denied the fundamental right to access information. With your support we will expand our stock of assistive devices to eliminate our wait list and meet the increasing demand for vision rehabilitation services and equipment in British Columbia.
$20,000.00
2014

Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society,

Redefining Get Outside BC (RGOBC)

RGOBC will change the way we act, what we believe and potentially the resources that flow to youth-centered programing. First, CPAWS-BC will accept that our current model of hosting a single summit in the Lower Mainland as the primary tool for youth engagement and leadership training is flawed. Instead, with the Vancouver Foundation’s support, we will host a four-day youth summit in Central Vancouver Island, the Okanagan, and the Kootenays, as well as focus and planning groups in various regions. To date, most youth programs are devised in Vancouver and implemented elsewhere. RGOBC will be devised and implemented locally, leaving space for the influence and sharing of ideas from other regions, ensuring a wider range of voices and experience are incorporated. Youth and a diverse group of educators, leaders and social innovators will collaborate in the program with the intention of critiquing, deconstructing and rebuilding the structure and approach. Youth will lead all aspects of the process. Non-youth participants, including potential corporate funders, will be engaged in the program, but will take guidance from youth throughout. It will help create “buy-in” for the concept and program, since adults will be part of the larger systemic change and will be asked to be a part of the long-term funding plan. The final program outcomes will be shared with the broader environmental community in an effort to change the wider movement. CPAWS-BC will demonstrate that change is possible
$9,000.00
2016

Get Outside BC 2017 – Fostering Change Edition

CPAWS-BC believes that in order to ensure conservation is a long-term priority, we need to equip the next generation of youth to feel safe exploring nature; to defend socially, culturally and biologically important spaces; and to lead their peers along a similar journey. We also need to ensure that all youth have these skills and experiences, and not just a privileged few. Get Outside BC (GOBC) is a longer term youth-led leadership program that supports young people gain the mental and physical health benefits of being in wilderness, while also being a leader in a larger social and environmental change movement. After speaking with young people and social service organizations, we learned that youth in care were craving the opportunities that GOBC offered but faced many barriers to participation. For example, some programs were prohibitively expensive for youth, or social service organizations didn’t have the capacity to start these programs on top of their regular programming. CPAWS-BC will work with youth in care, youth agencies and other experts to redesign GOBC specifically to meet the needs of youth in care. In doing so, we will amplify youth voice and engage young people and youth-serving orgs in creating a program formula that ensures full access and participation. Our longer-term goal is to demonstrate our outcomes for the larger community in order to make more inclusive and accessible spaces.
$25,000.00
2016

Canadian Society for Social Development

Internet Business Development for Entrepreneurs (IBDE)

IBDE is an online, accredited training program that helps persons with disabilities (PWD) become web designers or establish a business website. Curriculum is accessed from www.ibde.ca, allowing participants to learn comfortably from home. Participants receive one-on-one assistance from qualified, caring personnel who understand the challenges they face. Assistance is offered in our virtual classroom and through instant messaging, email, and telephone. We offer two IBDE programs: (1) IBDE Web Essentials, a six-month introductory web design program, and (2) IBDE Web Advanced, a four-month program offering training in web programming and web marketing. Through this project we plan to provide supports to 17 individuals in total, eleven in IBDE Web Advanced and six in IBDE Web Essentials. This project will increase employment for PWD by equipping them with technical skills and experience that are in high demand by employers and the business community.
$40,000.00
2011

CanAssist, University of Victoria

Expansion and Diversification of the TeenWork Employment Program

TeenWork is a unique social innovation. No other employment program in BC supports young people with disabilities while they are still in high school. The program was developed in 2009, when community partners identified the need for an employment service aimed at youth with disabilities. These youth were isolated and not acquiring important life skills associated with working. TeenWork helps level the playing field so youth with disabilities are able to reap the benefits of employment like their non-disabled peers. Job coaches provide individualized support to improve opportunities for employment among youth facing barriers and to continue this support during the transition to adulthood. TeenWork graduates eligible for government disability assistance tend not to access it because they have jobs that pay well and good benefits. Participants are optimistic about the future and their ability to be self-sufficient and contribute to their families and communities. Yet TeenWork only reaches 10% of youth in Greater Victoria who could benefit. Funding requested from the Vancouver Foundation would help expand the program in three critical ways: 1) improve program efficiencies and implement new fee-for-service opportunities to ensure ongoing sustainability; 2) diversify the participant population to include youth facing a wider range of barriers; and 3) work toward serving youth across BC by creating a training package that enables replication of the program in other regions.
$150,000.00
2015

Addendum to "Apps for Employment" (DSF12-0037)

CanAssist had initially proposed developing apps on the Apple platform in our 2012 request, targeting release on the Apple App Store at the conclusion of the project so that they are available to people with disabilities on a wider scale. This decision was made as support apps for the disability community traditionally have been overwhelmingly written for Apple devices. Through consultation with the Employment Apps Advisory Committee (clients, their job coaches and service providers), we have learned that device use among the target population accessing supported employment services is now more in line with the general population, with Android representing the majority of users. In fact, due to the lower cost of Android-based devices, these devices are now common for individuals with disabilities that may be living on a fixed or lower income. In order to maximize the accessibility of the apps created from this initiative, CanAssist would like to develop them on both Android and Apple platforms (and by extension, easing future versions for Blackberry or Windows Phone devices).
$50,000.00
2014

Apps for Employment

CanAssist proposes a two-year project, in partnership with community agencies, to create a suite of software tools that will help people with disabilities obtain and retain meaningful employment. In the first phase, CanAssist will tailor 2 of its existing software applications (apps) and develop 1 to 2 new apps and provide them to an initial group of clients. These clients, people with developmental disabilities, acquired cognitive challenges, ASD or FASD, will be identified by agency partners and, along with their job coaches, provide feedback to aid CanAssist in refining the apps. CanAssist will train job coaches and equip them to provide ongoing assistance to their clients. In the second phase, larger numbers of clients will use the apps in work-related activities. Surveys will be conducted to assess the apps’ effectiveness. Finally, the software and supporting materials will be made widely available online, providing a lasting legacy by establishing apps as a new best practice in employment-related support for those with disabilities.
$142,340.00
2012

Teen Work and Tech Work

The concept for TeenWork originated during discussions in 2008 among a group of partners, informally called the Greater Victoria Supported Teen Employment Consortium, the members of which provide a wide range of disability support services across Greater Victoria and the surrounding areas. CanAssist acted as the catalyst to bring this group together and continues to play the role of faciliatator and secretariat for all Consortium activities. The TeenWork program is a truly innovative pilot project designed to change the life path of young people with special needs by helping them find and retain part-time employment. A TeenWork staff member works with participating teens and their families, as well as local businesses, to prepare each youth for a part-time job and help them find work. A job coach then works with the teens as each develops new skills and becomes comfortable in his or her position.
$45,000.00
2011

TeenWork and TechWork

TeenWork and TechWork - To provide and promote meaningful and integrated employment and training opportunities, and/or related technological supports, for those with special needs.
$55,000.00
2010

Canucks Autism Network Society

Adapted Sports and Rec Expansion in Kamloops and Nanaimo for Children Living with Autism

With 1 in 68 children identified as being on the autism spectrum, the need for adapted sports and recreation programs is growing. This project aims to increase our program reach throughout the province by expanding into new, under-served communities where we do not currently have programs (Nanaimo and Kamloops). Additionally this project strives to increase community capacity through the delivery of autism specific sport and recreation training for our partners, by including their staff in our programs so they can gain hands on autism specific sport delivery experience, and developing a train the trainer model so our partners have the skills and tools to support individuals with autism in their existing community programs. Through this three year approach, we will move from hands on program delivery of adapted sports and recreation programs, to community centre staff being trained to deliver recreation programs for people living with autism through partnered program delivery to finally overseeing integrated sports and recreation programs that take place within the community.
$138,000.00
2016

"I CAN Volunteer" Program

The "I CAN Volunteer" program is designed to encourage participants' development of professional experience and employable skills, facilitating their transitions into the workforce. The program is designed to focus on problem solving, creative thinking, proficiency and leadership abilities. The program provides a series of workshops followed by a practical experience portion within our existing programs. The workshops are conducted with a view to progressive behavioural skills training, where the skills emphasized within each session build upon those developed in the preceding workshop. Each workshop is structured to facilitate skill development by breaking each lesson into individual components of instruction, modelling, testing, and constructive feedback. The practical experience portion grants participants the opportunity to internalize the skills emphasized within the workshops, and to gain practical work experience in a sports and recreation environment. Staff will work to tailor the program, both workshops and volunteer opportunities, to the specific needs of each participant.
$3,250.00
2014

CLICK (a social photography program)

CLICK is a social photography program for teens aged 13-17 living with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). While working with their peers, groups of ten teens with ADS will learn basic camera use, take pictures and explore social skills and friendship through their own photography. Each session, participants will have the opportunity to share their photos and discuss the subject matter of their work. The participants will also be expected to take photos with the group during each lesson as well as take photos during the week while they are not at CLICK. The program will end with a gallery show of everyone's work presented to a group of staff, family and friends. The program will be led by a fully qualified photography instructor and supported by Canucks Autism Network program staff.
$6,175.00
2012

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