Enterprising Non-profits and Starworks

Enterprising Non-Profits

Starting a business with an ulterior motive of helping the community can be a challenge. Enterprising Non-Profits aims to make it easier by helping social enterprises develop business skills, including business planning.

Starworks is one of the organizations they helped. Creating employment for people with developmental disabilities, Starworks provides customized light manufacturing and kit assembly work – anything from assembling road signs, parts kits or just stuffing envelopes. Their clients include BC Hydro, Finning Canada and more.

Child care for teenage moms

Emma's Daycare

High school education is the foundation for adult life.

Emma’s Daycare, provided on-site at Sir Charles Tupper School, helps make it easier for teenage mothers to finish their education. At the same time, their children get quality early learning experiences that make a difference later in life.

Emma’s Daycare, operated by the YWCA, has helped many moms and their children get a good start.

www.ywcavan.org

(Originally aired: 2005)

Business Objects takes a hike

Business Objects

When it comes to corporate philanthropy, the employees drive the giving at Business Objects, an SAP company. “Old” corporate philanthropy is the CEO writing a check. “New” corporate philanthropy is bringing your employees to the table, enabling them to make a difference.

Bringing a bog back to life

Pacific Parklands Foundation

They call them the crazy boggers. In 1999, a group of volunteers with the Pacific Parklands Foundation set about restoring the Camosun Bog on the fringes of Pacific Spirit Park in Vancouver. Six years later it is a perfect bog habitat.

Many similar projects are in the works at Pacific Parklands Foundation, which aims to bridge the gap between government funding and the needs of our urban parks. With support from Vancouver Foundation and income from their endowment, they fund various projects in our parks.

A home away from home

The South Granville Seniors Centre is a gathering place, a place to connect and find companionship. The Centre promotes healthy and independent lifestyles with activities from bridge to yoga, day trips and more. They also serve meals a few times a week.

They use an endowment fund at Vancouver Foundation to fund its services. It truly is a home away from home.

www.southgranvilleseniors.ca

(Originally aired: 2005)

ABC-123

Abbotsford Community Services

It’s never too early for kids to start enjoying reading and learning. ABC-123 is a pre-school program that focuses on literacy. With all of the play of a typical pre-school, they take every opportunity to enhance literacy skills.

The Program, which runs in five Abbotsford locations, thanks Vancouver Foundation for “having the vision to see where this would go” and for providing nearly $95,000 in grants. They hope that ABC-123 is only the beginning of a lifetime of literacy.

(Originally aired: 2005)

A garden in the heart of the city

Since 1975, VanDusen Botanical Garden has been educating the public about the importance of biodiversity, right in the heart of Vancouver.

A former golf course saved from development by concerned residents, the garden is now home to 7,500 different kinds of plants from six continents. A historian describes it as a living breathing organism that is still growing. A $20 million “rejuvenation” campaign is under way to renovate the gardens and create a “living building” – a sustainable, energy efficient structure with no environmental footprint.

Helping young musicians grow

Vancouver Academy of Music

The Academy is more than just a school of music. It’s a community where students can grow as musicians.

They offer classical classes for all levels from three-year olds learning the Suzuki method to aspiring professional musicians. Their mission is to provide a high standard of music education to all students in the community. Many members of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra teach at the Academy.

Building a new home

Surrey Museum

Surrey Museum has been busy collecting artifacts, and building an audience.

When they amassed almost 100,000 artifacts and archival documents, they decided it was time for a new home. Thanks to Vancouver Foundation, they were able to build a glassy, 24,000 square foot museum, which is now open for the public to enjoy and learn about our fascinating past.

(Originally aired: 2005)

Pages

Subscribe to Vancouver Foundation RSS